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Full text of "Amstrad Action Issue 014"



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BRITAIN'S ONLY MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO THE AMSTRAD CPC 464, 664 AND 6128 



No. 14 NOVEMBER 1 



ART STUDIO 

Full review of this powerful painting package 




&ig bouncing Mastergame from Vortex 



MAPS GALORE 



Dan Dare and Price of Ma gift mapped in full 



GAM" v S • PILGRIM • BUMPER CHEAT MODE 

ABSOLUTE SEGiMNERS • &GOTJNG UP C 

EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE • NEWS 
VIEWS • SPECIAL Of PcRS • AND MUCH MORE 



WIN A 
GHETTOBLASTER! 

Mastertronic 
mega- com petition 



VOUR M35H1- RETRIEVE FfM3Q 'JOUR COUNTRIES 
REWLUTlQifflRy FIGHTER. LDCRWI1 - HOG HUES 

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Sffiftt STRONGHOLDS -PRHIRIES. CITIES. 

$7int INTptNC Q/OOD riQ QQtnCEC mtCQmN iZTpTt *C_ 

t tuut unit /_*, nii\riu-u„i, oKtuocj i tiDDiut t Dtnt uD 

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PRA1RK 







CITY 



AMSTRAD 



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SCREEN SHOTS FROM 
ORIGINAL COIN-OP 




DATA EAST 




AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 



FRONT END 



EDITORIAL • NEWS • LETTERS 

5 ED-LINES 

Talcs of the Old Barn - the eerie* continues. 

6 REACTION 

Four pages of your letters, complaints, ideas, poems, news 
and views. 

1 4 AMSCENE 

All the news from the PGW Show recently held in Olympia. 



SERIOUS SIDE 



REVIEWS • ARTICLES • PROFfLES 

21 ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS - Part 7 

Baffled by Basic? Then read our easy guide to programming. 

24 BOOTING UP CP/M - Part 5 

Tha gentle art of housekeeping. 

26 PROBLEM ATTIC & HOT TIPS 

Your technical problems and ingenious solutions. 

29 A DAY IN THE LIFE 

We kick off this new series with the inside story of Amstrad 
Action itself; how we do U with Amstrads. 

31 BACK TO SCHOOL 

Arnold tries the mortarboard for size. 

34 SERIOUS SOFTWARE SHORTS 

Speech, Music Sox and Breakpoint get the Wilton treatment. 



36 THE ART STUDIO 

Rainbird's powerful art package provides a full palette for 
Arnold's artistic poientiaJ. 






S'w _-**' 



41 BOOK REVIEWS 

Two technical books that delve right into Arnold's innards. 



ACTION & ADVENTURE 



OVER 1 5 GAMES • MAPS • THE PllGRIM 

4 3 A CftON TEST STARTS HEME! 

Turn to this page for a FULL LIST of the games reviewed in 
the next 17 pages - PLUS your Top Ten Chan. These are just 
the Raves... 

46 DEACTIVATORS 

Bomb disposal against the clock in this split-screen Rave. 

48 SPLIT PERSONALITIES 

Your chance to rearrange soma heads of state. 



48 TEMPEST 

The still* that Electric Dreams are made of. 





50 REVOLUTION 

Abstract bounce-eiu-up from Highway specialist Vortex. 













67 PILGRIM'S PAGES 

The Master of Adventure brings you (he latest and greatest. 

72 PRICE OF MAGIK MAP 

Four-page map of this mega adventure game. 

90 DAN DARE MAP 

Devilishly clever map of the Mekon's asteroid. 



INTERACTION 



THE SECTION CREATED IV AND FOB TO U 

19 WE NEED YOU! 

How you can get your name m AA - and Serious Software 
Charts. 

76 CHEAT MODE 

FIVE! - YES FtVE PAGES!! Of pokes for your favourite games 
this month. 

85 TYPE- INS 

These programs are free, w> get those typing fingers 
tapping. 



89 WIN A GHETTO BLASTER! 

Or a Sony Walkman, a digital watch or a host of other goodies 
with our Masiertronic Super Competition . 

r 




92 MAIL-ORDER 

Order software from your armchair and save yourself 
pounds. 

94 SPECIAL OFFERS 

Be tempted by huge discounts on lop titles - it's available 
only from us] 

96 FORMS 

All-in-one Action form for your interaction. 




Hasn't it been a wonderful summer? If you're talking about the 
weather, then you must be joking: the West Country is re- 
nowned fa j rain, and it has certainly lived up to its reputation 
this lime. The clack of Arnold's keys has usually been accom- 
panied by the tap of Somerset rain on the windows. 

But at least there has been plenty to write about - and 
plenty to offer you if you haven't been able to make it to sunnier 
climes this year. Cheat Mode, in particular, has taken off with a 
vengeance: five pages of powerful pokes and two magnificent 
maps. Not only have we mapped Dan Dare in colour, but also 
the whole of The Price ofMsgick in a four-page extravaganza. 
That should keep you busy for a While! 

On the Serious Side we have the cover story - a three-page 
Teview of the powerful Art Studio drawing package - together 
with a look at the state of educational software for Arnold, 
Absolute Beginners and Booting up CP/M continue to help you 
make sense of Basic and the operating system, while Problem 
Attic merges with the new Hot Tips section and gets two pages 
all to itself, 

And you can read all about us too: we have kicked off the 
Day in. the Lite series, in which we look at unusual uses for 
Amstrads, by looking at the way we produce Amsirad Action, 

Aclion Test is packed full as usual, though this month has 
been a little scarce for games meriting Afl-Rave status. Master- 
game, however, is Revoitition - turn to the middle to find out 

more. 

And we have a superb competition for you. Those awfully 
nice people at Masteitronic are giving away piles of electronic 
goodies if you can put your artistic ability and imagination into 
gear. Ghetto Blasters, Walkmen and awfully neat digital 
watches are up for grabs for the best picture - see page 89 for 
more details. 

So stop staring at the rain: open up A\fl, turn on Arnold, and 
have fun. 








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VOICE OF THE PEOPLE 

What! - I hear you shout - not favourite jayatck-waster, or 



remore Hx-Score but now favourite utility, then lei 
KJ2 £ "S?w ' V ° iC t ° f *• *■** - P"*"5riy m l63S than 

Soil r?; 2o ° "*»* *"*•«■ *«** 



hot, i repeat not. axing it all 
together. It's just that we want to 
change it, 



viewing games, as Voice of die 
Peonle stand* mow. wo it'sm ««,* 



to actively criticise what we say 
in our reviews - or indeed any- 
where in the magazine. If you 
think Bob got it wrong on your 



WHOOPS! 

The observant reader will h»*e 
noticed a bit of a booboo on our 
part in Issue )3 of this esteemed 
journal. On page* 38 and 39 D*n 
J3ane would appear to have 
achieved Akfcaye statu* wiih 
an AA Bating of only ?S per 
cesa. while Mission Omega fail* 
to get on* with a rating of 80 p«* 
cent. 

The sticker ia in the right 
place, be* unfortunately the sw- 
ing* boa got transposed by rois- 
taka: £>«n £*ar» is, in our view, 
the better game of the two. A* 
you may have iko nouewd, Toot 
is notably absent from these 
pages too, so perhaps . „ ? 



tribute too. 

But we don't just want you 
telling us what a load of walliea 



VII 

to justify your criticisms if you 



woah ua iu pujjusiL yatir LI 
The address, a? usual, 19 Voice 
of the People, Amstirad Action, 
Somerton, Somerset, Till 
BAM. 



Sjf^A 



m 



e 



PLUS TWO vs 464 

Although the recent Personal 
Computer World Show ai 
Olympia was dominated by 
Alan Sugars new PC, he also 
chose this venue 10 launch the 
Spectrum Plug 2. 

This machine - basically a 
ZX Spectrum wish a decent key- 
board and built-in cassette 
deck, gelling at £149 - would 
appear to offer strong compe- 
tition to Amstrad's own CPC 
464, It is true that the 484 comes 
complete with a monochrome 
monitor for £199. or £299 with a 
colour monitor; but the compe- 
tition :s slit! there 

The main threat comes from 
the huge library of games soft- 
ware out there for the Spectrum 
range - even now many games 
appear in Spectrum incarnation 



before the Amsttad versions ap- 
pear However, in most other 
Ways: the CPC 464 is a bettor 
machine: in particular it offers a 
faster version of the programm- 
ing language Basic (the Spec- 
trum is particularly slow here] 
and far better graphic and 
■colour resolution, 

Amstrad assures us thai 
production of 464s is still at full 
sirengih, and Ihe company does 
not intend to drop the machine 
But ii is still a potential worry to 
464 owners and buyers. We {of 
course) will still support the 464, 
<md thete is every indication 
that the rest of the industry will 
too. However we will be moni- 
toring the situation carefully and 
would, like to hear from anyone 
who has trouble buying a 464, 



«*! 



AMSmSB ACIION NOVEMBER 





Thanhs for all your letters again this month: we 
actually counted, and there are almost 300. So please 

don't be offended if we have room to prmt only o very 
small selection. You'll understand that we can't reply 
individually and still have time to put out a magazine! 

A few points to bear in mind when writing: Keep 
your letter to the point - the best are brief. If you have 
bits for different departments {subscriptions, mail- 
order, the Pilgrim, Type-Ins, Re-action etc) pul them on 
separate sheets of paper, each headed with your name 
and address and possibly even the date and your 
phone number (but one envelope will do). 

Keep 'em taming! 



Author! Author! 

The computer-games; industry 
as a whole gives loo much hype 
to games thai haven't been re- 
leased, and when they arc they 
axe often not worth paying even 
50p. 

Also loo much attention is 
paid to the games or software 
and a blind eye is turned to 
their authors, People know only 
ace programmers Jon Hitman, 
Bemie Drummond and Paul 
Shirley for their games: Batman. 
Confuzion, Spindizsy. Program- 
mers should be credited. 
Games could have the name of 
Ihe authors at the top. so the 
buyer can expect good quality 
if that programmer has in the 
past produced good software. I 
waa wondering if you could do 
something about this in your 
magwane. Who wrote last 
month's mastergame, Starstrike 
Blot instance? 

[ have owned my 494 for 
almost two years and have deci- 
ded to gel a 6123 but cannot 
part with my old Arnold, Can 
you please tell me if a 61 £8 can 
be bought separately without 
any Type Of monitor, if so for 
how much, and can it be 
plugged into my CTM 640 
colour monitor? 

1 would also like to hear 
from penpals or people wishing 
to buy software originals. Are 
there any user clubs in the Wor- 
cestershire area? 
Mam ood Saltan 
109 Cranium Drive 
Warn dan, Worcester 
WR4 9PQ 



Last month's maatcrganw was 
by a team of programmers at 
Realtime Games* and corporate 
rather than individual effort is 
the rule rathor than the excep- 
tion nowadays, 

As for buying a 61B8 with- 
out a monitor, it's a question of 
striking a deal with an indiv- 
idual shopkeeper. But the 6128 
needs an additional 12-voIt 
supply for the disk, so it can t 
just be plugged into your CTM 
monitor. 







Wade's day's made 

Shouldn't I get a prize? I am the 
only AA reader in the Dolgellau 
area. My copy is ordered for 
me every month at Siop-y- 
Cymro (the 'Welshman's Shop'). 
The area covers three or four 
main towns with populations 
over g,00€. In Merioneth county 
[ know of only two other 
Amslrad users, but they don't 
get AA. Don't fear, I'll stick with 
you so long as Mr Bob Wade 
slays on the team - he must 
probably be the most experien- 
ced reviewer in the UK; I rarely 
disagree with his opinions. 
Bryan John Parry 
Dolgellau, Gwynedd 

Diolch am eich Uythyr, loan! 

Bog of literature 

] am an ex-proud owner of a 
CPC 464 - by which 1 mean that] 
am now only an owner of a 464. 
During the two years I owned 
the Spectrum 1 was literally 
flooded with alt sorts ol mail 
such as software catalogues and 
new-product leaflets from Sin- 
clair Research, all of which I 
found interesting, Since obtain- 
ing my 464, however, I have 
received only one letter from 
Amstrad and that Was only to try 
to lure me into joining their user 
group. This may be a trivial 
point, you may think, but it 
merely illustrates to me that 
Amslrad is only interested in 
making big profits. 

Olher examples of this mer- 
cenary attitude include the 664 
saga and Amstrad 'a refusal to 
allow third-party production of 
the QL after acquiring Sinclair, 
while not producing it them- 
selves. Alan Saccharine might 
be a more suitable name, as I 
definitely detect a sour 
aftertaste. 

Ron an McKfin.ua 
Kelts, Co. Meoth, Eire 

You might try sending your ad- 
dress to Readers Digest and tho 
other AA (as in oars) if you like 
being literally (literally) 
flooded. Sinclair support was 
more necessary because the 
products were less reliable - if 
promises over materialised and 
wares ever turned up. 



A A stars 

I am writing to fell you how 
appalled 1 am that games like V 
and Johnny Feb are even al* 
lowed to be put on the market, 
let alone to be sold m almost 
nine pounds- Most full -whack 
computer games are absolute 
rubbish and a complete rip* off. 
Something has to be done about 
this. Even though you do great 
reviews you soil can't review 
every single one. Those you do 
review are pretty well checked 
out, though sometimes a month 
or so loo late or not given 
enough space. 

Why not, instead of just re- 
viewing them, approve them? 
What I mean is teal the games, 

then on the box bo me where put 
an 'AA- Approved' sticker. If 
you did this it would save a lot 
of people like me who can't 
afford to fork out 10 quid on 
rubbish, and make software 
houses like Ocean think twice 
about making such drivel- 
Chxi stop her MakriftsOn 
Ley land, Lanes 

It's up to the software houses. 
Wo don t let them sell us what to 
say in AA, L could we tell them 
what to print on thoir packs? 



Give us a tiff 

I'd like to bring to the attention 
of your readers an often 
overlooked, yet vital and excit- 
ing element that can make or 
break a game: lifts. Scoff if you 
like, but think about this: where 
would we be without the old 
elevators? Ground floor, T 
suspect. 

Games generally have one 
of two types of lifts: small ones 
or Large ones. In the former 
category J could cite Ihe cs 
capades of WilJy, GUligan, 
Chuckie. jack of the Jet Boots, 
Mario and many more. Who 
could ever forge l that scene in 
Chuckle Egg where our hapless 
hero plunges to certain doom 
only to be scooped at Ihe last 
possible minute? Thrilling stuff. 
In his adventure in space that 
lovable working-class-kid- 

come-good Willy encountered 
quite a few lifts. When asked 
about ihcm he joked, 'I'd of 
never of got up there without 
thorn," Ha, ha! 

Anyway I'm going off at a 
tangent hare. 

The other category is large 
lifts, or "big ones', as they arc 
often referred to, This breed 
has appeared in classics like 
Impossible Mission, Pyjama- 
ratna (complete with a dart), 
Bocky Horror Show, Thing on a 
Spring - 1 could go on - 1 will go 
on - Marspon, Gromphey. Spa- 



6 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 a 



nimjure. 



RE-ACTION 



Some do ask us if they can 
icprir.t an AA Save' symbol ait 
their package, or a rich phrase 
from Bob Wade's prose. &u t you 
can't expect them to stamp 
World Cup Carnival, tor in- 
stance. 'AA rating: 0%\ 

So it's up to you to part with 
a pound,, buy the mag and read 







p^re Apt thet ? " 



llbound, ... Many of these have 
radical new features, for in- 
stance the Springy Thing:) 
elevator has a Sticky substance 

on the Boor whicii makes it im- 
possible for you lo move when 
il is motion, In Pyjamarama and 
Spellbound you don't even get 
to see the lift moving: - incred- 
ible but true. 




«z* CfM!p^ifi& T^fr compeer 
o* jeers . . , " 



efte review before forking- out 

any tenners. 

Body- building 
Arnold 

Has anybody at DK'Tronics or 
some other third-party supplier 
thought of bringing out a second 
processor or sideways ROMS 
for the dear old Arnold? Seem- 
ingly the Amsitad has the caps- 
bilsty 10 handle both. 

Why don't you copy your 
rival mag and bring out 
sweatshirts and t shirts with 
your logo on the front? 
Steven Allan 
Edinburgh 

There axe plenty of sideways 
ROMs on the market: see July, 
p26-28- Nobody has produced a 
second processor, and we can t 
see there being much demand 
for one. U yon want a more 
powerful machine, Amstrad 
would say. here is Our PC. 

Maybe we could also think 
of bringing outs roadmap with 
our logo. 

Mega-moan 

Whenever you see an advert for 
a piece of software (eg Ocean) 

you see underneath 'Amstrad 
£3.85, Spectrum £7.95'. Why is it 




Lifts should no longer be 
neglected or sneered at - they 
play a significant role an our 
joystick-pushing hours - lei's 
hear it for them! Yes! 

Liateai, why don't you start a. 
Lift-ol-the-month fealurette in 
which readers could nominate 



must be the supurb one an Mai- 
sport a true masterpiece 

WOW, 
Alex Duck 
Cheadle. Cheshire 

Listen, Alex. This is one twig, up 
at the top of the tree of knowled- 
ge, yet to be elevated into a PhD 
thesis. You're obviously a 
candidate for liigher education. 
Rise to the challenge! 



that Spectrum, owners can get 
most software a pound or two 
cheaper that), we can? It's not 
fair! 

When are you going to give 
away another cover cassette-? I 
thought The Covenant was fan- 
tastic and worth more than SOp. 
Neii Selwyn 
West Lulworth. Dorset 

We asked Ian. Stewart, manag- 
ing director of Gremlin, which 
advertises Commodore soft- 
ware at £7, Spectrum £9 and 
Amstrad £10 (with Sp change). 
The Amstrad game costs more 
'"cos it's better: there's music, 
a/td the graphic* took longer to 
work on than than the 
Spectrum '$. Within a short time 
the Spectrum programs will be 
the same price; with the ad- 
vances in Spectrum coding they 
will take up the same pro- 
gramming time. There has de- 
finitely been a quality differ- 
ence. Because of its general 
handling you can produce a bet- 
ter product on the Amstrad, 
•mthout doubt. " 

The official answer from "a 
spokesman" at Ocean is the 
extra cost of converting a prog 
tor the Amstrad most was hrst 
written on the Spectrum or 
Commodoro. Second, there 
aren 't as many Amstrad o wners, 
so economy of scale applies. 

Snails vs hares 

[ find it impossible not to be 
slightly frustrated and annoyed 
when every month 1 go to any 
bookshop and see Amstrad Ac- 
tion up on the shell, while I 
know my copy is still 'on its 
way'. To make matters ironic, 
the July issue came by post 
several days before il arrived in 
the bookshops, and yet t 
find AA apologising for a 
delay! What are the exact 
procedures for subscription? 
Joseph Doyle 
Waterford City, Eire 

A von Direct Mail (the contractor 
we use) posts out subscription 



copies on the l&st Friday of 
every month. Newsstands usu- 
ally get theirs (via other chan- 
nels) the Following Thursday. 
However we will look into your 
case. 



Really! Number 1 J 

1 have got two, yes two. copies 

of AA issues 1 and 3. If anyone 

wants to buy either of them, 

state your bid. 

Robert Heater 

62 Roseneath Ave Due 

Leicester, LE4 7GT 

You 're lucky to possess the rare 
AA 1, but we have plenty of 
number 3 for sale here at the 
Old Bam, 



Hi-score non-halku 

Hear ye my tale of woe: 

I went down to my local store 
to buy a game to play. 
1 went straight to the counter 
and asked for Creejr Beret. 

I think the game is really great; 
I'll play it evermore. 
And one of m y ambitions was 
lo get in your "Hi-Score 1 , 

At first 1 didn't do so well 
but now I'm getting better. 
But now I'm so frustrated, 
which is why I write this letter. 

I'd just achieved 69,000 (enough 

to fame your table) 

bo 1 was. about to send it. 

excitement in the air. 

[ opened up issue 12 

and found it wasn't there! 

Well, that was it; t hit the roof; 
I thought. 'It can't be true!' 

1 said lo myself, fuming mad, 

'AA, how could youl" 

I suppose you think it funny, 
the way you pull your tucks. 
Well, if you do it one more time 
I'm subscribing to [some orhet 
mag- ed.]. 

(I'm not, rosily ! But bring back 

Hi-Score!) 

S. Hobaa (age 11) 

Gars wood, nr Wigan 










'£ 




b.A.kttriw AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1988 7 



RE-ACTION 




An evergreen 
reader 

Please could we have a little 
less exhortation to 'drool* over 
our software? H k s teTiibly bad 
for tht? disks, apart from any- 
thing else. 

And don't assume all your 
readers are younger than you 
when you write. I finally gave 
gp on your rivals when they 
included in * questionnaire. 
'How much pocket-money do 
you get? How much Pepsi do 
you drink?" They also advertise 
t-Khirta modelled on someone 
who didn't look a day over 
eight. This can alienate the 
more 'senior' games pUyeis 
such as myself - if late 20s can 
be described as 'senior" 

A suggestion: How about a 
tow retrospective re-reviews? 
For example, you could briefly 
sum up what you now consider 
to be the best sports simulation 
or the beat beat-em-up. You 
could give a much better as- 
sessment of 'staying power': 
how many tunes did you really 
reload the game alter the Hist 
couple of weeks? A previous 
correspondent suggested his 
favourite 'evergreen' was Star 
Avenger. My own candidale 
would also be a Kami product; 
Fruity Frank. I always reload it 
with pleasure and seem to find 
some new lactic in it every time. 

You told D Hemiwjton in 
your September issue that it was 
tricky to boot a. program from 
disk using the |CPM command. 
Unless I'm missing something, 
all you have to do is use the 
'Setup* command which the 
manual explains unusually 
clearly, typo the name of your 
command program (followed 
by *M) into the "initial command 
buffer', and then answer yes to 
all the other questions. 
Pan! Murphy 
London N19 

"Drool' w*s an Arsdersontsm- He 
now works upstairs, which 
might explain why it's damp 
down here. 

Sir, we strenuously avoid 
witting down to our readers. 
We know a good many parents 
and pensioners Ate numbered 
among them. 

IT new products remind us 
oi oldies (goldies or otherwise) 
that's when reviewers re- 
mention them. There are vari- 
ous office favourites, depending 
OB personalities: Andy and Bob 
like Thrust,' Jane Farmer and Di 
are wont to load up Wriggler or 
Sorcery Plus; Trevor chooses 
ShogLn: Matt particularly goes 
lor two player games such as 
Harvey Keadbangor , 

As for Seiup. you could in- 
deed under CP/M 2.2 do as you 



suggest CPfM Pius doesn't 
have this utility, and you use the 
Submit method as outlined to Mr 

Harrington, 

Mum's not knitting 

I 'i(u .i i " will. 1lni.:.'- young 

children, and we recently pur- 
chased a 464. 1 never thought 
that I would become so interes- 
ted it what ii can do. (Whal s the 
saying about never being loo 
old?) 1 want to thank you for 
such an excellent magazine. 
This is no flannel: being so new 
to compuiing f bought them all 
and 1 found yours the best value 
for money and the most interest- 
ing, Better than knitting patterns 
ar.y day! 
Lynda Gunn 
Hockley, Essex 

Two in 4 row. The latter ed'r 
fails to think of a witty remark 
about evergreen needles. 




* &ej<i> nt^e £**t op piAtto 

Impossibly long 

How long do 1 have !o wait to get 
Impossible Mission by US G old? 
I have been waiting eight 
months: I subscribed in Decem- 
ber and ordered n as one of the 
two free games. 

MC Bover 
Shcnficid, Essex 

US Gold tells as the game is now 
to be released at the end of 
September, and we reviewed it 
in our October issue. In April 
AA sent waiting subscribers the 
other free game and a letter 
offering US Gold's Winter 
Games or other alternatives. 



Julie's indexed us 

I have produced a list ot all the 
games reviewed in Amstrad Ac- 
tion {except those in Amsyclo- 



pedia) on my word-processor 
updated every month as soon as 

I get my copy of AA, Entries are 
in alphabetical order, with soft- 
ware company, price of tape 
and disc, joystick or keys, AA 
rating and which snag it's in. 

Readers cart buy copies for 
90p. Enclose an sae and say 
which CPC you have, so 1 can 
nuss out games which aren't 
compatible with your computer 
(or you can have have a com- 
plete list if you warn). It's nai 
worth dotng a list just for PGWs. 
There is also an Amsyclcpedia 
list, which also costs 50p. 
Julie Gilg 
9 Sylvan Avenue 
Exeter 
EX4 6ES 

This .tUovrs as to cfet in a plug 
for back issues covered in your 
very efficient-sounding index, 
Julie, The Old Barn is our of 
number? L2, 6 and 7. but other- 
wise all can be ordered for 
£1,3$ including post and pac- 
king. Number 8 with the PSS 
cassette costs £1.65, 

Vive ! 1 Arnold! 

It does not exist a good French 
mag like yours. I know in Paris 
only one shop which sells AA 
and ii takes me each month 
more than one hour to go and 
buy it (with an increased price 
of 130%). 




So. I've thought about a sub- 
scription. But I do hernials. I've 
read in a French mag thai some 
people had problems with fore- 
ign (UK!) subscriptions. 
Perez Thierry 
149 rue Oberkampf 
75011 Paris 

Subscriptions (pas de pre- 
bleme, Peres) posted lo Europe 
cost £22.50 for douse issues, 
plus your choix of free joystick, 
dustcovsr or Thingi. 



Elite bafflement 

In the August issue Reaction, 
Problem Attic and Cheat Mode 
all had bus on Elite. I was wor- 
ried, annoyed and baffled after 
reading your reply io a few 
niggles' from Phillip Miller. You 
said there was a bug in the 



c.isaetle version. I received my 

Elite from you in spring when I 

subscribed. Is mine a dud or 

OK? 

Simon Hewlett 

York 

tf the word 'Metropolitan' is 
printed on your cassette, it's the 
bag-tree version. If not, send it 
direct to Firebird - not to its - 
for it to be replaced. 




" I THlj^ IT W&& TW£ 

Brand X 

They gel 40%. you gel 94% 
overall. AA might make master - 
mag. but then who would get 
the raves? Can't wail for the 
next issue. 
Jonathan Hurst 
Wiadlesham, Surrey 

Yob should see Bob smiling. 
Thanks. Jonathan. 







8 NOVEMBER 1986 AMSTRAD ACTION i* a parce i 



Without music, graphics 

and sound the Board 

Game has become the 

most popular in the 

world. 
Now it has them. 




"Over 3,000 questions of no vital importance." 







■*■ M. 



Available now on 
Spectrum 4&123K Commodore G4/128K 
BBC B' Amstrad CPC 

Cassette and Disk 



<J^ 




ictwittomm 



and all local stockists 



HOR N ABBOT 

• KMATMINAI 

t ■■> w mrrii mm nwu 



TRIVIAL PURSUIT!* j Trade Mark owned and liccn&cd bj rtttffl rVbbai tmffnalM.mil 1 id 

Published b> Damaik I.imiicd.XM Wcupfc Read, 1 .otidon SW2Q 8PM Tel; 01 W7 562 1 
Trivial PurMiti mi pco^r jnimcd by Oxford Hifiiij! Fiiftrpr*K*. 




DOMARK 



TRACKER by Union Software 

A totafly new concept in computer 
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Versions will differ substantially to make full use Of 
machine capability. Controlling up to 8 remote 
skimmers you must wipe out renegade intelligent 
forces across 5000 trades One to one conitwt is 
featured m fast 3D 

STARGLfDER by Argonaut Software 

A true arcade quality BO combat flight ymuJator at 
the first order A high action product with novefld 
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realistic sound effects and true 3-D perspective, 

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SILICON DREAMS A modem space adventure. 

Tbpse sizeable adventurer dfe in three parts and 
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THE PAWN by Magnetic Scrolls 

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THE MUSIC SYSTEM AND ADVANCED 

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The best music programs for Commodore and 

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RAIN0/RD SOHWAfiE IS A DMSfON OF 
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OCTOBER 1986 ^ 



DIGITAL 

INTEGRATION 



SI ONI 






RE- ACTION 



Biggies megagame, 
megaiine reminder 

If you buy Rig-gleg (disc) you gat 
a totally free megagame. Well, 
that's what the very sriiooth- 
scrolling message told me any- 
way. If you type Run "tunnie" 
you will see for yourself. 

When my subscription 
ends will I be notified? I can't 
remember which issue I sub- 
scribed from, and I wouldn't 
like to misg an issue of my 
favourite magazine. 
Andrew Soar 
Diss, Norfolk 

We've seen Biggies only on 
cassette, so tanff Mirrorsoft to 
Check your tip, Andrew. All hell 
broke loose. Turned out an 
■adolescent spoofer' working 
lor their firm of duplicators 
sneaked the so-called ir^j- 
game onto copies ofS&i Combai 
as Well - a See-what-f-wrote bit 
of arcade action, 

H won't happen again. 
(Pause for dust to settle.) Bat 
don't be sad; 'it wasn't good 
enough for anyone to be disap- 
pointed.' said Mirrorsoft 's Pat 
Bitten. The lad concerned will 
have to read the next letter. 

As for your sob, yes: yon 
get a reminder letter with your 
second-fiom-last issue. How. it 
you buy a binder (£3*95, advt) 
you always know how many of 
the 12 spaces are left, In your 
case, subscriber number 2B59 (I 
looked you up), Feb will be 
your final. $0 this 19 an Extra 
Reminder and you will have No 
Excuse. 




Entrepreneur 

Over (he la&i few months I have 
noticed thai some of the games 
you review have been written 
and sold by tha same person. 1 
have written a few games using 
Laset Basic and Compiler and 
want to sell ihGrn myself, but my 
mother says that you have to be 
licensed Or something. Is this 
true? If so could you tell me 
what to do about it - and don't 
say, 'Send them to a software 
house to be published/ because 
1 don't want to. 

By tho way,, 1 have ju3t fed 
my cats with US Gold's World 
Cup Carnival* it was so bad! I 
bought it a few days before 



youi warning came out. What a 
load of rubbish! The original 
isn't much good either. 
Justin Mason 
Shank lin, Isle of Wight 

You don't have to have a lic- 
ense, Justin, but you won't make 
any money out of it. Selling mail' 
order from home opens you up 
to a)i sorts of hassles, especially 
nasty people wanting their 
money back. It just doesn't 
seem possible anymore to 
break into tho software market 
on a shoestring budget: the big 
houses, with th&iz massive ad- 
vertising budgets, have such a 
stranglehold on the market. 
Your best bet might be to try 
contacting some of the small 
user-groups magazines (see last 
month's Reaction). Perhaps we 
should do an article on this topic 
in a future issue. 




fl I'm Ppc&R.*tfSMirf& H" 
TO PP^VJ tAproot4S F»P- 



Buy, by Mr Muff 

Its Andrew Duff here! That's 
Duff and not Putt, as seen in 
issue 11. Please print my name 
correctly if, buy a 

9.97561338 * IQSSio 1 chance. ii 
is published^ 

In your mail-order system, 
can you order games from ear- 
lier issues than the present one? 
Andrew Dull 
Tain, Ross-shire 

Enough. Mr Xuff, don 't get in a 
huff and we won't talk rough 
about handwriting. 

Of the stuff we re offered, 
all but lour are shl! in stock or. 
cun be obtained {allow a bit oi 
extra time) from our suppliers. 
As for Mexico 36* Big-League 
Soccer. Ales Higgins World 
Pool And AH Snooker - tough. 




VHP **?** R?fl IWe i<j«4* FpO^ 
***tTrI|fK> Of- f*i I^MCVATION ' 

What moan? 

Please could you tell me just 
one thing: what is it that wc 664 
owners are supposed to be 
moaning about? Is it because the 

computer has been withdrawn 
or because the 6123 was 
brought out after (he G64? In fact 
wo ale not moaning. Perhaps 
464 owners will put their brains 
into gear before they open their 
mouths. 
AC Smith 
Sunderland 

As j Smeets of Venlo (Neth- 
erlands) wrote in May: 'Would 
that moaning moanies moaning 

about the moaning nxoanics that 
moan about their G64, please 
stop moaning! ' 



Arnold and the 8256 is Joyce, 
Simon Donne 
Newbury, Berks 

Call it what you like; it can'/ 
hcai you. 

But seriously though, all the 
CPC machines (464, SS4 and 
6129) are nicknamed Arnold. 
Don't worry about why: f 
wouldn't want to burden you 
with the story of some prat back 
in the mists of time who did an 
anagram on Roland Perry, the 
man most responsible for devel- 
oping the CPC range. Even 
more boring: Joyce was Alan 
Sugar 's Secretary. 

Do not ask what CPC stands 
for. Colour personal computet? 
Possibly, but ii doesn t stand for 
anything unpleasant in any lan- 
guage we could think of. Wo 
have no theory about the initial 
'&' in&138. 







Call me anything but 
not too late for lunch 

I'd like to know what my CPC 
6128 is called, if the 464 is 




F THAT4 t*?T r**f paw^ -T(4£ 
Tneip AWftTp.*!? . ' 

Trans-temporal 

The July issue says Disc SO is 
tested on page 66. but my copy 
has the end of the Toadruimer 
review and Jtock'n wrestle. In 
the September issue, one of the 
leter* mentions your review of 
Disc SO, so it appears that some 
got it and some didn't. I am 
tempted to buy the program as 
n seems very good value for 
money. Could you please lot me 
have a copy of the Action Teat to 
help make up my mind? 
K Wilson 
Anglesey 

Through a timewarp the review 
landed or. page 62 of the August 
issue. Fez a quid (plus 35p for 
stamps etc) we can post you a 
back copy. That'll leach you to 
miss a month of the mega-magt 



a*.™* AMSTEAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 13 




Real Amstrad action 
at the PCW Show 



The first wook of September 
saw Be nam's largest computer 
show of the year - the 9th Per- 
sonal Computer World Show. In 
the spacious but hot halls of 
Olympia lit London, we at 
Amstrad Action had a ring-side 
seat: for the first time we were 
exhibitors as well as attenders. 

The reason for our modes! 
stand, on the upper gallery 
above mo massive pavilions of 
Amatrad and Sinclair, was the 
launch of our new titles - 3000 
Plus and PC Plus, monthly 
magazines devoted to the 
Amatrad PCW and PC ranges 
respectively. 

Our liming, fortunately, was 
perfect. On the Amstrad aland 
visitors were seeing the new 



PC 131 2 for the first lime. In PC 
Plus they could rend the full 
details from the press launch die 
day before. 

It was hot-deadline action 
like a daily newspaper. Two 
pages of PC Pius had been held 
open foT Man's report from (he 
launch. Matt phoned details to 
Chris down at the Old Bam: a 
motorbike raced to the printer 
with photos; presses ran 
enough copies overnight to sat- 
isfy demand for the rest of the 
show. It was hectic but wo made 
it in the end! 

Also on sale was last 
month's issue of Amstrad Ac- 
tion, with the seven-page spec- 
ial feature on music, 'Wired for 
Sound'. By coincidence^ we 



happened to be next-door to 
EMK - producers of the Mid- 
itrack Performer package re- 
viewed in that issue - and were 
treated to the full blast of the 
package's power every second 
of the day. It was certainly a 
Crowd-puller, but at times we 
wouldn't have minded the more 
peaceful tones of a quiet game 
of Space In vadoiis. 

The star Df the show was 
Amatrad with the new PC. 
Amstrad s stand was usually 
more crowded than a student- 
union bar. Atari made a good 
effort with the 'Atari Village', 
and the Sinclair stand showed 
the new Spectrum -2. With 
games houses showing their 
wares, the odd robot accosting 
the unwary and the sun blazing 
down through the glass roof, it 
was a ha f occasion in every 
sense of the word. 



*K; 




GAMES GALORE 

As might have been expected, 
there were no shortage of new 
games on display at the Shew 
-and some Impressive stands 
from the bigger companies 
toe. It was guite easy to wan- 
der around trying your hand 
at any of the thousands of 
titles en show, bat not so easy 
to son out the new launches 
for the Amstrad from the 

vSuJL 

Ocean released its 
schedule for the real of the year, 
kicking off by announcing the 
imminent arrival of Mlsjtu Viet 
at a price of ££.35, As its name 
implies this is the official game 
of the popular TV series, in 
which you guide Crockett and 
Tubbs undercover in the build 
up to the big bust. It is styled as 
an 'arcade adventure 1 , and we 
look forward to reviewing it 
soon. Also licensed from (he 
film lor release this month is 
Highlander at £8.95. Coming in 
November is Cobra, at the same 
price and based on you 
guessed it - Stallone's latest 
b(*at-envup; and December 
should see the release of Shoxi 
CiicuH, based on the Si/Hi 
movie of the same name. 

Moving over to Imagine 
sees the release this month of 
Ga/van, based on the arcade 
game, and Kommi's Golf, both 
at a price of £8.96. October sees 
the release of Mag M**, Fie At 
Kung Fu U snd Terra Cs&aut t ail 
based on arcade classics and all 
priced at £8,95, To round off this 
arcade game month Imagine 
should be releasing Kon&ml's 
Coin-Op Mite, a compilation of 



v > 



Spectrum -t-2 
revealed 

Much as it tears at the heart to 
mention a rival computer, Sin- 
clair is now part of the Amstrad 
corporation and the new Sin- 
clair machine, the ZX Spectrum 
4 2, could be a direct competi- 
tor to the Amstrad CPC464. So 
here goes,, 

The Spectrum - 1 is; the first 
new Sinclair product to emerge 
since Amslrad's takeover: the 
new ownership shows. The new 
machine is basically the old 
Spectrum 128K Plus with a dec- 
ent keyboard, a built-in data 
recorder and two joystick ports. 
It is compatible with most of the 
older Spectrum add-ons. appa- 
rently to the extent of still not 
taking standard joysticks. 

It is priced at £149, which is 
£30 less than the older Spectrum 
Plus. It will probably do well if 



only because of the huge range 
of games available for the Sin- 
clair machines. It is an unfortu- 
nate fact of life thai., even now, 
many games are released 
quicker and cheaper for the 
Spectrum than for the Arnold - 
as your letters frequently point 
Out 

II has to be seen as compe- 
tition for the CPC464 on price 
alone. Amstrad is quick to point 
out that the 464 comes with a 
monitor as well, but it is £50 
dearer with a mono serein. *nd 
£150 more with the colour 
screen. 

Amstrad has said there are 
no plans to discontinue the 464. 
and that it is still selling well. 

The good news is thai, 
aside from the huge software 
library, the Arnold is a better 
computer all round. Graphic re- 
solution of the Arnold is 
640 "200 in two colours, 
320*200 in [our colours, or 



160 * 200 in 16 colours. The 
Spectrum can offer a pixel reso- 
lution of £56 * 132 with eight 
colours, but suffers from an un- 
fortunate disease known as 
"attribute clash 1 . This means that 
any eigbt-by-eight pure) grid 
can contain only two colours, 
which severely limits, the colour 
graphic capability, and makes 
Spectrum games look much less 
vibrant chart those for Arnold. 

The other serious limitation 
of the Spectrum is its Basic: 
slow, limited and non-standard. 
Locomotive Basic, on the 
other hand, is acknow- 
ledged to be one of 
the best around and 
almost as fast as mat 
of Acorn's BBC 
range. 

We will 
monitor the 
effect of 
this 



machine on the Arnold 
closely over Ihe next months 
and if any of you hear of any 
problems with software or hard- 
ware availability, let US know. 






14 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 w.^ P .e, M ... 




AMSCENE 



their best-selling versions 
arcade classics- And finally. De- 
cember sees the launch of that 
classic Donkey Kong - the off- 
icial version for the Amsbrad- 

Qn the CM. stand you 
could see snippets Of new re- 
leases from the company - 
though you had so stand well 
back as they were being shown, 
an a bank Of 20 TV screens. 
Denis Ex Ma^hina was being 
previewed* an unusual 'multi- 
media" experience that comes 
complete with accompanying 
tape featuring the voices and 
music of many well-known stars. 



Archers on cloud 9 

The Level & stand at the PCW 
Show was a little different this 
time round, as it was the 
company's fifth birthday. By 
way of celebration the stand had 
been turned into a kind of 
museum of computer history. 
Computer veterans could de- 
light at the sight of a Nascom. 
while the res! of us took in the 
power of the Amiga, 

But it wasn't all blasts from 
the past. Mosaic Publishing re- 
vealed The Archers, written by 
Level 9, which is an adventure 
based on the perennial radio 
serial of the same name. In the 
game you lake the part of the 
Archers' story editor, making 
the plot decisions for Eddie 
Grundy, Jack Woolley, Nelson 
Gabriel and Elisabeth Archer. 
(What do you mean, you've 
never heard of them?) As the 
plot unfolds you have (o face the 
consequences - which appa 



Also due for release, this time 
on Halloween. October 31st, is 
the lex! adventure Dracuta. 
Based on the book by Bram 
Stoker H wa* written by Rod 
Pike, author of Pilgrim. It will 
cost £7.35 on cassette, 

On thq Marleen stand 
could be seen Uctii Mat*. a, judo 
simulation written with Hie help 
of Brian Jack* - a 7th Dm expert 
who has won the British Cham- 
pionship 1 1 time* and holds an 
Olympic medal in throwing 
people on rubber mats The 
game offers one or two player 
options and costs £9.93 on cass- 
ette and £13 $5 on disk. 

On the Rainbisd stand, 
aside from the excellent Music 
System and Advanced Music Sy- 
stem, reviewed in our October 
issue, and Arr Studio, the cover 
story for this issue; one could 
gase at the stunning graphics of 
S'.arghdei from Argonaut Soft- 
ware lor the Atari ST. The good 
news is that this is under devel- 
opment for the Amattad CPC 
range on both cassette and disk, 
and looks worth waiting for. 

Gremlin Graphics was 
previewing its Christinas range, 
starting with Footballer of the 
rear. This is not jus! another 
soccer simulation (or sO they 
Claim!), but sees you starting off 
at the age of 17 in a Fourth 
Division Team with £300 and tan 
goal cards in your pocket, and 
the footballing world at your 
feat. The aim is to develop your 
career until you become Foot- 




rently include memos from the 
controller of Radio 4. The text 
was written by members of the 
Archers seriptw riling team, so 
should have the full flavour of 
the original. 

Looking to the future, Level 
9 is working On a mult -user 
dungeon which runs on networ- 
ked Amigas; users access it via 
modem- Codenamed 'Avaion" it 
could be on-line sometime early 
next year - and should be well 
worth logging onto. 



bailer of the Year- It lb schedu- 
led for September release at 
£9,93. 

Due early November is 
Tr& iifria xer, in which you play 
what appears to be z football. 
The best description is possibly 
an 'action roll-around'. Follow- 
ing this comes future Knight, a 
futuristic twenty-level action 
game Set in the ruins of a 
wrecked star cruiser. At the 
same time Avenger is schedu- 



led, for release, an arcade ad- 
venture following in the Way of 
the Tigier series. 




£60 Music Machine 
has sound sampling 

One stand at the Oiympia show 
making almost as much noise as 
that of EMR was Ram 
Electronics. This might have 
had something to do with the 
fact that Ram was showing a 
product in direct competition 
with EMR's Miditrzdc 

Performer. 

Ram's £60 Music Machine is 
a Midi-based music system that 
comes complete with interface, 
software on cassette ox disk, 
and even a microphone (though 
the price for the Amstrad ver- 
sion had not been set at the 
tune). 

The microphone is in- 
cluded because Music Machine 
offers 'sound sampling', a tech- 
nique whereby natural sounds 
can be recorded digitally and 
Subsequently manipulated by 
the software. 

The package also offers 
eight built-ui sounds including 



drums and piano, and a drum 
section with real sounds and a 
rhythm editor. The Midi inter- 
face allows you to control fully- 
fledged Midi synthesisers. And 
an earphone socket lets you lis- 
ten to the results in the privacy 
of your own head. 

Further details from Ram 
Electronics on (0252) SS 003). 
We hope to review one soon! 



AND THE NEXT 
SHOW 

If you haven't already had 
enough of computer shows, 
the next one is scheduled for 
October 3rd to 5th al the 
Novotel, Hammer smith, 

London. 

This show is dedicated to 
Amstrad owner*, with mote 
thaa 75 exhibitors to peruse 
and annoy. The organisers are 
predicting a turn-out ■ 
around J 5.000 enthusiasts - 
and we will certainty he 
among them. 



ofifHiu-nuwuifteiiu* AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 IS 



AMSCENE 




nosntc 

PUBUSHIHG 
LTD 






187 Upper Street 

IsJington 
London M 1RQ 
Tel: 01 -226 0838 



THRILLER 

Thriller writer Dick Francis is 
soon to join Frederick Forsyth 
on the computer screen with 

Screen vision 

In between your nightly sei- 
stone of game-playing, it may 
have occassional occurred to 
you that it might be nice to be 
able lo watch your favourite TV 
programme on Arnold's moni- 
tor. WeU - now you can, thanks 
lo Sereenvisian from Screens 
Microcomputer Distribution' 



Mowc Publuhing'i TWeeShy- 
77i» Computet Game A tra- 
ditional «,dventure game com 
bined with ■ hone-racing simul- 
ation (I gueas you're just got to 
read the book!), Ttoic* Shy has 
been written by the Ramjam 
Gorporarioii- 

You take the pert of teacher 
Jonathan Deny who haa come 
into possesion of some inarigv- 
itig computer tape* - your job is 
to find out whet they do and get 
them back to She owner. Need 
leea to aay (here are a host of 
shady characters from the 
seamy side of the horse- racing 
business trying to stop you. If 
you cart make your way to (he 
horse track you can place your 
bets and watch the race. If you 
win you return to the adventure 
with some much-needed cash in 
your pocket. This part of the 
game can be played by itself if 
yon went to practice. 

Twice Shy will be available 
on cassette for £9,96. A disk 
version will follow si £12.8&. 



Sereentisien is a slimline 
box thai you plug your monitor 
into, and contains all the circui- 
try necessary to bring Dallas to 
an Arnold near you. It costs 
£89-93, so it might be easier lo 
buy a second-hand telly, but for 
further details contact Screens 
on (061274) 20664. 



DAN DARE 
PROBLEMS 

A little note arrived on our desk 
from those nice people at Virgin 
Games. For (hose of you who 

haven't ilready worked if out. 



loading Dan Dare from disk re- 
quires iCPM and not 
RtJN"DISC, as displayed on the 
packet. Thanks, Virgin? 




NOT PURE FICTION 



This may seem an odd place to 
find art item about the 48th 
Worid Science Fiction Canve-n- 
tfon, but there ia a special re- 
ason. The organisers of Conspi- 
racy '07. to give its more man- 
ageable title, have asked us to 
point out that computers will 
feature quite heavily this time, 
as there will be a whole suite of 
rooms at the Metropole given 
over to them. 

The rooms will contain a 
number of hardware and soft- 
ware houses stands, together 
with lectures, discussions and 
workshops on the relationship 
between the two fields. Compe- 
titions are promised, and all in 
all this should prove a show 
with a difference. 

The main event at the show 
is (he Hugo Award ceremony, 
which needs no introduction lo 
anyone remotely interested in 
Scenes Fiction On the lighter 
side there is theatre and a cos- 
tume competition - which has 
apparently been known to take 
over six hours. Guests of 
honour include Doris Leasing, 
Alfred Bester and Brian Aldiss, 
while Jim Burns' artwork pro- 
vides graphic backdrop and 



Dave Langtord (columnist in 
0000 PLUS, amongst other 
things) provides the humour. 

The bad news Is that the 
event doesn't take place for 



another year - so mark it down 
fox 37th August to 1st Septem- 
ber 1987 at the Metropole and 
Brighton Centre. Brighton. 




16 NOVEMBER 1986 AMSTRAD ACTION So «« » i» MHwd 




axwell House, 
4 Worship Street 
2A2EN. 



UBUCATION 
TOBER 



AmstradCPC 

£8,95 tape 

£13.85disk 




I 



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Macabre Mechlabs infested with genetic 
horrors hinder Sold, a synthetic man, and 
Nejo. a human baby as they figtit their way 
through the nightmare zones created by 
Wardlock the Machine Sorcerer to house his 
ghastly flesh experiments, the Gfobewels and 
Bicbentes. 

An outstanding achievement of graphics and 
animation, PRODIGY , lakes you into the 
Mechlsos of Mechworld where you must guide 
Solo the Syntleman through the Ice Zone, Fire 
Zone, Tech Zone and Vegie Zone, in tits quest 
lor escape. 

Solo has 10 look after the needs of Nejo , 
cleaning him up. feeding him and protecting 
him as they make their way through intelligent 
mazes, teieporters, buildings with strange 
geometries and the uncanny vegetation created 



ELECTRIC DREAMS S> 



■MfVPP 



MGES NAPPY 



by the sorcerer Ward lock, who, as a machine 
being, is malevolent towards organic life, 
PRODIGY is a game which demands 
compassion, guts and intelligence in ways no 
other game does 



0^ 



Intelligent Mans 

Weird self -motivated animated aliens with 
simulated intelligence. 

3D 4-way scrolling landscapes. 

An outstanding musical soundtrack 
combined with stunning sound effects . 




ZXSP!CTRUM48K/128K/-f £7.99 

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TON CRESCENT. SOUTHAMPTON, HAMPSHIRE S01 2EW. TEL (0703) 223694 



Mail Order I Kti.tiv.DrMm. Software, ? 3 Pond Street. Hampst&wl. I otilon NW3 2PN 



YOU! 




Serious Software is now devoted totally to the CPC range, and we need 
your help! 



With our new magazine 8000 Plus being devoted 
totally to owners of the PCW 8256 and S512, we on 
A A can devote oil owr pages to the CPC range: the 
464, 664 and 61 28. Thi* means that changes are 
needed to Serious Software. 

Although the PCW became the star of Senoua Software, this 
does not mean thai Amstrad Action is purely a games mag now. 
Serious Software still covers what business packages come out 
for the CPC models, but can devote more space to other aspects 
of home computing such .is programming, type-ms, hints and 
tips, conuns, graphics and music. 

We would like your help with Set jo us Software: after all it's 
you t mag. Send us your Type-ins. We are looking for quality 
listings thai show elegant use of Basic or even machine -cede. 
We will print them if they are worth typing in. Use the form on 
page 96 and remember, we pay for what we print, 

Having problems with &asic? Can't persuade your printer 
lo prinl? Worried about WordStar? Then write io Problem 

OUR ADDRESS 

Address your correspondence 
to Type-in*, Problem Attic, 
Hot Tips or A Day in the Life 



Attic, Amstrad Action at the Old Bam We will print what 
problems we can. and if we can't answer them ourselves then 
maybe one of our multitude of readers can - and if they can't 
they might like to read ihe reply, Em please don't ask us for 
solutions to games. If we printed those it might spoil the game 
for others, and there might not be room in AA lor anything else! 

Send us your hints and tips. II you've found any neat tricks 
to use in Basic, WordStar, Graphic Adventure Creator, Quill, 
dBasell. or machine-code or just want to show oU - then send 
your tips to Hot Tips, Amstxad Action, al the Old Barn. 

And if you are using your CPC to conlrol your tram set. run 
your business, play in a rock'n'roll band, or anything else that 
you might like to tell us about, the address is A Day in the Life, 
Amstrad Action, at the same address. The series kicks off with 
a look at how we produce Amstrad Action on Arnolds, but we 
would rather hear from you Tell us what you are up to in 
anything from five to 500 words, and we will let the cat out of the 
bag. Please include your phone number too. so that we can 
contact you should we need more deiatis. 

CPC owners, this mag's totally for your 

Amstrad Action, Future 
Publishing Limited, Brunei 
Precinct, Somerton, Somerset, 
TAI1 SAB 



SERIOUS SOFTWARE TOP TEN| 






Thi 


9 chart created by A A 


readers 






The 

rronlh 


Last 

month % of miss 


Title 


Software house 






1. 


1 


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GRAPHIC ADVENTURE CREATOR incentive 




2. 


7 


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And Graphic Advenntro Creator is stil at number one, with I'm not going to say anything else about East Amsword. 
over quarter of you out them reckoning it lo be f\o best then? doesn't seem to be a tot of point But Discovery 

thing since sliced bread. What is happening to all these has certainly dashed in there, in the number four 
adventures then? Tell us, please, what you are creating position. If you want your vote included in these charts, 
on GAC and we will let everyone else know. use the form on page 96. 



... AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER L986 19 



TARZAN f *™d hy HlX«AJt RICE BURROUGHS. INC. 
And t'wl b* IVrmusi'Mi 




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Absolut 

Bgcj 



e 



inners 



More on printing this month, 
as Andrew Wilton continues 
our crash course in Basic 





PART 7 



SHORT-CUTS 

The PRINT command is one of the most commonly used features 
of Basic Because of this, a lot of abbreviations have developed 
over the years, to save time typing programs in. Sight back in 
Part 1 we saw how you can save time by typing a question-mark 
instead of the command itself. 

The command :£ stili pretty cumbersome to use Try this 
little program: 

icroat-itoio 

20 ftMNT "TMb ia mesttge »s»t*r 

30PEIKTJ»; 

40 k&mT * oat of* total of ten' ■ 

SO NEXT b 

Even using question-marks, that's a bit long-winded for such a 
simple operation, L' you wanted to do all that printing in one 
program line, you'd end up typing: 




n 



?"This fc message number ";;? b;:? M oat of a total c 

Notice the way you have to put semicolons to stop Arnold from 
moving down a line, immediately followed by colons to sepa- 
rate it from The next PRINT command. 

In fact, you don't have to do anyihirig so complex if you 
want to print a whole load of things on one line of the screen - 
be they messages, variable values or whatever - you only need 
one PRINT command for the lot of them. That dreadful line 
above becomes; 






?*'This fc m««sage nunabe*"jb 



This time you don'i need any colon*, because you're not trying 
to separate different commands. The only command in the line 
is (he question-mark at the beginning, meaning 'PRINT'. The 
rest of the line is just the material you want printed - we call this 
the piintiiat. The semicolons between the different items not 
only separate them, but also make sure Arnold prints them all 
on the same line of the screen. 

Although PRINT was one of the very first commands we 
covered in Absolute Beginners Part 1 , we saw it there only in its 
simplest foim. When we met FGR-NEXT loops a couple of 
issues back, we came across another use of PRINT, This little 
program shows both forms of PRINT command at work: 



lftramr "Aad now for is whole load of numbers!" 
a m 1 to ttfr 

fa 

minuet* 

The PRINT commands in lines 10 and 50 each put a message on 
screen, while the one in line 30 prints out the value of the loop 
variable 'a' for each pass through the FOR-NEXT loop. 

This much you've seen before in other forma* Now try 
typing in a new line between lines 20 and 30: 



» 



"Numb** "; 




Note the semicolon at the end of the line, Don't put a colon there 
by mistake, or you'll miss the point of the exercise. 

You won't be surprised to find that line 2S prints the 
message Number ' on screen, Line 30 then prints the value of 
V, but on the same Line of the screen thai the 'Number ' 
message went on - and this is new. Up till now, each PRINT 
message has gone on its own separate line of the screen. 

Every lime Arnold gets a PRINT command, he puts the 
message (or variable value or whatever) on screen and then 
moves down a line. He does this because he assumes you'll 
want the next message printed on a separate line. You can see 
this very clearly indeed if you add this new line 35 to the 
program: 



35 PRINT 



When you now run the program you'll find it leaves a blank line 
after each 'Number such-and-such' message. The PRINT com- 
mand in line 33 makes Arnold move down io the next line of the 
screen, even though there isn't any message tor him to print. 

As we've seen, Arnold assumes thai he's supposed to move 
down a line after each PRINT command. Sometimes you won't 
want him to do this, so you'll have to tell him not to. That 
semicolon on the end of line 25 tells Arnold to stay on the same 
line, and this means that line 30 prints the value of "a 1 on the 
same line as each 'Number ' message. 

IF... 

Let's use our new knowledge of printing straightaway, Type 

this program in and run it: 

IB FOR c-1 TO 10 

! "There will be «;10-c;" mora messages like Oil*" 

m 



: w 



► 



.!«« tern**..... AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 21 



SPECIAL 



Mathematically, this ia always going to be right. The expression 
1 10-c' in line 20 always works out as the number of messages 
Bull to Joe printed. Grammatically though, it 'a got one slight 
problem: the last message but one will read, "There will be 1 
more messages like this', and that's not terribly good English, 

Edit line 20 and add a new line 35, so that the two run as 
follows; 









■:-■'-' „:■■ v . : . ' >: v. : . r :Y .-.■ " 

or v?**! to S" ELSE 



Now Arnold gets it right, and yon get your first look at three 
extremely powerful commands IF, THEN and ELSE. These 
give you much more control over Arnold than you've had so 
far. 

Up till now, Arnold has done precisely what yon told him to 
do. He hasn't been at all intelligent about this: he's just blindly 
followed your orders. With IF, THEN and ELSE, all this changes. 
If you want Arnold to do something in a particular set of 
circumstances only, you can tell him so. The command 'IF a = 40 
THEN PRINT b 1 tells Arnold to print the value of the variable "b". 
but only if "a' has a value of 40. If 'a' does not have a value of 40, 
then Arnold ignores the PRINT command altogether. 

Suppose we had a line reading TF a- 40 THEN PRINT b'. 
On its own the command "PRINT b" would tell Arnold to display 
the value of the variable "b* on the screen, but that 'IF a ^40 
THEN ...■ qualifies things. It tells Arnold that he should obey the 
'PRINT fa' only if 'a' has a value of 40- 

We call "a - 40* the condition of the IF-THEN command. 
Don't mistake it for an assignment command; they may look 
similar, but conditions and assignments are completely differ- 
ent. The condition 'a — 40' doesn't change the value of "a 1 - it just 
tests it. 

When Arnold comes across an IF command, he evaluates 
the condition. That is. he checks to see whether or not it's true. If 
the condition is true - if 'a' is equal to 40, or '10-c' is equal to 1 
in the earlier example - Arnold finds the command after THEN 
and performs it. 

So much for IF and THEN, but what about ELSE? Well, just 
as THEN tells Arnold what to do if the condition is true, ELSE 
tells him what to do if it's false. In line 25 above, the THEN 
command tells him to print the first message while the ELSE iells 
him to print the second one. He chooses between them using the 
condition, 

If the condition *10-c- V is true - if '10-c' does equal 1, in 
other words - Arnold prints the first message, as the THEN 
command instructs him. If it's false, however, he ignores THEN 
and the PRINT command which follows it. Instead he prints the 
second message, because that's what ELSE tells him to do- 

Let's look at another example of IF- THEN-ELSE programm- 
ing, This time there's a very important job for an IF-THEN 
command to do. First of all. here's the listing without an IF- 
THEN: 



!**»** 




Z» FOR :*« 4 tO 9 StEF -1 




3» *EBtT «'> divided by "*;" eqi 


■»to*Wfc 


46 NEXT b 





That 'STEP -1' means that the value of the loop variable "b' 
counts downwards, in this case from four to zero. When the 
value of 'b' gels to zero, Arnold gels into problems with line 30. 

The last item in line 3-0's printlist is "a/b* - the value of 'a' 
divided by the value of 'b 1 , in other words. Since 'b' is zero on 
the Ust run through, Arnold tries to divide the value of a' by 
zero and print the result, He can't do this properly, because 
dividing a number by sero is a mathematical impossibility. 
Instead he prints up the error message 'Division by zero' , along 
with a non&onsc value for 'a/b' 

By substituting in a new line 30 with a suitable IF-THEN 
command in it we can avoid this problem. What we want is a 
line which testa for the loop variable 'b' being equal to zero, 
puts up a special message if it is zero, or just carries on with the 
division if it isn't 

You should now have a fair idea what the new line 30 is 



going to look like. It will be something like 'IF (b is zero) THEN 
(print a special message) ELSE (do what the old line 30 did)'. 
See if you can work out a Brushed line 30 for yourself. 

MORE CONDITIONS 

We've seen how Arnold can cope with TF-conditions like "a = 40' 
or "10-c** 1'. but he's a lot more flexible than this. Try typing 
this program in and running it: 

IGFGBd-lTOIQ 

20 IF d*5 THEN PRINT 4f> i* !«*• 

isn't" 

JftHEXTd 





The Sign '<■.' is the less-ihan sign. So 'IF d<5' reads 'if d is less 
than 5*. When "d" is less than $ Arnold obeys the first PRINT 
command and the rest of the time he obeys the second one. 

There's a corresponding V sign which means greater- 
than, and together these two signs are called inequalities. (To 
remember which is which, you can think of a megaphone: small 
sound at smaller end, big noise at big end.) 

Notice what happens in the above program when d is equal 
to 5: Arnold obeys the second of the two PRINT commands, 
because less than' is a strict condition- If you mean 'less than or 
equal to' you must use the less-than and equals signs together, 
like this: 

26 MONT "The rt will be "; 10-c; 

25 IF J4-e*l THEN PRINT "nan message like tWs" 

fHIKT '*»w*» weswg** ilk* *is" 

You can do the same with the greater-than and equals 
signs, and in both cages it doesn't matter which way round the 
signs go: "> = ' and " — >' mean the same thing. 

The most useful combination of signs is npt-equ$} t which 
you make with the greater-than and less-titan signs like so: '<>'. 

Often you'll find you can get the same results two different 
ways with an IF-THEN-ELSE command. As far as Arnold is 
concerned, 'IF a- I THEN b- 1 ELSE b=Z' is the same as "IF 
aol THEN b= 2 ELSEb= 1*. 



SUMMARY 

The PRINT command normally puts each printed message on a 
new line. If you follow the message with a semicolon ( ; ) Arnold 
will print the next message on the same line- 

You can print a series of messages with one PRINT 
command, putting them in a piinthsl. 

The commands IF, THEN and ELSE let you specify alterna- 
tive commands to be performed m different circumstances. A 
line using IF goes "IF (condition) THEN (first command) ELSE 
(second command) 1 ■ 

The condition is something like "a 30' or l h<lQ\ and tells 
Arnold how to choose which command he should obey - the 
first one or the second, that is. If the condition is true - if 'a' has a 
value of 30 or *b* has a value of less than 10* in the two e jcamptes 
then he will obey the nrsl command. Otherwise, he'll obey the 
second One. 

The 'ELSE (second command)' part of an ff-THEN-ELSE hue 
is optional. If there's no ELSE command and the condition is 
false, Arnold will just go on to the next line. 

Types of condition (with some examples): 



equals 



less than 



greater than 



Ca>'.b' means a is less than 
b') 



< less than or equal to ('a< - h' means a is less 

than or equal to b*) 



greater than or equal to 



not equal 



('lob' means 'a isn't equal 
tob*) 



22 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 w. ^ rt b«]d t 



GAMES AT THE 



SPEED OF LIGHT. 



■^SKsv 



//r^ v 



LIGHTFORCE is for VENGEANCE. ..,„. = ,... 
LIGHTFORCE is the Punishment Aim of 
Galactic Fighter Command, 
When a Terran-settled system at the edge of 
the galaxy is seized by an alien force, revenge 
comes in the form of a lone 
LIGHTFORCE fighter. 
LIGHTFORCE confronts alien in a dazzling 
battle above the strange landscapes of the 
Ice-Planet.ihe Jungle Planet, Alien factories 
and the im p ass abl e Aste r oid B elt . » 
LIGHTFORCE — at the speed of Light 
- from FTL. 













I 



SHOCKWAY RIDERS are the pick of the * 

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SHOCKWAY RIDER is the most original 

arcade game 1 of the y^r - 

THE ULTIMATE FUTURE SHOCK!! 



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R'THI T LIGHT ftl faster than light, carter follis group of companies. 

-i SEDGLEY ROAD EAST, TIPTOM WEST MIDLANDS DY4 7UJ. Tel: 021 -520 23 8 T 14 lines) 



If you have followed this series through from Part On*, 
you will bo pleased to hear that you are now in a 



go of CP/M - by doing some * housekeeping 1 . This 
doesn't mean you have to get the Hoover out, but 
refers to the practice of keeping your disks in order and 
using them efficiently for storing programs and 
documents. 

When you buy a program - a word-processor, a database or a 
computer language for example - what you are buying is a 
'master' disk mat contains the program files you need, and 
probably some sample files arid maybe a tutorial to set you on 
your feet. It is good practice to make botli a 'backup' of the 
master disk (or dicks), so that you don't corrupt it, and a 'work' 
disk which you use from day to day. 

We have already touched on the subject of backups in Part 
Three of this series. We made a backup of your CP/M master 
disk so that you didn't have to keep using your only copy of the 
operating system. To recap briefly, we used the Disckit3 
program (or Disckiffi if you have CP/M version Z.Z rather than 
CP/M Plus) to copy the contents of your master disk onto a blank 
disk. 

The Disckit programs are ideal for making backup copies 
of master disks as they actually copy disks exactly: bit for bit as 
they appear on the master disk. To make a backup copy, first 
insert your CP/M master disk into the built-in drive and boot up 
CP/M. Then enter DI5CKXT2 or DISCKIT3 according to which 
version you have. A menu appears on the screen which is fairly 
self-explanatory - except that the numbers for activating each 
option refer to the function keys and not the numerical keys 
along the top of your keyboard, 

So press the 17 function key to copy a disk. A new menu 
appears asking you which drive contains the disk you wish to 
read from; this is the disk you will be copying from. So press 13 
for the built-in drive, The next menu asks where the disk you 
wish to write to is to be found; the disk you wish to copy to. If 
you have only one drive then press 19. but if you have a second 
drive attached press ft. 

The screen should clear, and ask you to insert the disc you 
wish to WHITE. Remove your CP/M master disk and insert the 
program disk you want to copy, and then press any key. From 
then on just follow the instructions on the screen. If you have a 
single-drive system you have to keep swapping the two disks 
back and forth as Arnold reads chunks of data from the source 
disk into memory, and then copies it back out to the destination 
disk. K you have two drives you can. sit back and watch the 
drive lights flash back and forth as Arnold reads from one disk 
and writes to the other. 

In either case it is a good idea to make sure the protection 
tabs on your master disk are in before you start, in case you get 



muddled up 

between source 

and destination at some 

point after all. Arnold doesn't 

know the difference) 

WORK DISKS 

You now have a backup disk, which is a direct copy 
of the master disk. Put your master disk away somewhere 
safe (if it's really important, in a different building in casr- 
One bums down!). You won't have lo use the master disk 
again unless something gees badly wrong with your backup. 

Put your backup copy into your built-in disk drive and 
enter DIR to look at the disk's file directory. It will probably 
contain quite a number of files, many of which you are unlikely 
to use in day-to-day work and are really just taking up valuable 
disk space that could be better used. 

In particular there may be various files labelled README 
or SAMPLE, or with .DOC or .TXT extensions, that are there to 
help the novice use the program; they are meant to be 
discarded once you know what you are doing. The idea of a 



need from day to day, hopefully leaving you enough space on 
the disk to store the documents and data you will be creating 
while you work. 

The first thing to do is decide which files you are going to 
need. These may be listed m the documentation supplied with 
the package, but as a general rule of thumb you will probably 
need most of the files with a .COM extension. 

For example, if you are working with WordStar you are 
going to need WS.COM as this contains the main program itself. 
You are also likely to need [he 'overlay' files - those with an 
,OVR extension - as these are called by the main program when 
needed. There may well be a short file with the .SUB extension 
which should be on your work disk; we will look at Submit files 
later in this series. Don't be too concerned about missing any 
vital tiles out, as the program should throw up an error message 
if it finds a file missing: a message such as WSLOVR missing 
makes its point quite clearly. 

it is also a good idea, if you have the space, to copy 
DCE.COM from side one of your CP/M system disk onto your 
work disk (or STAT.COM if you are running CP/M version 2.3). 
Having these files on your work disk lets you easily find out how 
much space you have left without the inconvenience of continu- 
ally swapping disks. Having PBP.COM would be useful too, as 
you could copy files from disk to disk without too much 
aggravation. 

CREATING A WORK DISK 

The first stage in creating your work disk is to format a new, 
blank disk and copy the system tracks onto it so that it is a 'boot 
disk' - containing CP/M itself. This is done, again, with the help 
of the Disckit programs. Sun DISCKIT2 or DISCXIT3, but this 
time press f4 to format a disk. Press f9 from the next menu, to 
format your work disk in 'system format*; and the f5 or f5 key 
according to the number of drives you have. Remember your 
built-in drive is A:, and your second drive, if you are so 
privileged, is B:. Follow the instructions on the screen and sit 
back as your new disk is formatted. 

You should now have a freshly formatted disk, pristine 
clean and ready for the files necessary to turn it into a fully- 
fledged work disk. 

So how do you copy the files across? by using the PIP 
command of course, as we learnt in Part Four last month, Start 
by pipping across the PIP.COM file itself, and Dffi.COM from 
your CP/M master disk. Insert your CP/M master disk into the 
built-in drive and enler: 

A.'plp 

*b: ■ pip.com 

*b; - dir.com 



24 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 ^.h^^w)-, 



SPECIAL 



Now enter DIR B: and you should see these two tiles on the 
directory of your work disk. You've now got all you need to do 
the rest using just your work disk, and can put your CP/M 
muter disk away as it won't be needed any more. 

The next stage is to PIP the files you have decided you axe 
going to need from your application program backup disk. You 
should know enough about PIP to do this by yourself by now. 

Remember to keep an eye on how much free apace you've 
got left on your work disk: you want to leave enough apace for 
the file* you Are going to create when you actually sit down to 
some real work, otherwise the whole exercise will be poimtess! 
Remember too that you can always ERAse P1P.COM from your 
work disk when you've finished, and maybe DIK.COM (or 
STAT.COM) too; though this would be a shame as it would mean 
you wouldn't easily be able to check for free apace later on. 

By way of example here is the directory of one of the work 
disks we use on Amstrad Action. 



4 -i ■■ Jir 
A; ME 
At KiTJCIJU 
fls tlUliJU 

*, : t i- t .-.rn 

<4| I'fflN 



Mrl I WBOVLY1 GVR i JlJi'loAVT. BOB j UtHUK:) inj* 



BA». t CSM 1*1 i , lr'*i , #; 

HI t At&uLUiL M 1 tATCHN 

pftf ? I .•'■ 1.1 if I 



- uexoFt i * i lovin i-i 

1 i-ATCIfH i ,' i I .i.L-.O ■ I, i:.i 

■t ftOPC^EH EiVS i >V»Ci."ll W>J 

... i I I C 1* ■ FPLIHKS -ir,h 



i' i ifCi )up:i j* ; i-i.vni uts 



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It is a WordStar disk, containing CPftA as well so that we can 
'boot 1 directly from the disk, but as you can see we don't put 
PIP.COM or STAT.COM on as well. This is partly to save space, 
and also because there is another, rather irregular, way of 
finding out how much free space there is on the disk. First you 
reset Ihe Amstrad by pressing CONTROL, SHIFT and ESC at 
the rjsme time, and then you enter the Amsdos command CAT 
(short for catalogue). Amsdos is the Amstrad disk operating 
system, considerably more basic than CP/M, that is built into 
your Arnold if you have a disk drive attached. Fortunately the 
Cat command lists the files on your disk together with their 
length in kilobytes and the amount of free space left on the disk. 
l( is best to do this before you start work for the day, as you cart 
then boot up CP/M afterwards by entering \CPtA. 

MAKING A LIBRARY 

Once you are actually using your work disk, you will find thai it 
rapidly fills with the document or data files that you create while 
using the word-processor, spreadsheet or whatever program 
you are running. Many programs, including WordStar, create 
backup files of your work every time you save a document. 
These are essentially your previously saved file renamed with 
the BAK extension. The backup of the document you are 
working on at the time should be retained in case of problems, 
but other hies with the extension .BAK can be erased to make 
more room on the disk, 

However, even after you have erased surplus backup files, 
a lime will come when your work disk is totally hul. At this point 
you have a choice: either make a new work disk or create a 
'library' of older files that you might need to refer to again, or 
need just for the record', Which choice you make depends on 
your work pattern. If you are a writer, for example, at any one 
time you really only need to work on your current document, 
Older documents can be filed away for reference. If you are 
runnirig spreadsheets, on the other hand, you might constantly 
need to look at a variety of spreadsheets and so need several 
work disks. 

A 'library' disk is created in much the same way as a work 
disk, only you don't bother to put the program files themselves 
on the disk. A copy of PIP.COM and DfR.COM are quite 
useful files to have on library disks, but not vital, So -^ 

you could end up with nearly 170K space for 
your documenia If your work is easily 
divided into categories- a writer, ^ 
for example, could have 
novels, short stories 




and correspondence - then it might be best to create several 
library disks, using one for each category. 

So, with careful use of PIP and ERAse on your work disks 
and libiary disks you should always have enough room on your 
disks, .uid should always be able to find a file when you want it. 
There's nothing like an organised collection of disks for making 
your working life easier. 

Next month we shall look at more of the wonderful things 
you can do with the PIP command, and at some of the other files 
to be found on your CP/M master disk. And yes, I know that is 
what we were supposed to be doing this month, but you'll just 
have to wait] 



FftOftLEMS WltH A CPC664 



! if ■ yovi ',*r* tap'. UWtWMr Uf « 

! ;CPC8$t ^you are us*Hfu#airtly 
doubJy disadvantaged - you 

[have ie Item itito CP/M £.3 and 
sijo defi't have * copy of 
DSCS3t2. However, . yde* sy- 
stem $aks do contain slher 

; progtisrt* that fulfil the same 

IT Is used to format a 

j blank dj*k in *y**wn format. The 
I prog*a|ri . is -stored in * file - 

4*^;;#0W*A?.G(*«; H yo* 



wish io format your (Stifc m Data 
Formal -', without the System 
tracks - than use the qualifier 
fO*MATD 

DISC COPY is used far copying 
disks if you have a i^ie-drive 
system and, like DISCTQT, Will 
format the disk too if Ous hasn't 
been done already, tit sister 
command is COPYDISC, which 
is used if yon have {wo disk 
drives. 



copying Fats with 

A* w* juejtfioned in Part Four of 
Mot series, copying fus* from 
one disk to another o*ing PIP 
under &/M 2.2 is poasibta only 
! if- ;.you. actually have twe disk 
dritet.;it you only have one 
you at* a bit stuck/but 
/Amsrtrsd has supplied 
another program, 

| MJBCOFY COM,, ■pacilteally 
designed for this purpose. So n? 
| espy a file under CP/M 2.2 yon 
th# command ITLECQPT 



CP/W 1*1 

The utanamo can be ambiguous, 
. ... so it is fruit* OK, for axamp'*, to 
SSy TTLECOVY *.COM if you 
wish (o copy all ihe command 
files from your source disk. The 
screen prompts you quite clear- 
ly when you most change disks 
but again, it i* up to you to keep 
track of Which is (he SOURCE 
dtak and which the 
DESTINATION (It might be 
wise to use the writs-protect tab 
on your source disk.) 



COPY-PROTECTED PROGRAMS 



| Making working copies of your 

using PUP i» itrajghi* 

unl«w» th* waster disk 

t-4» --'Nsb>^p9fw«*<?M^'.- TMs means 

: that a, wave* bit of code on the 

mattas disk prewmts you from 

the fflas v- a system 

to hinder software pi- 

rate* eapitahsisg on otter 

p*cp£s»' m»rk> 

k s)*o makes h difficult lor 

>ple tfke us. who want to 

[intake legitimate copta* ■ for 

i^avd work disks. Unfor- 



tunately there Is little that you 
can do about copyprotected 
programs, entaas in* protection 
is fairly basic. Try doing a 
Dffioctory of ihs master disk. 
One easy form; of protection Is 
flmpiy to kbal fitas "fi/arrama. 
which prevents others frcm 
using the *,* format for pipping 
scroM ali the files on a disk. 
This dan be circumventad hist 
as easily by renaming the 
propriste files. 




AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 25 



SERIOUS SOFTWARE 



your tofmsr ooesr/cw A/vsweeeD. 



PROBLEM ATTIC 



We've had a lot of letters in the Problem Attic postbag 
this month asking about hardware scrolling, and how 
ft can be used in Basic programs. Well, this is rather too 
complicated a subject for fl straightforward three- 
paragraph reply - three pages would be more like it. 
Normally at such times we just mutter 'Not enough 
space' and move on to the letters we can answer 
briefly. 

It's a pretty interesting subject though, and It 
neatly ties in with a letter in last month's PA about 
Ghosts and Goblins. Just this once then, we're going to 
give a complicated subject the space it needs - but you 
needn't think we're going to make a habit of it. 

Vertical scrolling is very easy, and there's no real problem 
adding it to Basic games. This program illustrates scrolling the 
screen up and down. 

10 K.cuur<1-FGS<0#}:y coord *VP05(#0) "stores Cursor 

position 

2ti LUCATE 1.1 "moves cursor to too of screen 

30 PRINT GHIU(II) 'moves cursor up one line, forcing 

screen to scroll down 

'Sb WHILE INKFYJ-'VWENO 'waits For you to press a key 

40 LOCATE 1.SE5 'rr.oves cursor to bottom of &cr*en 

50 PR1N1 CHRIUG) '»ovas cursor down one line, forcing 

Scraen to scroll up 

00 LOCATE X. coord. y .cogrd ' rsstor as previous cursor 

Cos i lion 

This doesn't do anything very impressive, but you should be 
able to get the general ides from the comments on each line. 

Horizontal scrolling isn't anywhere near bo easy. If you 
want to scroll the screen sideways from Basic you'll need to use 
the OUT command, which sends a number to a peripheral chip. 
That'll be enough to put quite a lot of people off, but it isn't too 
difficult. The only problem is that it messes up the way Arnold 
writes things to the screen. This listing should give you an idea 
what I mean: 



10 MODE 2 

20 FOR a-1 TO 36 

30 CALL &BD10 'could use FRAME on 664/6128 

40 OUT &BC00.13 

50 (IU1 6BD00.S 

60 NEXT a 

70 LOCATE 1 , 1 

80 PRiNT "This should be in the top left corner" 

As you'll see if you run this, Arnold cant cope with the changes 
you've made. All printing carries on as if the screen was still 
muse i oiled. To get your screen back to normal you can either 
type MODE 2, or force a vertical scroll using the cursor keys. 

This last point is another reason why the OUT method of 
horizontal scrolling doesn't work too well- Every time you force 
a vertical scroll using the simple method we started with, you 
undo any horizontal scrolling you've done using OUT. 

Horizontal scrolling is much easier if you knew a little 
machine-code. Two firmware routines make the programming 
very easy indeed, and they let Arnold know what you're doing 
so he can print to the screen properly. 

NON-TECHNICAL 

To start with, here's a Basic program which uses the firmware 




routines. You don't need to \ 

know a thing about machine-code to \. 
use them, but there's an explanation^ 
afterwards for anyone who's interested. 

10 DATA SCn &0B ,ftBC ,8.23. &Z3.&C3.&05.&SC 

20 DATA &CD fcOB.&BC.fiiZB.&ZI.&Ca.UJii.&aC 

30 oldBen-HiNFH MPflORY (oldmem-lfi) -makes 

rour for machine code 

40 FOR a-HlMEM*! TO uldne* 'this loop 

50 READ a: HOKE a . b "pokes in 

f)0 NEXT a 'the machine code 

70 SOlflf.t"Hi«£H*1 set '•if|hT.-HIMEM*& 

80 FOR c-1 TO 100 

30 CALL SB019 *5Sfie as 664/61 28 FRAHE command 

100 CALL scloFt 'scrolls I aft 

110 NEXT c 

120 FOR c-1 10 75 

130 CALL &8D1B 

140 CALL scnghl "'ftfirol 1 S right 

150 foEXT c 

160 L0CA1 b i i 

170 PRINT "This IS in the top loft corner" 

180 MEK0RY oldmem ' rsdaias space used for machine code 

The important bits of the program are lines 10 to 70 which set up 
the scroll routines, and line 160 which dismantles them after 
you've finished with them. If you start your program with the 
commands in lines 10-70 and finish with ihe MEMORY command 
from line 180, you can use the commands CALL sclefi and CALL 
scright whenever you want to scroll the screen left or right. 

BOFFINS ONLY 

That's all you need to know to use the routines from Basic If 
you're interested though, here's how the first routine 
disassembles: 

SClaft: CALL 4BC0C SCR-GET-LOCATIOH 

:No entry conditions -- on exit, HL 
: contains the current 'screen offset'. 
INC HL , Increases HL 

JNL HL ;by two. 
.IP &BCQ5 ;SCR-SET-OFFSET 
.Value in HL is used as new 'screen 
nffset*. 

Tho second one's the same, but with DECs instead of INCa. In 
other words, one increases the 'screen offset' by two and the 
other decreases it by two. 

Clearly the screen offset is the key to horizontal scrolling - 
increase it by two to scroll left a fortieth of a screen's width, or 
decrease it by two to scroll right, It's also, incidentally, the key 
to vertical hardware scrolling from machine-code. Increase the 
offset by 30 (decimal) to scoll up one hne, or decrease it 
similarly to scroll down, This accounts lot something you'll have 
noticed with the Basic horizontal-scroll program: scrolling left 
or right by a whole screenful also scrolls the screen up or down 
one line. 

None of this tells you what the screen offset actually is, but 
wed be here all day if I tried explaining that. If you're really 
keen to know about such things get hold of Artisoft's CPU 
Firmware Guide, read it and inwardly digest it. Once you've 
done that, you'll be ready for the technical stuff that follows, 

GHOSTS AND GOBLINS 

Yea, it's that horrifying saga of colour modulators producing 



26 AMSTR AD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 i*. » *. t^ . 



SERIOUS SOFTWARE 



yovR. Loftiesr ooesr/o/v A/vscoeRea 



PROBLEM ATTIC 



V 



black-and-white pictures 

again. This isn't a change of 

subject though, since it turns out 

that a clever scrolling technique is 

the culprit, 

For those who missed last month's 
Problem Attic, the tale goes like this- Soft 
ware house Elite produced the AA Rave 
game Ghosts and Goblins a couple of months 
back, believing it to be compatible across the CPC 
range. Imagine their (and our) surprise when it turned 
out to be incompatible with Amstrad's TV modulator, 
producing only a black-and-white picture even On a colour 
TV get. 

Compatibility problems between machines happen all the 
time, but this was the first time we'd heard of modulator 
problems- The modulator simply converts me RGB (red -green- 
blue) signal meant for a colour monitor into the modulated 
signal which mo«t TV seta require through their antenna socket. 
For Ghosts and Goblins to mess up the modulator output, it had 
to be doing some very strange things with the RGB signal 

Needless to say, it was. To be precise it was moving the 
"logical' screen (ie. the picture of the ghosts, goblins etc) 
backwards and forwards across the surface of the 'physical' 
screen (i@, the hard glass bit you look at)- You can see this effect 
for yourself, with this little bit of Basic. It replaces lines 80-130 of 
(he poked -in m&chwe-COde horizontal scroll listing, so these 
must be deleted before typing in the new lines. 

30 FOR a-1 TO 50 

90 CALL &BD19 

100 OUT 4BC0Q.3:0uT i 60.00. 5 

110 CALL BPD19 

120 OUT &BC0D.3:0uT &BDQ0.&8E 

130 NEXT a 

MO flEHOHY oldiien 

This looks ugly, and would probably give you a headache if you 
atared at it for too long. If you're looking at it through a 
modulator, it should also look distinctly colourless. (1 don't have 
a modulator to test this, but I'm pretty sure of it.) Now you know 
what Ghosts and Goblins 'does, so the nest question is 'Why?' 

Piled detail from GhQSlS'fi'GobliriS 



PROBLEMS WITH SCROLLING 

A couple of issues ago I made some bold statements about 
Arnold's hardware scrolling capabilities compared to those of 
other machines. In fact, Arnold's hardware scroll does have one 
slight problem: it's too fast. 

As you may remember, the horizontal scroll routines can 
only scroll the screen a fortieth of its width at a time. That's not 
just the way the routines are written: the hardware simply can't 
manage a smaller scrolling action. 

Fast Scrolling on Vorlei's TLL 




M 



*« 







fj 



To get a smooth continuous scroll you need to make one 
scrolling movement every fiftieth of a second - the timing for 
this is handled in our scrolling programs by those CALL &SD1S 
statements. If there are fifty movements per second, and they 
each have to be at least a fortieth of the screen width, you're 
clearly going to scroll past a whole new screen of landscape in 
less than a second. 

This is too fast for anything much more than reflex game- 
play, though Vortex's TLL did quite well using these techni- 
ques. Another notable hardware scroller was Gremlin's Thing 
on a Spring, though there were slight problems at the screen 
edges on this one. 

For the most part game* programmers use either software 
scrolling or what you might call burst' scrolling. Software scroll 
only works well on very small windows (eg Rambe, Stainless 
Steefi and causes an ugly rippling effect if used on large areas - 
Sounder and the tank stage of Beach-Head are cases in point. 

The preferred technique is "burst' scrolling - keeping the 
screen fixed until the player reaches the edge of it, and then 
fast-scrolling the nest screen into position. Prime examples of 
this are Green Beret and Thrust, This is stUl far from perfect, 
and it was an attempt to improve on this that brought Ghosts and 
Goblins its problem*. 

THE 'SOLUTION 3 

The aim in Ghosts and Goblins was to provide a slow hardware 
scroll, so that the 'burst' scrolling wouldn't be so abrupt as it is 



prat^m^iutk: AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 27 



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28 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 




SERIOUS SOFTWARE 



in, for example, Green Beret. 
The method used involved both 
scrolling the screen and moving it. 

If you've typed, in the program so far. you can get a Ghosts 
and Goblins-style scroll by altering line 100 as shown below, 11 
you haven't, here it is in full: 

10 DAIA &LD.&O0 &&C,&25.t23 iC3.505.a3C 

20 DATA SCD.ftOB BRC.&2H &2B.&C3,S0S.&BC 

30 oldnein-HIwEliMEHORV (t>ld*e»-mj 

d0 FOB r.-HlMFK-l TO o!dpe» 

50 3EA0 h:P0KF a.i» 

GO NFXT a 

70 Bcl*ft-«IWE»-1 scrignt-HIKEHrfl 

80 FQ3 a-1 TO 50 

90 CAM &8D1S 

100 CALL £cle r t:0ir SBCOC 3:001 fr3DU0,5 

110 CALL SBD19 

120 OUT SBC00.3:l>Jt &RD00.&BE 

130 KFXT a 

M0 MEMORY a 1 dm mi 

The OUT commands in lines 100 and 120 move the screen left 
and right by an eightieth of its width - you'll have seen this 
already if you've been typing things in and running them as 
you've been reading, (Note that 'moving" is not the same as 
'scrolling 1 - 111 explain the difference in a minute.) The 
difference now is that 'CALL scleft 1 in line 100, 

Gi9?ti&eret os*t Burst scrolling 



PROBLEM ATTIC 



an eightieth, Alter another fiftieth of a second line 100 
scrolls/moves the screen another eightieth to the left, and so on. 
If you've still got the default colours on screen you won't be 
able to see this happening: it just looks like a slow smooth 
scroll. Sol the border and screen background to different 
colours and you'll be able to see what's happening quite clearly 
- the left and right edges of the screen blur where it's being 
moved rapidly from side to side. Here 'moving" literally means 
changing where the detailed picture part of Arnolds display 
appears on the glass tube of the monitor. 



fcBSOO.5 



NOW YOU TRY IT 

This method is a very nice way of halving the scroll speed 
without losing smoothness, and could usefully be applied to 
Basic versions of Scramble and similar scrolling games. You'd 
need to do the timing with the EVERY command rather than 
using CALL &BD19 or FRAME, and make sure ihe scroll/ move 
commands were on a higher timer priority than any other 
interrupt-d riven sequence you had running. 



Customised boot 

D Herringion (September) 
should proceed as follows! 
Type |cpr to boot a disk con- 
taining Setup.com (the system 
disk supplied or a working 
copy). Type $e lup. It replies; 
Setup 

Initial comma uri buffet 
Is th («, correct: (Y/N) 
Answer ng. 

Enter new in*tial com 
irand buffer : 
Answer star * * ftW. The aM 



means Return, but to get it into 
(he buffer you have to enter it 
this way because the Return key 
is used to terminate your entry 
(see page 5,24 in the 664 
manual). Setup asks Lots more 
questions, to which the answers 
are all yes unless you want to 
change the sign-on message. 
"Stat *.*' is fust an example, of 
course. 
A Greenwood 
St Helena 



-***«„ 






^+***t* 



"»«. 






■ 






The CALL in line 100 scrolls the screen left by a fortieth of 
its width, and the OUTs move it back to the right by an eightieth: 
net result, a scroll /move of an eightieth to the left. A fiftieth of a 
second later the OUTs in line 1 20 move the screen to the left by 



Another good idea is to blank off the blurred columns at 
each side alternately - the right-hand one at line 100 and the 
left-hand one at line 120, If you set these to the same colour as 
the border you cut (he apparent screen width down a little, but 
the loss of that unsightly ' edge-flicker 1 more than makes up for 
this. 

If you can make a decent scrolling game out of any of this, 
why not send it in to Type-Ins? Make sure you keep it short 
under 3K if possible and give it plenty of grab-factor. 
Otherwise it's up to you; knock our socks off and we'll print 
your program! 

BUT BEAR IN MIND ... 

There axe problems with (his kind of technique. For one thing. 
OUTs like the ones in lines 100-120 bypass Arnold's firm ware, 
ftv this case they work on all the machines J can find to try them 
on, but you can't run crying to Alan Sugar if you get compati- 
bility problems - Artisoft advises software houses not to use 
them. 

More seriously, it looks like Amstrad 's modulators can't 
produce a colour TV signal out of this kind of monitor input. 
One (non-Elite) programmer I met at the PCW show put it down 
to the poor quality of the Amstrad units. If this is true it's not 
exactly surprising: after all, Amstrad keeps costs down by 
cutting specifications fine. The modulator works okay for 
normal purposes, and Amstrad can hardly be blamed if it can't 
cope with Ghosts and Coblws. 

That's certainly not to say that Elite is to blame: indeed I'd 
say the company has been been unlucky. 1 don't think anyone in 
the industry expected this kind ol problem, and other houses 
are just grateful it didn't happen to them. 

Moral: Those who live on the cutting edge of technology 
will be sacrificed upon it, as Adam Osborne said. Or they get a 
bit of bad publicity, at any rate. 



wheid*jwid*w,*T™»? AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 29 






THE GAME Jjjf 




"What a p«je* '^* hlt the market 2 wpm 
new games concept to ,^j9S 

Commodore ty^^,,,^^ 



I 



%£r^ 




SPECIAL 



Arnold sends the kids to school 

AA last looked at educational software for the Arnold back in April. We'll start at the bottom this month, 
checking out a few packages for pre-school tots, and next month see what's on the syllabus for older learners. 



Trio 

Pir Julia, £9 9& ubss, £14 95 disk 



Been fishing without luck (or Amstrad 
programs to educate your offspring? Re- 
action ha* had a good number of kllcis 
from parents ad r if l in this sea. 

Piranha to the rescue! 'There's a hole 
in the marker," observed someone at this 
'small but lethal' software branch of the 
august Macmiltan publishing house. Pir- 
anha is sinking its teeth into the games 
market and also faking a first educational 
venture with Trio, a suite of three learning 
games by Raid Bsird aimed at younger 
Children. 

In &ani Goes Shopping the child has to 
go to the correct on-screen Shop and the 
correel department within it to find a cer- 
tain item - a handbrush era singing bud or 
a plump haggis or a clockwork train, 

The task is more than child s play; the 
instant the instruction screen cleared and 1 
found myself wandering in a streetful of 
shops, 1 forgot what I was supposed to be 
shopping for! 

Only the cursor keys or joystick are 



needed to play tha game, other than the 
spacebar to clear the title page. Instructions 
appear on screen lo remind you of litis If 
you don' i do anything after a time. 

Children from about age three up will 
be able to play, since they are not asked to 
type letters or words, but they will need 
someone to read the item required and the 
shop's signboards - though after a while 
(he graphics will be enough to identify the 
butcher from the baker. The youngest chil- 
dren will learn which shops are Likely to 
sell the item they want. 

The pictures of some item* within the 
shops are rather crude. I thought 1 was 
buying a 'juicy apple" according to my 
shopping list. 'Bad luck,' said the screen, 
'you have just bought a red capsicum'. 
(How many adults, let aJone children, 
would call a red pepper that? There are a 
few other obscure items, such as a Batten- 
burg cake.) 

Guide Sam to the right item and the 
screen says, "Well done, all correctl' Then 
cornea a bigger challenge: a shopping list 
with two items. They must be bought in the 
order given. 1 could never remember the 
rest of the list after finding my way to the 
first typical, says my wife. 1 never made it 
to level 3 





Computer Snap was my favourite on 
the Trio package. The colourful graphics - 
Humpty Dumpty, witch on a hioom, lightn- 
ing flashing - were charming. 

There is no reading or writing invol- 
ved in the game, and Only one key to press 



when pictures match, as in the popular card 
game. So even two-year-olds can play, 
without needing evert the dexterity to 
manipulate cards. 

One player can compete against (he 
computer or against a second player. 




Tables T&st, the Second program 
on Trio, is self-explanatory reinforcement 
stuff that a youngster could carry on using 
occasionally up to age 10 or 12, 

The child selects the 9> table, for 
example, using the cursor keys and then 
chooses speed: snail, hare, car, airplane or 
lightning (f liked the pictures). An insistent 
alarm-clock jumps up and down if the time 
runs out. 

Type the correct answer (on numeric 
keypad or main keyboard) and a happy 
disco-kid presents an apple; otherwise it's 
a skull from a scary goblin. 

One criticism is that correct answers 
are not given if a wrong answer is typed- 

All three programs axe written largely 
in Basic, which has both advantages and 
drawbacks. It should be possible to alter 
data lists to suit your household name for 
red peppers; on the other hand a child 
could press Escape and crash the program. 

All three have music throughout, like a 
miniature fairground organ, with various 
other electronic sound-effects. 



Off**,*.,. AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 31 



* 



SPECIAL 



First Steps with the 
Mr Men 

MfiFmsoIr fS.95 eass. CPC4G4 



Richard Boutton's charming story booklet 
sets tip four games with the Mr Men, Even A 
very young child can play, since no read- 
ing 1 or writing is involved. It's good pract 
ice with the ideas of left and light, which 
even many ad ul fa find troublesome. 

In the first. Mr Greedy has to be direc- 
ted lo a luscious ice-cream hiding in a 
comer of the room. Only the cursor keys 
are needed, and colour-coded stickers of 
Mi Clever pointing various ways are pro- 
vided (though I don't know how long ihey 
would las! - presumably you'd be taking 
them off lo use the computer for other jobs). 
Mr Clever's colours match the colours of 
the walls on screen (not much help on a 
monochrome monitor, but not essential.) 




Mr Greedy doe* nol stop with one ice- 
cream, but they become harder to get: 
more and more walls appear in the room 
and he has to be navigated round them. 

Tha booklet doesn't tell you to reset 
Ihe computer (Co nirol-Sh if (-Escape all log- 
ether) before you can load the following 
program without a memory full' error. 



Mr Silly is being sensible in the second 
program and has gone shopping for a hat. 
He says (piciorially) tha style and colour he 
wants to try on. Cursor keys move a mar- 
ker along the shelves and the Copy key - 
with a Mr Clever sticker - selects. What 
silly thing does he do when he tries on the 
next hat? 




/v, .'. 7/. uppMMUnj 



The third program was my favourite - I 
especially identified with Mr Forgetful who 
tidies things up into good places and then 
can't remember where. 

Mr F has installed a dozen wardrobes 
in his room: six along one wall, six facing . 
He puts a left shoe in a left-hand wardrobe 
and the right shoe in a wardrobe on the 
other Bide, How organized! He does the 
gams with socks, boots, mittens, skates and 
slippers. But oh, no, what is where? 

He must go back and forth across (he 
room (by means of the cursor keys), loo- 
king inside wardrobes- The trouble is that 
they stay open only if he finds two things to 
match. He somehow has to remember 
where he saw the first sock when he finds a 
second. 

Everything has muddled itself into new 
wardrobes if you play the game again. 

A variation on the game puts alphabet 
letters instead of clothing in the wardrobes. 
An adult can specify a subset of letters and 
make it fun for a child to learn a few at a 
time. 



In all these Mr Men games, various 
keys allow restarting the game, turning 
sound on and off (the tunes are hardly 
symphonic) or changing the background 
colour. 

A nuisance in the packaging is thai lite 
booklet does not lit inside with the cassette, 
It has to be removed from the outer plastic 
sleeve - rather awkward. Loading and 
playing instructions seem to be missing 
until you think of removing the outer jacket 
and reading the back' of it. 

The cassette is labelled CPC464' 
although the outer package says 'For use 
on Amstrad' without specifying. It would 
not toad it on our 6128; we did not have a 
tape-decked €64 to try it on, 




Here St There with the 
Mr Men 

Miiiorsnh. C7.95 tass CPC4B4, joystick oi hnys 



This time Mr Tickle and Mr Grumpy pract- 
ice left and right - thinking ahead for 
simple route planning is the theme 

The object of the first game, Mi 
Tickle's Jigsaw Puzzle, is to line up door- 



ways and move pieces to build up a com- 
plete pickup of Mr Tickle, 

|rt (he second game, Mr Tickle tries to 
cheer up Mr Grumpy, who doesn't warn to 
be cheered up. Mr T's arm can stretch 
longer and longer to reach through door- 
ways to where Mr G is hiding. Sometimes 
he trie* to block up the doorways with 
chairs. Mr Tickle's arm can be made to 
bounce off walls, chairs, Mr G or even 
itself. 



Instructions can be given a step at a 
time, using the cursor and Return keys, or 
planned out b whole list al a time- 
Mr Lazy, in the third game, is snooting 
under an apple tree. He tries to instruct a 
friendly worm to crawl along the cor red 
branches and drop a juicy apple for him lo 
eat 

A gang of four Mr Men in the last game 
tries to stop Mr Tickle from moving in a 
checkerboard-like game. ■ 





3Z AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 k*^ y^ a,»m 



SDK1 



lew fa 
turns you ane- 
mia hi v not 



r i 






TL-MA^m\f\ lA F-l * r. it* 



"'Powerplay - 

piece Ot BBC sofl ware - 

Personal Compute? World Feb 86 

The graphics in the game are 
marvellous . . The most original 
of all such (quiz) games . 
A&B Computing March "86 

' I was impressed with this game 
... the graphics are truly excellent 
the questions are interesting 

and varied it ^s highly original 

and interesting . - 

Micro User May "86 



L . 



Your copy of POWERPLAY cc 



WIN YOU A HOLIDAY IN GREECE!* 



AMSTRAD CPC4&4 5646128 

Cassette £9.95 

Disc £14,95 



S8C 
Disc Only £1 4.95 



COMMODORE 64 128 

Cassette £9-95 

Disc £14.95 



ARCANA 

SOFTWARE 

DESIGN 



Please rush me a CASSETTE/DISC* 
version of Powerplay for my 
, Amstrad/BBC/Commodore 64* 

I enclose cheque/P,0. for £ 

Name , 

Address , 



• Amsnatf & Commodore v&sua- ■ vatfaoie at an qgqq co*TmiU9* stores or aitsci 



■ 



SERIOUS SOFTWARE 



BREAKPOINT 



All CPCs, cass only 
Melbourne House £14,95 



This latest Melbourne House utility is a real oddity, and no two 
ways about il. It's a monitor - a tool for debugging machine 
code programs - and there's nothing unusual about that. The 
point is, however* that it's just a monitor: nothing more. 

If you want to program in machine code, you really need an 
assembler . This enables you to wTite your program in easy-to- 
leam assembly language rather than the completely unmemor- 
able hexadecimal numbers that make up machine code itself. 
There are many assemblers available for the Arnold, and 
they're mostly around the £15 mark in their cassette versions. 

Once you've got the hang Of programming in assembly 
language and siarted writing lengthy, complex programs. 
you'll start kj find some unpleasant bugs cropping up. Unlike 
Basic, you'll have no error messages to help you and the escape 
key is unlikely lo atop your program Worse still, bug-ridden 
machine code programs tend to go beserk, often destroying all 
evidence of what the problem actually was in the first place. 

It 1 a this kind of problem that monitors are intended to help 
you solve. They're so called because ihey let you 'monitor 1 the 
running of your program and (hopefully) stop it just as things 
start to go wrong. That way you can see what you've done 
wrong, kick yourself for your own stupidity and then put your 
program right. Sounds useful, does it? Sounds like every 
Arnold-owning machine code programmer is going to rush out 
and buy Breakpoint? Well actually, they aren't. 

If you've got an assembler you're not going to bother 
buying a monitor, tor the simple reason that you've already got 
one. As a general rule, assemblers and monitors are sold 
together as an 'assembly language programming system* or 
similar. I'll stick my neck out here and say that I can't think of 
one assembler commercially available for the Arnold that 
doesn't come with some sort of monitor. 

A monitor is considerably less useful than an assembler, 
and of very little use on its own. Clearly Breakpoint would need 
to be quite remarkable to sell under these circumstances. 
Equally clearly, I'm afraid, it isn't. 

In use it's a fairly ordinary single-step/breakpoint monitor. 
You can run your program one instruction at a time, you can run 
It slowly while keeping an eye on it, or you can set it off at full 
speed with a breakpoint to stop it at some crucial moment. 
Breakpoint can also show you areas of memory and allow you to 
make small modifications to it- You can search memory for 
particular numbers, you can save chunks of code to tape or 
disk. All functions are controlled by two-letter commands, 
entered at the command line. 

All very well, and what it does it does proficently, but that is 
what you would expect from any such package, and with most 
you would get an assembler as well. Considering that Laser 
Genius, reviewed in our July issue, offers a better monitor and 
an assembler for the same price, Breakpoint cannot be said to 
offer value for money. The sample reviewed was p re- 
production, though the manual was very reasonable, but unless 
Melbourne House add an assembler on production versions we 
cannot recommend it. ■ 



GOOD NEWS 

p» It works, and it both competent 
and thorough. 



BAD NEWS 

■* Buy laser Genius and ynu get a 
better monitor and an assembler 
thrown in for the same price, 
i* Not relocatable in memory 



reading 



WRONG 



PLUS 



THE MAC; 



AMSTRAD 

p- o w e :? 5 e - ssi?* 



If you ever use an 8000* series Amstrad - or know 
anyone who does - 8000 PLUS isthe magazineto 
remember. 

Issue 1 had a rapturous reception. 

Issue 2 is out Thursday, October 16th. it's even better. 
As well as an avalanche of exclusive tips lor PCW 
owners, there's the most detailed review yet of the 
new Amstrad PC 1 51 2 

(Make sure your newsagent reserves a copy. 



34 AMSIHAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 



WORTH FIGHTING FOR/ 




ONE UAH 

WAR MACHINE 

You are Rogue Trooper, 2000 AD ? s one-man 
war machine — the last Genetic Infantryman on 
Nu Earth, All aroundyou an eternal and bloody 
war is raging! Step into Rogue's boots and track 
d&wn ike traitor who destroyed your comrades 
and rescue them from their electronic graves. 

Spectrum ■ Commodore * Amstrad • £9.95 




*--•-' 



*Jt\ 



*m 



M m 



Strike Force 

COBRfi 

Lead the toughest commando squad of all 
time in a desperate battle to save the World. 
Fight your way through the Enemy's 
labrynthine fortress, rescue the hostages 
and destroy the vital computer complex 
on which the Enemy's power depends. 
Time is running out. The countdown to 
destruction has begun. 

Spectrum Commodore - Amstrad ■ £9.96 



%f 



Available from your local stockist or, in case of difficulty, 

from Richard Bason, Piranha, 4 Little Essex Street, London WC2R 3LF 

Tel: 01-836 6633 



I 



SERIOUS SOFTWARE 



I 




THE OCP ART STUDIO 

Rainbird (01-240 8816), CPC 612S disk only, II 9.95 

if you want to buy an art package For your Arnold, you'll 
find you're spoilt for choice. Under the circumstances any 
new system needs to be something really special if it's 
going to survive. Rainbird has just released Art Studio 
for the 6128 and special is certainly the word for it. 

Two things struck me immediately about the package: first 
thai -.- v.-orks o-ly in Arnold a two- w fioax-coloui modes [mocU-s 

1 I I** -.1 -.* mM ft 1--! _ ^* _T _ Jl 3 



second thai it is strongly inspired by the Apple Macintosh and 
similar WIMP (Window. Icon, Mouse. Pull-down monu) systems. 
How you feel about the first of these is veiy much a matter 
□J '.aste - I can't say [ miss mode myself, but it docs seem an 
odd omission As for Art Studio being WtMP-irtspired, that's 
prelty common these days. The difference here is thnt where 
most packages aim to look like She Macintosh, Art Studio sets 
qui to perform like it - and IO a considerable extent it succeeds. 

PROTECTION 

The hirst thing you'll notice about the System is <he Lenalok 
protection it uses, I've had my rant in the past about honest 
usnis beir.g saddled with cumbersome protection systems, and 
I'd certainly call Lenslok cumbersome - but in this case there is 
a reason for it 

Rambird doesn't try to stop you from making copies of Art 
Sturiia; in fact, the publisher helps you. There's a feature which 
allows you to save a "customised' version of the program to 
disk, so normal copy protection is clearly not going to work. 
Given that the program is easily usable without the manual, 
Lensiok is the only alternative to actually trusting people. 

SELECTING PULL-DOWNS 

Once you've got past the protection system to the program 

■.tself, you're presented with the usual blank screen. There's a 

series of options runs across the top of the screen, and a small 

"arrow' pointer. You can move the pointer around using cursor 

keys, joystick, or oven a mouse if you're lucky enough to have 

one. 

To seieci one of the options just move the poimer to it and 
press ' soled", (That's the space bar on the keyboard or the fire 
button on the joystick.) Selecting an option produces a pull- 
down iticnu a list of further options which overlays pan of the 
screen like a roller wuf&ojKrblind. Choosing one ol the options 
on a pull-down works the same way: move live pointer to it, 
press 'select' and there you are. 




PAINTING AND SHAPES 

The first options you're likely to be interested in axe Fainf and 
Shapes. Between them these offer you all the main features 
you'll need to create your pictures. 

The -Paini puD-down provides the lliree main tools - pen. 
brush and spraycan in a variety of different shapes and sizes. 
On selecting pen, for example, you'll gel another pull-down 
panel demonstrating the sixteen different shapes of pen avail - 



'select' and you're in pen mode. Move the pointer onto the 
drawing area and it turns from a lillle arrow to a Little pencil. 
Hold 'select 1 down, move this pencil pointer and you'll draw a 
line. 

The brush and spraycan options work in (ha same way, but 
with brush- and spraycan-shaped pointers instead of the little 
pencil shape. These different-shaped pointers are meant to 
remind you which drawing or pointing mode you're in, and like 
pull downs they make the program very easy to learn without 
the use of the manual. 

Although the available ranges of pen shapes and spray 
patterns are both fixed, you can aller the selection of brushes to 
suit your needs using the edit brush option on the Pamr pull- 
down Choosing this option gives you a brush-editing menu 
where you can a her the pattern of dots that forms each brush. 
This comes in two stages, the data and the mask. Put simply, the 
mask defines how much of the background the brush wipes out 
and the data defines how much new colour the brush applies. 

The Shapes pull-down allows you to "rubber-band' straight 
lines, triangles and rectangles. You can also draw circles and 
plot individual points. 




FILL AND UNDO 

Once you've created a drawing with Parnit and Shape you can 
flesh it out a bit with Ihe different options from the Fill pull- 
down. There are two main types of fill available: solid and over. 
Solid fill works on an area of one colour and stops at the edges 
of that area. With overfill you outline an area With (say) blue arid 
any colour inside is changed to blue, For most purposes you'll 
want to use a solid fill. 

As well as filling with Hat colour, you can solid-fill an area 
wilh one of 'A2 different textures. The predefined textures 
include grids, fine checks and wavy-lines, but if you cant find 
the one you want you can define one of your own using sdit 
texture. 

Over is the riskier proposition, bui either kind of fill can 
'escape' through the tiniest of gaps. Fortunately titers is a way 



36 AM STR AD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 DuwMtRtMn 



SERIOUS SOFTWARE 



of reversing a fill or any other kind of drawing operation Thai 
goes wrong. Of the various options across the top of (he screen 
only one works immediately rather than ottering you a pull- 
down of further choices. That option is Undo. 

The extra memory on the 6126 allows for certain luxuries, 
and Undo ia one of them. Instead of keeping just one copy of 
your picture in memory the way most art programs do the 
copy you're working on. thai is - Arr Swdic keeps a spare one 
aS well- Every time you switch drawing mode or perform some 
similar operation, Art Studio brings the Spare copy up to date. 

This means thai when you re halfway through performing a 
scries 01 fills or whatever, Art Studio still knows what your 
picture looked like before you started filling. When you select 
Undo, the program restores your working copy to the same 
state as the spare, 

This spare copy of your picture isn't used just for Undo, h 
also makes possible the v/ash texture option on the Fill pull* 
down. This remarkable feature takes all the changes you've just 
made 10 the picture - all the things that Undo would undo - and 
fills them with texture- Tins effectively allows you to paint, spray 
and draw with textures rather than solid colours. While you 
can't actually see the effect until you've selected wash texture, n 
remains a very powerful technique. 




MAGNIFY 

Another benefit of the S128's extra memory is the Magnify 
option. Rather than the small magnification window offered by 
most packages. Art Studio gives you a full-screen image. You 
can enlarge a given area of the screen by 2, 4 or 8 times. 

Sirr.ply select the appropriate enlargement factor from the 
Magnify pull-down, move the cursor (now shaped like a 
magnifying glass) to the area of your drawing which you want 
enlarged and press select'. The screen now fills with an 
enormous blown-up section of your picture. 

Though there's no normas-size image of the magnified area 
you're working on. you're unlikely to find this a problem- The 
large window means thai on >} Z magnification you can see 
almost a full quarter of your picture - easily enough to see what 
you're doing to the picture as a whole. You can switch between 
the different enlargements without returning to the main menu. 
On - 3 there's an optional grid to make it clearer where one 
pixel - one individual dot of colour ends and the next one 
begins. 

You're free to pan the Magnify window across the picture 
by pointing at and selecting the Macintosh-style 'scroll-bars' 
along the top and left edges of the window itself. You can make 
fine adjustments To the picture using any of the available 
colours, and undo them again if they don't look right. Every 
possible consideration is given to the keyboard-only user, with 
sensibly chosen keys to Switch colours and pan the window. 

TEXT 

If there's a central theme to Art Studio its thoroughness. Text 
entry, an afterthought in most packages, is given the fullest 
treatment you could ask for. You can use text m any of three 
widths and heights, combining them freely to get a wide range 




jge 

of shapes. 

lour ten car, run left to right or top to bottom, and the 
letters can be upright or sideways. There are also bold and 
italic options which can produce very useful if rather crude 
results. If you want to do anything more complex with text, the 
font editor option takes you tnto a whole new league. 

When you select font editor you're presented with a whole 
fresh screen dedicated to lettering styles. The full character set 
of the cm re n I font is displayed! Oh the bottom half of the screen, 
while at the top there's a detailed view of the character 
currently being edited. Yam can scan through the character set, 
scroll an individual character or the whole font in any direction, 
make minute alterations to the current character or clear it and 
start from scratch. 

Several fonts are supplied on the Jlrf Studio disk, and you 
can save modified versions of these or your own original fonts 
for later use. If you wanted to create foreign alphabets or 
scientific symbols for diagrams, you should find this very 
simple. OC course most people aren't going to bother with all 
this, but most packages wouldn't give you the option m the first 
place. 

WINDOWS 

Once you've created your picture you might well wanl to make 
large-scale alterations to it. The Windows pull-down offers a 
strong set of special effects based on the idea of a "window' - a 
rectangular area of the screen defined by stretching a rubber 
box' round it. 

Windows can be copied, moved or cleared. They can be 
rotated through TO, 130 or 370 degrees, mirrored horizontally 
or vertically, and stretched or squashed in either direction. You 
can use a window like a paint-brush with the 'smear' Option, or 
merge it with the previous contents of the area you're copying it 
to. There's also an option to "exclude' one colour, typically the 







in iSctkjh five 3*eood» 



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38 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 



SERIOUS SOFTWARE 



Windowing needn't involve moving an area of the screen 
around. The swap inks and change ink options allow you to alter 
the colours of a windowed area, and are particularly powerful 
for creating special effects. 

Everything possible is done to reduce the effort needed in 
defining windows. You can define the whole screen as a 
window simply by selecting iWioie screen from the pull-down, 
or redefine the previous window using Jasr window, ff you want 
to make several copies of the same thing ygu can set the 
copying mode to 'multiple'. This means that J fli?SrtJd l f0 automati- 
cally redefines the last window after each operation Qli it, 
cutting in half the amount of selection you have to do. 

FINISHING TOUCHES 

The file-handting and printer-dump options show 
the thoroughness and ease of use characteristic 
of the program as a whole. Fhe printer option 
is particularly well thought out, with just 
about every feature you could ask for lo cope 
with the quirks of different printers. 

The manual is excellent, though you 
probably won't find you need to refer to it 
all that often. For most people its chief 
function win be to point out all the 
many excellent features which you 
could otherwise easily miss. The - 

program is so natural and self-explan - 
atory that you can work cut most of 
the main features just by sitting down 
and using it. 





>^ 



' s <*^ , - 






'mfSir 









'&H£lc 



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i : 















VERDICT 

Of all the many art packages available for the Arnold, this has to 
be the best The only real shortcomings are the lack of a mode-0 
facility and the need for a 1SEE system; LensJok is an additional 
annoyance. These are far outweighed in my book by the 
enormous power, ease of use and attention to detail which are 
visible in every aspect of the system. 

While Art Studio is easy to operate from the keyboard - you 
can even define your own keys if you like - or a joystick, 
plugging in an A MX or Kemps ton Mouse turns it into an absolute 
joy. An awful lot of packages use icons and pull-downs just to be 
fashionable but Art Studio makes them earn their keep 

If you're after an art package that feels natural, gives good 
results quickly and thai you won't outgrow, An Studio must be 
the one. 



GOOD MEWS 



P-A. joy to use. 

► Extremely powerful. 

► Handle well with keys, joysti 
0' mo use - 

► Very thorough and detailed, w 
lirsl rate manual. 

]► Undo makes lor experimentation 

jwithuul tears. 

\> Can save 'customised' versions 

of system to disk. 

•>■ Terrific value - all this for £5 

less than disk version of 

Meibovntt Qtsw ____^_ 



■■■■ ■ 3 



I* No mode IT, so you can only use 
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£ ► 6S4 owners will iw*d64K of 
add-on RAM. and 484 owners will 
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P- Unstofc can lis annoy ing. 



to*! AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 39 




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40 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 



SERIOUS SOFTWARE 



A day in 
the life: 

Hour 

Arnolds 

doAff 

You might think the Ancient Capital of 
Wcssex an odd place to produce and publ- 
i£h one of Earth's leading Amslrad hi-tech 
magazines (namely the one in your hands). 

However, we do have electricity at the 
Old Bam, Arnold is quite happy wherever 
plugged in - even if some members- Of the 
staff miss the bright Lghls 

Wc compose our peerless prose on the 
green screens of three red-hot GFC key- 
boards - rather awkward since there are 
now four full-tiiue on the Amstrad Action 
editorial (earn, Bob Wade pecks away on 
his G64 while Andy Wilton stares at (he 
screen of his 6128. Jim Nagel and Matt 
Nicholson (when he's not wearing his PC 
Plus hat) fight over the other 6 128, which 
sports a second disk drive and a modem, 
This machine is usually used to sub -edit 
copy written Oh the Others. 

On the next desk sirs a permanently 
switched-on 4t>4 with the only colour moni- 
tor in the building, It has both cassette and 
disk, as well as a Maestro stereo attachment 
and one of our special-offer Konix joysticks 
(advt)- Some game or other is always runn- 
ing, whether for review or recreation, 

AA started life 14 issues ago with just 
the 464 and the 664. Can you imagine the 



If you are using your CPC to control 
your train set, run your business, play 
in a rock'n'roll band or anything else 
you might like to tell us about, the 
address is A Day in the Life, 
Arm? trad Actios, The Old Earn, 
Somerton, Somerten, Somerset, 
TA11SAM. 

That's art invitation to you to 
chronicle your experiences With 
Arnold, To start it off, we put Our own 
chips on the table this, month; Anwtrao 1 
Action is done about, by. for Mid an 
Arusirad CPCs. 



state of Bob':) eyes at deadline, after days 

and nights of word-processing on the 464s 
low-resolution colour screen? Matt can; 
he's writing this issue's Line-up on it now, 
having lost fo Jim Who's scribbling this On. 
the newer 6 128. 

Future Publishing bought three of 
these when they first came out in Septem- 
ber 1985, just after issue 1 went to press: a 
decent keyboard and disk at a price a 
young company could afford, The third one 
is cornered by Jane Farmer and Di Taver- 
ner for correspondence and invoicing - 
and for subscription files, which now push 
Taswoxd about 10 its limits. The sutaa job 
will likely go to the more-powerful PC 
when we eventually get one, 

Taaword gave way to WordStar as the 
work -horse word-processor in the editorial 




department as soon as it became available 
on 3-inch Amstiad disks. Tasword caused 
typesetting nightmares: it insisted on popp- 
ing 'hard' carnage-returns into the text file 
at (he end of every line on screen. But lines 
when lypeset do not break at the same 
point as on screen: MAW' is fatter than 'fit 1 . 

We prefer Nevnvord, but it needs twin 
disks and CP/M Plus (we still have only 
version £.2 on most of our machines), so 
only this one machine can handle it. It's a 
WordStar workalike with the advantage oi 
highlighting bold and italic on screen- Jim, 
growing a beard waiting for dither of them 
to load themselves or load a file or search- 
and replace or reformat paragraphs, is not 
allowed to yearn yet again for the lightning 
speed of Wcrdwisa Plus on that Beeb he 
hides at home. 

fn all this time we have never managed 
to configure the keyboards all the same 
way. Press Shift wiih Q on one machine and 
the cursor goes to the bottom line of the 
screen; on somebody else's you land at the 
top. 'Some day, when I'm not so busy. I will 
try to find the manual, ' 

Terrific typography 

Somerton may be in the sticks but it does 
help thai we are only six miles from one of 
the most advanced typesetters in the world; 
Wordsrniihs, a.k.a. Anvil Syslems, at Street, 
Somerset, iit the shadow of Glastonbury 
Tor. 

This firm specialises in hammering test 
files from fust about any micro's word- 
proceaaor into typeset galleys last, There 
is no day's delay while someone re-types 
everything we've already written, no fur- 
ther day spent on proofreading and correc- 
tions. A 10-minute drive up the B3151, our 
disk goes into the Joyce at Wordsmiths, bits 
z;p across a cable to the Xitan Magic Ma- 
chine, get translated into typesetter lan- 
guage, down another cable to the Laser- 
compi bromide paper develops and dries, 
a 10-minute sprint back to the Old Barn: 
within an hour of writing it's ready for the 
art team upstairs. 

We don't have to type beastly typeset- 
ter code into our copy - the simple instruc- 
tion * F3 at the top ot this article tells the 
3-/3 (em all it needs to know about font, size, 
linespacing, column width, style for head- 



ings and so on. We turn on and off 
^Sitelics'S and 'Bbeld'B with ihe same 
word-processor contmanda thai produce 
these effects on a dot-matrix printer. Com- 
plex effects like our 'good news, bad news' 
can be called up just by typing '= = good". 
Wordsmiths' service is good news. 

Confounded comms 

l mentioned a modem hanging off the sub- 
editor's 81 28 

There was a time, before my time, 
when AA tried transmitting text to Word- 
smiths down (he telephone line. The reason 
was not to save time - they can't very well 
modem the finished bromide back to us, so 
we still have to make a round trip. No, in 
the prejoyce days their machines did not 
fit our disks, so the only link was serial 
ports. 

Fine in theory, but Amstrad*s poll gave 
only 7 bits whereas the 8th is needed to 
distinguish soft' carriage-returns (which 
we don't want typeset) from 'hard' (which 
we do - to end paragraphs). 

We were stuck with a cheap (and non- 
approved) modem offering only 300 baud. 
An article could take 25 minutes to transmit. 

Worse, there was only one telephone 
line, since the first issues were produced 
from Chris Anderson's house. Thus there 
was no way of verbally confirming that text 
was being received at the other end. Many 
a wasted £5 minutes! 

Nowadays we have five phone lines 
and a good modem - a Nightingale connec- 
ted via Pace's serial interface. Cotnmstar 
software is instantly available, since it's on 
ROM. 

Its main use ss receiving copy from 
some of our free-lance writers. It's still a 
frustrating exercise trying to get one micro 
to talk to another. So it seems simpler to 
send text first to a Telecom Gold electronic 
mailbox and then retrieve it. 

Guess what? Gold stufis it hill of hard 
carriage-returns. Last week we put 
WordStar to work on a search-and-repiacc 
and went to lunch. It was still working an 
hour and a half later. 

The modem business is another case of 
'one day. when [ have time," sorting out the 
configuration once and for all, It would be 
useful to know an Amstrad technical boffin 
at Micronet headquarters. ■ 



RHduttttuit AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 41 



BOOKS 



ANATOMY OF THE CPCs 

First Publishing (02357 5244), hardback £14.95, 403pp 

Like many of First's books these days, this one hails from 
German computer-hook publishers Data Becker, Unfortunately 
it has lost a certain something on the way Jrom Diisseidorf to 
Pangbourne. At ant; point for example, il assurftfl 01 QuU "Hie 
SCREEN PACK is slaved lo the TEXT and GRAPHICS PACKS, It 
practically serves as their executive/ Later on in the same 
section it refers to the action of control code 07 as Khnge]" 
rather than the 'Bell" yon might have expected. Minor niggles 
perhaps, but clarity's important in technical books. There's no 
sense putting extra obstacles in the way of understanding, when 
most authors can create plenty of their own. 

CONTENT 

The book breaks down into three main sections: hardware, 
operating system and Basic. The hardware section is not 
particularly noteworthy, taking for the most part a chip-by-chip 
analysis of the CPC's innards. While this can be quite interest- 
ing, it contains very little that Amstrad's firmware guide doesn't 
handle better. A fair amount of effort is wasted describing 
features that Arnold's design prevents the user from getting at. 
Do you really need a book about what Arnold might have been? 
To make things worse, there are qu;ta a few omissions and 
inaccuracies- The authors claim that they could only find 
information on half of the possible RAM configurations on the 




6128, even though the missing configurations are at least 
partially documented and can in any case be worked out with a 
little effort. Why they didn't make that effort I'm not sure, but 
galling to pay £13 for a book and then have to work it out 
yourself. 

They also misunderstand the conditions under which key- 
clashes occur, and state boldly that such clashes have no 
adverse effects. In fact key-clashes can cause serious problems 
in games and make twin joysticks almost useless. It is important 
that programs requiring key combinations are written with this 
in mind, and the key combinations chosen accordingly, 

INTO THE ROMS 

The sections on the operating system and Basic are where the 
book starts to earn its price. These axe built round near- 
disassemblies of the lower and upper ROMs respectively. I say 
l near -disassemblies' because there are no details of the actual 
source code itself. Rather there are extensive notes on the 
precise function and structure of ROM routines. 

The idea is that you print out your own disassembly of each 

42 NOVEMBER 1986 AMSTRAD ACTION oo^-d. 




ROM, and then use the book as a set of notes explaining each 
section. If you don't have a disassembler, fear not: there's one in 
the appendix for you to type in. If you don't have a printer, on 
the other hand, you're probably wondering why the book 
doesn't contain a source-code listing as well as the admittedly 
comprehensive notes. 

I'm not entirely convinced that lack of space is the reason: 
most of the time the notes occupy only the left side of each page, 
and frequently the hex or source code would explain itself 
perfectly well anyhow, I don't know whether legal worries 
intervened, but the ROMs are copyright and this may have 
something to do with it. Or maybe Schneider owners all have 
printers. 

One thing even printer owners should ask themselves 
about is the actual usefulness of these listings. For starters, they 
only cover the 6128 ROMs. While the authors are at pains lo 
point out the similarities between the different CPCs, this is 




bound to cut down the book's appeal to 664 and more 
particularly 464 owners. 

More importantly, rummaging around in Arnold's ROMs 
has little or no practical value. Routines in the lower ROM can 
and should be called via the Ermware jumpblock, as the authors 
themselves state at one point. Calling ROM routines directly 
makes for compatibility problems, and prevents interception of 
operating system calls. 

VERDICT 

Don't get me wrong - the Basic ROM in particular is a pretty 
interesting thing to take a wander around, but I don't really 
think the book's curiosity value quite merits the £14.95 asking 
price, You're going to need the Firmware Guide if you want to 
use the operating-system routines, and the extra information in 
this book really isn't worth the money. 



BOOKS 




GOOD NEWS 

► Interesting rn8leit.il on upper 
and lower ROMs 



AMSTRAD ADVANCED USERS GUIDE 

by Daniel Martin 

Glentop Publisher* (01-440 4130), paperback £8.50, 160pp 

Once again we have a technical volume which hail* from 
abroad - France in this case - but there's a marked difference of 
emphasis on this one. I can't find fault with the tianaialion quality 



y\ 



% m§ 







here, but then the book is largely a collection of tables and 
diagrams anyway. There's very little straight text to it, and no 
form at commentary to take you from one piece of data to the 
next. 

The first problem with the book is its scope: it's a jack of all 
trades and master of none. After two pages on the CPC's 
internal architecture, the author launches into a chapter on 
Basic. If you own a 484 you'll have most of this - a keyword 
Summary, character-set breakdown , Ascii table etc - in your 
manual, 

E you're a 664 or 6128 owner, on the other hand, you could 
reasonably wonder where FILL, COPYCHRS and similar Basic 
1,1 keywords have got to. The chapteT and indeed the whole 
book are, it turns out, 464-specific with extra 664/6128 inform- 
ation relegated to the appendices. It's a bit of a shame then that 
the author fails to point this out either in the keywords section, 



any other place where the CPGs differ or indeed anywhere at 
all. It's even more of a shame that Glentop didn't collate the 
book in the obvious way, 

It doesn't really matter, because there's no startling new 
keyword information here. Where the CPC manuals are despe- 
rately short on explanations, so is this book- You want to know 
how CALL parameters are passed to machine-code subrout- 
ines? That's just too bad, because the book doesn't tell you. 

Moving on to the book's meatier chapters we get a 
whirlwind tour of Z8G code and the operating system. The 
section on machine code is a brief set of notes and a whole load 
of tables The flags table is quite handy and the disassembly 
charts are very well presented, but serious programmers will 
want timing details and these are sadly missing. Overall it could 
be handy for reference if you're well up on Z30, but it certainly 
won't teach you anything if you aren't. 

The operating-system details are probably what most 
people will buy the book for, and they are detailed enough to 
be usable - but only just. Entry and exit conditions are given 
along with some indication of each routine's function. This will 
be more than sufficient for TXT OUTPUT, but mosl people will 
need a lot more before they can use something like KL [NIT 
EVENT. Once again, if you know it already the book could be a 
useful reference work. Otherwise you can forget it. 

The rest of the book is in much the same vein, consisting in 
roughly equal parts of stuff that you already had in your manual 
and stuff that you didn't want to know in the first place. If you 




want all the tables and charts from your user manual together 
with a handy (but rather lightweight) precis of the Firmware 
Guide then this book could be for you, but don't expect it to 
replace either of them. Personally I would only use it for quick 
reference, and it's oiuy just thorough enough for that. 




nuiwoMd*, AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 43 



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44 NOVEMBER 1966 AMSTRAD ACTION 



Featuring the world's greatest game reviews 

MASTERGAME 
Revolution (Vortex) ,.. .. — 50 

AA RAVES 

Deactivators (Ariolasoft).... ........ ....... A& 

Split Personalities (Domark) ... ,.,,,.46 

Tempest (Efectric Dreams) 4B 

OTHER GAMES TESTED 

Nexor (Design Design) 46 

Pro-Tennis (Loriciete) ,.- .53 

Space Shuttle {Aclivision) ....55 

Olympiad *S6 (Atlantis) 56 

5-a-side Soccer (Mastertronic) 56 

Knight Rider (Ocean)... 57 

The Apprentice (Mastertrontc) 58 

The Vera Cruz Affair (Infogrammes) 59 

Con-Quest (Mastertronic) 60 

Golden Path (Amsoft).. ........61 

PREVIEWS 

Prodigy (Electric Dreams) ...62 

Trail blazer (Gremlin) .. 62 




Third Opinions: 

To prevent needless repetition, and to give the old Ed 
a rest once in a while, we have only put Third Opinions 
on the AA-Raves and Mastergame. Whether a game 
gets these titles or not is generally a group decision, 
though usually Bob's vote prevails I 



VORTEX ON TOP 

Distributed by US Gold, Vortex's Revolution earns the 
coveted Amstrad Action Mastergame award this month 

with simple but gripping action. The graphics are 
superb, and controlling that bouncing ball takes some 

doing even for the hardened Joystick waggler. 

But AA-Raves are t hin on the ground , with only three 

on otter this time round. Deactivators from ArioEasoft 

sees robots running around disposing bombs and 

trying to keep things together before the building 

blows, while Domark's Split Personalities is a clever 

variat ion of the old Puzzler gam e w it h & top ical sla nt . 

Tempest from Electric Dreams is a fast moving version 

of the arcade classic. 

The TV'based Knight Rider gets a firm thumbs down - 

slick to the TV version if you want some action - and 

TheVera Cruz Affairwas disappointing. But what are 

you doing reading this? Turn the page and get into the 

real stuff! 



TOP 20 AMSTRAD GAMES 

The chart created by AA readers 



TTlB 

rnonih 


rnonfr 


% of votes 


Tito 


Software house 


1. 


1 


10,2% 


GET DEXTER 


PSS 


2. 


2 


8.4% 


GREEN BERET 


Imagine 


3, 


3 


S. 2% 


BOMBJACK 


Elite 


4. 


7 


8.0% 


BOUNDER 


Gremlin 


5 


4 


6.4% 


BATMAN 


Ocean 


6. 


12 


6.3% 


COMMANDO 


Elite 


7. 


5 


5.9% 


SPINDIZZY 


Electric Dreams 


8. 


11 


5.9% 


SORCERY PLUS 


VirgirVAmsoft 


9. 


— 


5.2% 


KUNG FU MASTER 


U S Gold 


10. 


19 


5.0% 


SPELLBOUND 


Mastertronic 


11. 


— 


4.9% 


THRUST 


Firebird 


12. 


— 


4.6% 


THING ON A SPRING 


Gremlin 


13. 


14 


4.0% 


KANE 


Mastertronic 


14. 


10 


3.4% 


GHOSTS'N' GOBLINS 


Elite 


15. 


— 


3.4% 


KNtGHTTYME 


Mastertronic 


16. 


15 


2.8% 


HARVEY HEADBANGER 


Firebird 


17. 


— 


3.0% 


3DSTARSTRIKEII 


Realtime 


18. 


9 


2.8% 


HIGHWAY ENCOUNTER 


Vortex 


19 


— 


2.3% 


BATTLE OF BRITAIN 


PSS 


20. 


— 


2.1% 


WHO DARES WINS II 


Alligata 



No change to the top 
three positions once 
again, although Bounder 
has bounded over 
Batman to take the fourth 
place. 

Fresh to the charts 
come the excellent 
cheapie Thrust, which 
should work its way up 
the charts tairly soon, 
Thing on a Spring, the 
brilliant Knight Tyme, 3D 
Starstrike If, Battle of 
Britain and Who Dares 
Wins It. 

If you think that Get 
Dexter is rubbish, or that 
Space Invaders is the 
best thing since Pong, 
then remember * these 
Charts are yours. Use the 
form on page 96 and you 
could change the world. 



ACTION TEST 



DEACTIVATORS 

Ftankror Auclasofi. £5.95 wss. £14 35 disk, joystick or keys 



This first game on fitiolasoft's new arcade- 
action label looks like being their best so 
far on the Arnslrad, 

It's set in a building where terrorists 
have planted borate an five different Boors 
of increasing ske and complexity. You 
have to get rid of then-; before they ex- 
plode. To d,0 that you use a team of andr 
eida within the building who (which?) not 
only hav., to cope wiih the bombs but a host 
of other pr Dbiems as well . 

The screen 13 split info two sections, 
the lop part showing two rooms in the game 
and the bottom part presenting various 

as of information. Each room is shown 
in 3D perspective from one side- and Will be 
connected to others by doorways, nans- 
porter pads or fireman-style poles. The 
section below usually shows a map of (be 
building with your droids and Ihe bombs 
marked. 

An icon menu can be activated by the 
fire button ro replace the map, providing 
four possible actions; change droid, throw 
object, loot around, and return to current 
droid. 

Tme five Doors are of increasing siae, 
coniplexjty and number of boubs so the 
fits! floor may seem easy, but ihe fifth is a 
real monster. 

On each floor is a computer which has 
several circuit-hoard? missing. They have 
to be found by the droids and inserted into 
the- computer, inserting a board will causa 



one of several things to happen, making 
getting rid of the bombs possible or easier, 
ft may reveal a doorway, pui on the lights in 
a pitch-black room, remove a foicefteld 
blocking a route, enable a "iansporter Or 
do nothing at all. 

Each Hoor has a single esit. Once a 
route to it has been cleared you've got to 



SECOND OPINION 
This one's got a marvellous 
combination of brain-taxing strategy 
and tough, nerve-racking action. The 
differing- gravities, the dud circuit* 
boards and ihe enemy droids all pose 
challenging problems. But your real 
opponent is the clock- It's gripping, 
frustrating and very, very mean. 

JtW 



atari getting the bombs out before their 
time-Puses inn out and they explode. To 
move eoth bombs and circuit-boards 

ve got to pass them between droids, 
throwing them through holes in the walls 
which the droids can't pass through, This 
can be hazardous though because too many 
impacts by the bombs and ... kabcom. If 
one- bomb explodes you can't pass on to the 
next floor, but you can restart on the floor 
you've reached. 

The use of perspective in the rooms is 



important; a three-dimensional environ- 
ment haa been created very well The 
droids and other objects get larger as (hey 
come into lite foreground. Positioning is 
important when catching objects. They 
move around (heir environment by falling 
through holes in the chequered floor . using 
transporter pads that connect remote sec- 
tions of the building, and by sliding down ._ 
poles (also, unlike firemen, up poles). 

The bombs fuses are Ml at intervals so 
you must throw them out in the right order, 
which can only be learnt by trial and error. y 
If one explodes, the room can't be entered 
and anything inside it is annihilated. 

Droids. can also be lost 1/ they ran inlet 
robot guards who try to follow them, or 
fcrcefiekts placed on some doorways. 
poles and transporters. Bonus droids are 
given for getting enough points; these can 
be positioned during a game, a hit like 
bringing an a substitute. 

The most interesting feature of (he 
game is thai rooms are sometimes turned 
through 90 or iSQ degrees to be on their 
sides or upside-down, This creates some 
knotty control problems 'hat can cause a 
vita] spin-second's confusion Rooms also 
have different levels a| gra-.Tr>' important 



' 



NEXOR 

Design Design £8.95 cass EM 9& disk joystick or keys 



Design Design is usually reknownod lor its 
wacky and original games, but I suspect 
many fans will be disappointed by this one. 
It's an isometric 3D game, not a criftH 5 - in 
itself, but one that borrows most of its 
features from Batman and doesn't provide 
as interesting a game. 

The game is set in a military complex 
which has been overrun by alien robots. 
You have 10 escape wiih a top-secret mas- 
ter weapon and its blueprints. 

The weapon is split into five pteees and 
there arc rwo of each piece. You have to 
get together al least one complete device 
and try to stop the aliens getting the pieces 
of the other one. To escape ihe complex, 
which has beer set to self-destruct, yoti also 
need a control panel for the matter -transfer 
beam and the blueprints of the weapon. 

The rooms in the complex, are connec- 
ted by doorways, vertical sh&ils and lifts. 
Some open out so that you need to try 
walking off the front edges of them to see d 
there's a connecting room. They re not as 
well drawn or as colourful as Batman; the 
colour scheme is the same sort as 2112 AD- 
Although many of tho objects at first look 
unfamiliar . their uses and effect are quickly 



Collecting ihe pieces of the weapon is just 
like getting the bits of the Batinobile: they 
even come together on a separate screen in 
(he B&xtie way. 

The robot guardians appear in most 
rooms but this seems to depend f>n a time 
factor or your having visited certain loc- 
ations. Some fellow strict movement pai- 
lerns while others are more random There 
are also static hazards, but all are deadly to 



SECOND OPINION 
If you 're going to rip off features of 9 
gam e then you mtgh t at feast choose 
the best ones. Where are all the 
devious pozzies, the strange powers 
and the floating in the air? The Batman 
theme definitely bears repeating but 
you need mare variety than this — 
which is basically jus! a matter of 
wandering around mapping. 

AW 



the touch- Nothing is new to what's gone 
befotif* in Batman and the Ultimate games, 
Some of the hazards are Weil drawn includ 
iiig moving- head busts of Maggie 3 million' 



You'd think you couldn't go wrong by 
producing a game similar to Batmatt, Bui 
the bila that have been left out are whal 
gave the or-gina! its greatness. There 
aren't enough complica led puzzles, you 
can't float or collect skills, and the graphics 
aren't nearly as detailed or colourful. It's 
not a bad arcade adventure with quite a lot 
to explore and find and many obstacles to 
overcome, but it does suffer from lack of 
originality by arriving in Batman's wake. 

BW 

FIRST-DAT TARGET SCORE 

3 pieces of weapon 



One of ihe 
3D rooms 



recognisable. Thatcher, nasty apikos. bombs and a little 

You can walk, jump and Tall (miles at a fellow ana unicycle. 
nme) around the complex, but your jump- 
ing action is slow and doesn't get you very 
far. You can pick up objects while standing 
on them and use them :o g^r through 
doorways, to teach oiher inaccHSijibJo 
points or to avoid robots As in ifctr/mn you 
can't take these objects out of a room. 


| 


1 


| 


" 


I 



4€ AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 Milrtl 



ACTION TEST 




*hfcn trying to threw things. 

The graphics ire the mcst disappoint- 
ing part of the came because there's no 



attempt to use (he AmstTEC^fi excellent 
colour raeilities. Bui she 3D is good, and the 
frenetic gamepiay is excellent. You're 
constantly battling a tight ems-hinit and 



•rig delicate manoeuvres where 
one slip and the game is hlswsi. 

BW 
FIRST-DST TARGET SC0KE 
20,000 



GSIEEN SOUGEN VIEW 
No probi&ms with pfoyingin green 



► Tiv» lcveU of tncT*»«ing difficulty. 

► & tough test at time «nd reactions. 

► Wcll-dpsigned building* to moke 
thing? complicated, 

► Camoplay leqinros great 
conccntxation And quick thinking. 

► Excellent featureB Uke twisted iooiwu, 
gravity changes and blaekiid-oat room*. 




aoT^fwitut^ AM3TRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1 986 42 



ACTION TEST 




TEMPEST 

Elntfik fhoams, f 5.S9 cass, f 14.99 i(isk, joystick or kftys 



tf you road our preview a few months back 
you'll know that this classic shoot-em-up is 
my personal favourite from the a* cades. 
This certainly can't be described as a faith- 
ful conversion but it retains most of Ihe 
elements of the original and the same mind- 
loss but incredibly addictive gameplay. 

It's a completely abstract concept that 
rakes you into (he world of the- wireways to 
face a deadly assortment of alien forces. 
These aren't the same as the arcade ver- 
sion and some have been renamed but 
there are also some nasty additions to keep 
you on your toes, The purist won't be 
entirely happy with the changes but (here's 
still a fabulous game here. 

The wireways are made up of SO differ- 
ent types of grid and chare are 99 skill 
levels, but once yc-u'ie past level 10 things 
get very tough. Each grid has a number of 
lanes that taper away so wards the centre of 
the screen, although the number of lanes, 
and therefore the ease with which they can 
be covered, varies with each grid. The 
grids either wrap around or have closed 
ends which yon can't movo oft 

At the top of the grid is the spark which 
you control and this can move sideways 
across the lanes and fixe a hail of bullets 
down them. The aliens come onto ihe grid 
from the bottom and try to advance to the 
top of it where they can run into Ihe spark 
and destroy it. The types of alien depends 
on the skill level but on higher levels 



everything gets thrown ac you, 

The moat basic of the enemies are the 

flippers which flip across lanes as they 
advance up the grid. These can appear on 
their own or by shooting spuming squares 
called tankers which will produce two of 
them, Fuseballa are spiky objects which 
move straight up a lane and have to be 
dealt with quickly. Pulsars htq straight tines 
that behave exactly the same as [useballs 
but are harder to see coming. 



SECOND OPINION 
This is the most mindless tliing I've 
ever seen, and I love it, The game just 
thiows so much had stuff at you so fast 
th a t despera tely fz&mied Muslin g is 
the only a nswsi. Good movem en f at> d 
tiring technique can help up to a point, 
but yew 'ft get a lot further just 
hammering the keyboard like crazy, 
Bin your joystick and get sapping! 

AW 



A completely new typo of alien is the 
spinning fuseball, which is also released 
from destroyed tankers and spins around 
the grid very fast, spiralling upwards as il 
goes. The last feature is spikes that movo 
up the grid Leavinq a trail behind, which 
remains if the head is shot. At tho end of ihe 
level the spikes grow upwards and you 
have to get the spark gut of (he way and to a 



clenr Utne before diey reach the top, 

You can get an admirably heavy rate of 
Eire but you'll need it to deal with the 
hordes of enemies, and at nmes you'll have 
to be vsry accurate as well. 

As a last resort you've got a super - 
sapper that wipes out the whole grid,, but 
you've only got one of those per grid. You 
need to save this for as long as possible 
because it's (he only way to gel rid of aliens 
that reach the top of the grid. That's a 
design flaw which isn't present on the 
original but doesn't harm the action too 
much. 

The vector graphics are quite nicely 
done although you do got screen slowdown 
when there's a lot going on. The colour and 
sound arc reasonable, but to get the best 



THIRD OPINION 

A superb version of an arcade classic, 
No demands on theginy nuUtar, groat 
for the jaJre/Ttflut. 

MN 



SPLIT PERSONALITIES 

Dtmidrk. f 8 9G cass. CI 4.95 Aisk r joystick or fcays 



Doinark don't have the mosl sparkling of 
regulations on the Amstrad with some not 
able past turkeys" to their debit. But 
they've certainly broken the pattern with 
this latest release. It's based on letter- 
square or tile-sliding puzzles but takes 
them into a whole new dimension with 
some very different and entertaining ideas. 

The basic idea is to construct a famouE 
E&ca from 20 puzsle pieces - within a lime 
Umit and while trying to deal with a number 
of additional hazards. 

ft all takes place on a single screen, 
most of which is occupied by the 35-equare 
playing area. In the top-left square is a box 
from which the various puzzle pieces 
emerge. You control a cursor that moves 
freely around the grid. When it goes into 
the box you can Tit*' a square out onto the 
screen. 




SECOND OPINION 

If you always thought Seagan and 
Thatcher needed their heads 
rearranging, here s your chance. If 
you want to tost your ski ft and reaction 
speed against a tough time limit you 
can do that too, but be warned: it's 
very addictive and incredibly 
frustrating. 

AW 



Once a square is in play you can put 
the cursor over it and slide it in any 

direction until it hits the wall or another 



square. When the cursor :s placed over a 
part of the puszie the relevant square lights 
gp on a smaller version of the pictuie ir. the 
top-right corner of the screen. Thts shows 
you where each piece has to end up. 

Up to now it just sounds like a simple 
tile-sliding puzzle, but then* are many 
complications . On three sides of the grid 
there are sliding doors: squares can be 
pushed through thorn when open so that 
they have to be retrieved from the box. 
There are also cracks that may appear in 
the walls: if you throw a square into one it 
bounces back, 

Apart from Ihe picture squares there 
are also a number of other items thai may 
be thrown out of the box, some good for 
you and others a real problem. A good old- 
fashioned bomb, for instance, fuse sizzling. 
If one oE these is thrown out you have 
five seconds to chuck il out door or to throw 
it into a water-tap, Ihe latter action getting 
you healthy bonus points. If a bullet, do 
those points by throwing it into a gun. II 
diamonds, fling two together and extend 
your rime limit. 

Characters also have objects specific lo 
themselves that when thrown together give 
bonus points. These you learn liy OX] 
mentation but it's usually obvious whai will 
work with what. There are also dangerous 
:tams like matches and fuel which don't go 
very well together. 

You need to go for all ihe bonuses you 
can because time is very short (you'll often 
need those diamonds) and an extra life la 
given only at 100,000 points. 



The pictures are quite well drawn and 
you should have no trouble recognising all 
tho characters, They range from politicians, 
computer-industry figures and film stars to 
the royal family and pop stars - a very 
mixed bunch, 

Lsfaz levels gst really tough: doors and 
cracks bocOmc more awkward and Squares 
bounce off each other if they don't have a 
wall or another block behind them when 
they collide 

FIRST-DAY TAHGET SCORE 

2&,Q0D 




cem fhfj 



be* 




ACTION TEST 




GREEN SCREEN VIEW 
The grid c»ff in? very difficult to see on 
one or two levels, and that means yoa 
can get into real problems with 
pulsars. It's still playable, but do you 
really need this much frustration? 

AW 



k 



I 



W 



► Good vector graphics and lota of 
them. 

► Fast and mindless blasting at all 
times. 

► A variety of nasty aliens to deal with. 

Different grids requiring different 
approaches. 

► Becomti ft really tough challengs;. 



ti 



W 



from il you need to pUy m a dark soom w;!b 
a couple of stereo speakers turned up loud. 
Js's brash, it's mindless, fast and fiincua 
- you'll love it. 

BW 



FIRST-DAY TARGET SCORE 

30,000 




Not a faithful conversion so fans of the 
original may minis some things. 
P Liable to cause aatrome wrist cramp. 



GRAPHICS 



SONIC S 



GRAB FACTOR 



STAYING PCWER 



A A RATING 






plenty of levels 10 keep you going and 
you'll find it tough not to come back for 
more every lime. 

BW 



GREEN SCREEN VIEW 
There are real visibility problems on 
some puzzle pieces, but the key at the 
top olilic screen means that it's alii] 
playahlc- 

AW 






Recognisable pictures of the famous. 

Very tasting and addictive gameplay. 

Lots of surprise features like bombs 
and diamonds. 

Increasing difficulty with new 
feature* being added. 

Needs concentration and quick 
thinking under pressure. 



Bombs can pop up in an impossible 
situation. 



GRAPHICS 



SON l« 



GRAB FACTOR 



STAVING POWER 





REVOLUTION 

Vortex/US Gold, £9.95 cass. £14.95 disk 



No : it's rtot a film-licensing deal of that 
mega-flop stalling Al Pacino, but a highly 
original arcade game thai will provide 
many more hours of enjoyment than any 
silver-screen epic. It's in a grand tradition 
of Vortex games renowned for their origin- 
ality, graphics and gameplay. 

The game concept and task are ex- 
tremely simple. You control a bouncing 
ball; its sole mission is to nil lit tie red cubes, 

It has to bounce through eight levels of 
ptey. In isometric 3D you. see each level 
rather like a floor of thick floating tiles - a 
grid of blue blocks suspended in black 
space, Don' I bounce down the cracks! 

Somewhere on each grid are four 
puzzles. You solve them simply by touching 
one red cube with the ball and then, within 
a time limit, touching the second. 



SECOND OPINION 

Those terribly clever Vortex people 
ha vb done it again This one's oven 
simpler than Highway Encounter, t-ven 
more fiendishly addictive and a whole 
lot more colourful. The game task is 
huge, but yoa '11 joe hooked so 
completely yoa '11 hardly notice, 
Pushes your brains and your skills as 
far as they'll go, 

AW 



To start with you'll need to get the hang 
of controlling the ball crucial to solving 
the puzzles. Pushing in any direction 
bounces the ball that way, But be careful 
about hitting diagonals on a joystick, and 
remember that the ball won't change direc- 
tion, suddenly or in mid-flight. 

Controlling the ball's height of bounce 
is the most important thing, and this is very 
cleverly done. You control the energy put 
into the bounce: you can set it at five 
different levels using the fire button. In- 
crease or decrease it* energy (it shows on 
a little meter be (torn-left) and the ball 
gradually bounces higher or lower corre- 
spondingly, Put in no energy and the bail 
will eventually just roll around the floor: 
with maximum power it can leap. 

You have to be patient and accurate at 
times in order to get just the right bounce. 
Once you've got the hang of the bouncing 
it's great fun to use and watch. 

The ball can fall down the gaps be- 
tween the tiles and be lost forever; the 
same fate awaits if you bounce off the grid 
entirely. 

There are other dangers lurking amid 
the puzzles. A nasty breed of spiky ball 
disintegrates yours if you touch it. Unidenti- 
fied spinning objects (USQsT) fly randomly 
about the grid; if they bump you in mid- 
jump (hey can throw you off into thin air. 

Most of the puzzles look straightfor- 
ward, but you goon find that controlling the 
ball accurately and avoiding dangers isn't 
easy when you're trying to do it quickly - 



particularly because most puzzles have 
complications. These are two types of 
square on the floor, behaving like trampo- 
line or glue: one immediately sets your 



THIRD OPINION 
It takes some time to- get used to 
controlling the bouncing ball - hitting 
the diagonal is particularly difficult 
and needs a goad joystick: - but the 
puzzles are fiendish and the graphics 
something else. Revolution has been 
compered foSpindizzy, bat it is a 
completely different game really and a 
v'talpart of your collection! 

MM 



big trouble. These squares arm vital for 
solving some puzzles but you. really have to 
take care around them. 

The four puzzles on each level all have 
to be completed within an overall time 
limit, before you return to your starting 
point and go to the nest level. You land on 
levels in a random order so you get to see 
all of them even without completing the 
game. This doesn't make the game any 
easier - as. you move to the next IeveI T the 
time between touching a puzzle's two red 
cubes is reduced. To succeed, you have to 
find the most efficient 
route of getting be- 
tween them. 



j limping energy and height to maximum, 
and the other to zero. Furthermore they 
have a repelling effect: they elide or launch 
you off in a direction that might put you in 



50 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 tc. Lazry, r™ back 




ACTION TEST 



TiH coi dof l«l 



On* of tiw I *o 
cube* you have >o 
hi) 



t^i (hTj, if'i 



Tb« i*fl jvmjj 



ime 



ftMtgtvnyouc 

*udd*<i lioosl 



Th.i kilt a ji/mp 



FQIST-D&r TARGET SCORE 
20,000 



Despite its simple concept and 
graphics, (he game plays superbly and 
looks good. To star: with you can complete 
some puzzles just by quick reactions and a 
bit of luck, but as you progress you have to 
work out the beit routes and get more 
proficient At control and accuracy. The 
bouncing action of the ball is superb and 
the degree of difficulty just right to get you 
hooked - aa well as to provide a long- 
lasting challenge . 

BW 



Wonderfully original concept. 

Excellent bouncing action in 3D. 

Puiilaa need thought and goad 
control. 

Simple but effective graphics. 

Increasing difficulty puts stress on 
skill - 

Good Yuiety of puzzles. 



Diagonal controls can be lough. 



GREEN SCREEN VIEW 
Less interesting to look arm&ybe, but 
every hit as ptayabfe. The loading 
screen 's the only thing thai really 
suffers. 

AW 



GRAPHICS 


72% 
46% 

90% 


wmrnm 


SDNICS 


GRAB FACTOR 


:^: : :-:*;fcS£8&8fflffl 


STAYING POWtR 




::v:v:-:-3&888888888 


A A HATING 


■■■"r-<4wy5B5SS9DBSK 



s M i-r.^.b V Ms M ig««AMSTKAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1886 51 



1 



▲ 






mm&f& 



spa/in 



*9** 



« - ' ' 



■■st 



£^^-Z&2f* 




rp- ■'"*■■ 4 




^H S3 




1 , xf^M 



sn 



<u 



**** 




"&] 



SPECTRUM 

£7.95 



EA. 



COMMODORE 64 

£8.95 

AMSTRAD 





7h§ coin-op kings from Konaml each game an all action arcade hit now 
available for your home computer Treat your computer to only the best game 
=f=^7=Wf - crown it with the arcade kings! 



Jrmagine Software f 1984; Umited • 6 Central Street- Manchester M2SNS Tel. 061 8343939 ■ Teiex: 669977 






ACTION 



PRO-TENNIS 

Liiiii.ii>!!, Auivisicin. f S 99 cass. £14 19 (Hsit. joystick Uf keys 



The only other tennis simulation of any note 
is Match Point, That was pretty good - it* 
main problem wee that it was just too tough. 
Pro-tennis can put up an equally good 
battle but is a bil more player -friendly, 
giving some helpful options. 

The court is viewed from above one 
end, flanked by crowds who always gel 
excited at the end of a game. You can play 
against the computer or another player 01 
watch an exhausting demo game. On either 
of its two skill levels the- computer is very 
difficult to beat since it doesn't make many 
unforced errors - you, however, actually 
have to hit winners. 

You can play the game in two modes, 
which make the action easy to get into. The 
automatic mode jual gives you the job of 
positioning the player to hit the ball so thai 
you don't have to worry about the timing of 
hitting the ball - that's done for you. The 
manual mode gives you (hat extra job of 
liming the stroke and makes the computer 
that much harder to beat. 



SECOND OPINION 

The automatic mode really does make 
tins a simple piece of fun. It captures a 
lot of the atmosphere of tennis while 
staying very playable. I'm not really a 
tan of Sports simulations, but this 
rfh n look 

AW 



■ 



You can choose lioin thrco types ot 
playing surface' day. grass and hard court. 
The surface won't initially moke much dif 
ference to you but affects the bounce of the 
ball and speed of the players Matches can 

be played ovei one, three or Eve seta; 
these can last a very long while because 
very lengthy rallies are the rule. 

The service occurs automatically but 
can be directed toward one side of the 
service court. Once the ball i* in play the 
computer is quite happy to sit back and 
play from the baseline. This means that to 
win you need to gel to the net and either hit 
outright winners (passing shots, and lobs if 
he cornea in.) or force him into lobbing the 
ball over the baseline. The danger is that 
he will hit a lob in and you won't be able to 
get back to it in time. 




Although the rallies can be 
against the computer, they can also be 
quite exciting if you're on the net because 
of the continual effort needed to get the bail 
back and to try to hit winners as well. The 
two-player action is of course even more 
exciting with much more unpredictable 
play. 

The graphics aren't particularly impre 
save: the players are small and the strokes 
indistinci. But the action is compulsive. The 
automatic option and the different courts 
bring a bit of variety Most importantly, 
you'll get a good contest out of it 

BW 



FIRST-DAY TARGET SCORE 

Take a set off the computer 

GOOD 



Tough computer opponent. 
P- Helpful automatic option. 
> Ball speed varies a lot from fast drives 
to slow lobs. 

-- more friendly and playable than 
Match Point 




B 



N 



F 



W 



s 



Rail lea with the computer can be very 
long. 

»■ If you've already got March Point it 
doesn't offer much more. 



AH thtt courts look like grass, b 
othe i -te's no problem , 



GRAPHICS 


51% 
37% 
7S% 
T5% 
76% 


M - 1 i Pill 

>:■:■»» 


SQNICS 


GRAB FACTOR 


STAVING POWER 


A A RATING 



WW..—T? AMSTRAD ACTON NOVEMBER 1986 53 



Daringly Original Arcade Adventure, it's What You've Come 






1 

qS 

"S3 

g 

J5 






4 




£7.95 



TSRN1J) 



£7.98 



Available now for Commodore 64 and 
available soon for Spectrum 48.128 and 

Amstrad. 




T 



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FIREBIRD SOfTWAfiE 
FIRST FUOOfl. W-T6 NEW DxFQflD ST.. LOUDON WC1 A VPS 



MAL ORDER 

WdBMVMtvetltolrT^vW 

+ Hmr*n aPHgHttft SO«TrtAttf As 

m«i«((iv(T«n!B(«»s< 

HAIL ORDER AUHTC KAV. 'FAEEPOST FMEWRO. FWST 
R.DOH. M-T8 N£w GKFOM> ST.- UCWOON WC1A IPS. 

"No ^l^HWOJJir*tfj 



ACTION TEST 



SPACE SHUTTLE 

Aciivtsiori. £9.94 cass. £14.99 disk, keys 01 
joystick with keys 



NASA may not be allowed to ge" the real 
thing oil (Ik ground ai the r.-.a :iu:t.!. bill yor. 
can lake the shuttle Discovery up for a flight 
or two with this simulation by Sieve Kitchen. 
It doesn't give you ihe sort of freedom thai 
ordinary flight simulators have, It sets you a 
tough mission task: fly the shuttle to a strict 
flightpian. launch and dock with satellites. 

You can choose from three type? of 
flight number one is a demo thai shows you 
exactly how a perfect flight should pro- 
ceed; number two gives you control of 
most of the shuttle while the computer 
gives invaluable aid to the beginner; num- 
ber three leaves you on your own to solve 
all the problems. 



flight controls. The graphics are quite bare 
except for the payload-bay scene. The 
sound consists purely of engine noise and 
warning signals. As a simulator it 'a pretty 
good, but as a game it doesn't really have 
enough variety to keep you interested for 
long. 

FIRST-DAY TARGET SCORE 
Complete flight 2 







► You've always got plasty to do. 

► Good picture of (be pay lead bay, 

► Docking with satellites provides the 
lasting challenge. 



SECOND OPINION 

Morbid curiosity aside, there 's not a. 
lot to recommend this one. It fen 't 
realistic enough to bo a convincing 
simulator, but the Jack of freedom 
means it's not much of a game either. 
A worthy effort, but I just found it too 
dull. 

AW 



► No variety once you've Learnt the 

mission. 

*■ No freedom of action; you just have te 

follow the flight plan. 



Your view is from the shuttle's cockpit , 
with your essential instrumentation and 
onboard computer display, You atari on Ihe 
launchpad; the first task is to get the shuttle 
off the ground. A detailed launch guide 
tells you exactly how to do this step by 
step, but m the heal of the moment when 
you're under pressure you might forget 
something. 

Once in the air you need to follow a 
trajectory that the computer has plotted to 
get you into space, Once you're up 
there you've got to achieve a stable 
orbit before you eaxi launch the 
satellite. Once again you're 
given plenty of information 
on what to do, so that just 
following the instructions 
should get you through. 

New comes the fun part: 
launching the satellite. You are 
treated to an excellent view of the 
payload bay as the satellite spins out of 
it and then round to the front of the shuttle 
and off into orbit. 

Having got lid of one satellite you can 
go dock with some others, which enhances 
your rating when you get back to Earth, 
You can dock with as many as you Like, but 
each successive one gets harder lo do. 

GREEN SCREEN VIEW 

Hoprebioma with visibility, but it still 
domtnttook very retlistic- 

Once you're bored with whuzwg 
around the Earth you can re enter and land 
at Edwards Air Force base, Once again 
you're given detailed ins (ructions on how 
to get down and a trajectory to follow as 
you descend to the runway- When you get 
within range the runway appears in the 
view and you glide in for a landing, 

It will take a bit of practice before you 
can do the whole mission properly but it's 
quite easy to get started and to know the 






you just have to keep kicking and it wiU go 
in. The opposition will do likewise. To stop 
them you just have to run past them, turn 
around and run head-on into the relevant 
player, kicking wildly. 



r , - ■■■■ 



SECOND OPINION 

Dear me. Once upon a time, 
Mastertroiuc had a reputation for 
producing cheap trash. Through hard 
work and strict quality-con trol they 
cleared their name and showed the 
.world that cheap needn't mean nasty. 
Another game as miserably had as this 
One though, another one as 
unspeakably awful, and they'll be 
right back to square one. 

AW 



FIVE-A-SIDE SOCCER 

Mailertruiiic £3 .93 cass. icystick or kcvs 



Masteitronic have been producing some 
excellent games lateiy arid I suppose the 
run hod to come to an end somewhere. This 
is it. As football games go it's one of the 
wo; si I've seen. II doesn't even deserve a 
99p pncetag. newer mind the £2.39 it's 
costing. 

It folio ws the familiar pattern of oiher 
football games, but with less impressive 
graphics and gameplay. The pitch is 
viewed from the side and is composed of 
three screens, a goal at each end. The 
teams have five players each fgeema log- 
ical for five^a-aide football) with one player 
as the goalkeeper, who can't be moved out 
of the bo* around the goaL 

Vow control one player. You can either 
leave it to the computer to choose which or 
select 1 turn yourself by~ cycling through the 
players on Screen. You can compete either 
against the computer At against 3 male. 
Eiiher way mere isn't much variety to the 
playing action The computer" plays very 
predictably; although it will score goals 
yon can easily pul away more. 

The pStch is narrow. Because the rules 
are Sva-a T aide there aren't any comers, 
throw-ins or any other set pieces- 

The gameplay consists of getting 
behind the ball and booting it forward a 
few tunes; if you're lined up with- the goal 



If enemy action gets close to the goal, 
control switches to your keeper but its 
usually loo late to do anything abouta goal 
being scored. 



OiLir>k)f grap+iki 

and bad 

gcmijpfay 




The graphics are chunky and garish 
and the gameplay very monotonous. A 
rather sorry product, and the sooner it's 
forgotten the better. 

BW 



FfRST-DftY TARGET SCORE 
Beat the computer by 5 goals 



GREEN SCREEN VIEW 
Visibility problems are really neither 
here not there- [mean, the game is a 
complete hole in the ground, 

AW 







t 



W 



P- There'll be a lot of goals scored. 



8 



N 



* 



► Chunky, garish graphics, 

*■ Predictable computer oppatippf 

► Boring gameplay. 

*■ No other options or features except a 
two-player game 



^H-' '.'." 


18% 


Wwm 


SONUS 


30% 
17% 
1S% 


GRAB FACTOR 


STAYING POWER 






A A RATING 


11% 



OLYMPIAD '86 

Atlantis. £2.91 cass. jtrittcti or lt«ys 



Here's yet 
game L but c: 

Waggling or It 

five sports; weigh! 



tld-eveni spcrtt 
doesn't involve any. 

-.shing. ft tea lures 
fting. canoe-mo;, 100 



metres, skeet-shooong and discus. I don't 
think most snac: .'es are going to 

find much here I : 

Weight^:: 'he first event. You 

have to lift gradually heavier weights to 
leach a qualifying level ". .3 poorly 

drawn and inhimitfii Youi method of ma* 
long lifts is even worse: a potntei spins 
around a ore. bottom of the screen, 

and when it's pointing straight tip you have 
to press Fire Get « right and it s a 

good lift, miss it and you lose one of your 
three lives Ajs the weighs gel heavier ihe 
pointer . 



SECOND OPINION 

It's a funny old nnsin ess, this 
computer-games Jark, Just when you 

.-: you 've seen the worst game 
imaginable, someone goes and brings 
out something much, much worse. 
You '11 laugh at the graphics on this 
one, weep at the waste of three quid 
and fall asleep over the gameplay, I'd 
have preferred a waggling game, and 
1 hate waggling games- 

AW 



The second event, canoeing, has better 
graphics but familiar very simple game- 
piay Your canoe (a kayak, actually) ap- 
pears m ihe middle of the screen, vie . 
from above, and the occupant paddles with 
just two frames of animation Rocks appear 
at she bottom o( ihe screen, and move up it 
You have 10 move left and right to avoid 









56 NOVEMBER 1 986 AMSTRAD ACTION ^^--1™ 




ACTION TEST 



them If you hit a rock a life is lost, other- 
wise you have to cocnplete a certain dis- 
tance dawn the course. 

The I0O metres is r.cxt. Itere the anim- 
ation is batter but the gameplay just as bad. 
Tte run stays- in one spot on (he screen 
while the crowd jerks by behind him. To 
mate hint run faster you have to press Fife 
in conjunction with a spinning pointer, as in 
event our, bill this time you have to keep 
repeating il to keep the speed up arid make 
the qualifying time. 

The fourth event is skee! -snooting. 
although by this lime you'll probably want 
to do a bit of author-shooting. A cursor and 
two trees appear on set een and from (he 
bottom of the screen a grey brick will spin 
up. You have (o put the cursor over it and 
press Fire to destroy it before it flies off 
strreer. A set number of ske<2« have to be 
■hoi, but hiiting more gets you more points 




The final event (heavy Sigh of rebel) is 
the discus. You first have to sel the power 

of the throw with (he familiar spinning 
pointer and then the; angle by stopping a' 
number thai gradually increases. This lime 
a waits spinning brick moves across screen 
and you hope it pas$ftB the ' qualifying 
distance. 

Then tt's back to .the firs! event. Go 
tlirough it ail again with the qualifying 
getting tougher until you lose all three 
hves. 

The graphics are diatfuil, the soiinti is 
hopeless, the gamcplay is Horribly simple 
and even al &3 it's a waste of money. The 
fact that i's budget software is i\o tonger an 
excuse for bad product like this. 

BW 






Y TARGET SCORE 



GREEN SCREEN VIEW 
It you shelled out three quid for this, I 
should think green is the word, 

AW 



« 



W 



► Jt'S cheap. 

► It's guile tough as you progress, 



6 



ft 



W 



* The graphic* are bad. 
► Vary little flound. 
*■ Very aim pie gameplay . 
*■ Little variety tn your task. 







»:■:-.'■:■: 


GRAPHICS 


33% 
16% 
30*/. 
18% 
19% 


SONICS 


GfUfl FACTOR 


STAYING POWEfl 


A A RATING 



KNIGHT RIDER 

Ocean, ftlJB css-s. jovslirk or keys 



hope you haven't been holding your breath 
Tor this one because KITT appears to have 
been worked on in Ocean's garag* 
quite a while. Now he and hii do-gooder 
driver are out, but when you get a look at 
the game you re going to wish they'd 
scrapped him and cubed him in a metal- 
crusher. 

The game begins with our eager TV 
heroes revving to go m Atlanta. They can 
choose one of four dastardly plots to 'oil 
within a ftme limit. A network of roads 
connects several major citiea in the Excited 
States, and at each city there is an oper- 
ational base of some kind. These consist of 
a single screen On visiting the one at 
Atlanta you Tl discover where you need to 
go first. 

You choosB a. city oft a menu and then 
have to drive there. The view is- from. the 
driver's seat '- the only things- you'll see 
while travelling between cities are enemy 
heUcopters and the toad. 




SECOND OPINION 
It really looked at one point as if this 
one wasn't going to come out at a}}, but 
no such lack. If this was a budget game 
it would be mjserablQ value lor 
money. There's almost nothing to it, 
and what there is looks dated and 
pQprly executed. I'm amazed that 
Ocean have the gall to charge mosey 
for this at all, but £8.95 is just comical. 

AW 



This is the really exciting bit: the 
guards can shoot at you or touch you to 
knock a lot otl the lime limit. The guards at 
some bases will home in on yot ; because 
ihey're "trained killers' - which means they 
aren't wearing blinkers, unlike the rest of 
them who keep to movement patterns as 
you go straight by them, merely letting 
loose the odd bullet if you're in then path. 

If you get to she other side of the room 
you're given the next location to go ro. If 
you. can resist the overwhelming urge to hit 
the reset keys, you're' off on another car 
ride over a featureless highway 

The graphics are bad, the in-game 
Sound is bad, the Collision detection at 
£*e£Gs. is Jwusyi - the- gamfeplay t$ boring afid 
as licensing deals go this is the wcrs: 

BW 

FIRST DAT TARGET SCORE 

Stay awake 






You can choose to drive or shoot helic- 
opters, while KITT performs the Other joh. 

est to drive yourself And lei KITT da 
looting, since you can drive twice as 
fast and he'll probably shoot straighter. 

Driving is just a matter of accelerating 
as hard as possible arid steering around the 
•occasional incredibly predictable bend, It 
takes no skill. at ali Evert damage caused 
by missiles from the helicopters and bumps 
iide of the road doefiti't liven up 
the proceedings; IF you do want to shoot 
helicopters it's just. a mistier of guiding a 
ji aromxi the screen arid tir;iig an 
isivisibly laser. 

Aiier getting 'bbred at the wheal for an 
eternity yoii arrive- at the. city and can enter 
the operational base there. You now control 
a figure 'viewed 'from above who has to get 
from one side of a room to the other, 
avoiding contact with the guards therfl^ 



GREEN SCREEN VIEW 
You can still see well enough to play, 
I'm afraid. 

AW 



D 



W 



1 tiked the title tune. 



B 



D 



M 



E W 



►■ Unimpressive graphics. 

► Bad collision detection at bases, 
*■ Monotonous gameplay, 

K The worst-eve* licensing deal. 

> You have to waft for very slow- 
scrolling messages, 



GRAPHICS 



SONICS 



GRAB FACTOR 



STAVING POWER 



A A HATING 




I 



^ ■**>*. AMSTRAS AQTION NOVEMBER 1986 52 



ACTION TEST 



THE APPRENTICE 

Ntostcitromc. [( 99 cans joystick or keys 



The name of the game might be enough to 
give away the origin of this game but you'll 
be in no doubt as soon as you start playing. 
The classic Sorcery was obviously the in- 
spiration. Even though this game (by James 
Higgins) isn't as good as the original it has a 
lotto offer at £1.99. 

You play an ^prentice wizard who's 
made a real hash of a nasty spell, and has to 
rectify it by collecting 10 rings. To collect 
each ring you 'H need a little bit of help from 
a friendly wizard, who requires a specific 
object if he's going to help you out. If you 
can find the object and get it to the wizard, 



then he opens up a section of the game 
where a ring can be found. 

The screens axe very reminiscent of 
Sorcery, but the graphics aren't as at- 
mospheric or as fast-moving. There aren't 
any doors either so the apprentice just 
moves oS the edge of one screen and onto 
another. The apprentice moves about 
screen rather slowly but you can fly and 
walk him anywhere on screen. 



SECOND OPINION 
There's an awful lot to explore here, 
but not a great deal of incentive to do 
so, The graphics are okay, hut the 
gameplay just sort oi plods along. The 
nameitiAy suggest comparisons with 
Sorcery bat the action very deiinit&iy 
doesit T t. Still, it s cheap I suppose. 

AW 



There are plenty of threats to your 
meagre lives including arrows, skulls, 
spinning stars, birds, dragons and demons. 
These all follow movement patterns and 
car. be either avoided or btasied with your 
limited supply of hghtrungbolts. However 
that measure is only temporary: if you re- 
enter the screen the monsters will have 
reappeared. 



/ mi- 



ni 




The objects that allow the wizards to 
cast a magic spell include a treasure chest, 
flag, gold key and horseshoe. To find out 
which object works with which wizard you 
just have to drop it while standing on the 
same spot with him. If nothing happens 
you've got the wrong object. The right 
object wiD cause a section of the scenery to 
slide away and you can go through it to 
some new screens where a ring will be 
found. 



You can also remove sections of the 
scenery with a special scroll that can take 
out a chunk ol wall. This will make it 
possible or easier to get to an area of the 
game or an object. These need to be used 
sparingly, of course, just in case you come 
up against a real impasse. 

All ten rings have to be recovered 
within a time limit, but this is quite gener- 
ous and should give you ample time. 



An apprentice 



1 




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58 NOVEMBER 1986 AMSTRAD ACTION r»MVii*ni*. 



ACTION TEST 



Much more of a problem is landing on 
a screen to find a monster headed straight 
for yon or right on top of you. This can put 
you into an infinite death loop that can ruin 
a lot of hard work. 

Even though the game isn't original it's 
very competently done and provides an 
excellent challenge for any arcade adven- 
ture rs who liked Sorcery. Its major pro- 
blem is 3peedthe action is quite sedate. 
Despite that you've still got a lot to cope 
with and have to concentrate hard. 

BW 



FIRST-DAY TARGET SCORE 
10,000 



GREEN SCREEN VIEW 
Ugly but visible. 



\ ► Good colourful graphics and 
monsters. 

► Large, well designed playing area. 

► 10 wizards take quite a hit of finding, 

► Disappearing sections of scenery are 
good. 



► Action is quite slow. 
►* Not very original. 





r 


graph icsrytTi 


1 . 




S0NICS 


54% 
78%' 

33% 
16% 


GRAB FACTOR 


STAYING POWER 


A A HATING 



±?Z&ffi 






THE VERA CRUZ 
AFFAIR 

Intagrnmts. £9.95 cass. £14.95 disk, ke^s trnlv 



The latest French import puts you in the 

role of a gendarme investigating a suspici- 
ous death, which is first thought to he 
suicide but soon looks far more sinister. 
The game loads in two sections, the first 
one giving you a chance !o examine the 
scene of the incident and the second to 
investigate using the police computer 
network: 

The scene of the supposed suicide is a 
single, macabre but detailed and well 
drawn screen, dominated by the dead 
body of Mile Vera Cruz, Scattered around 
on the floor and furniture are various ob- 
jects and clues that have to be examined. 
You control a cursor on the screen that can 
be placed over the various objects, which 
can then be examined in greater detail to 
provide information that may be a clue or 
may be misleading. 



You 11 need to note down on paper all 
of the information you find because you 
can' I look at it again once you leave this 



are not exactly over- helpful on this mailer 
either, a situation exacerbated by their 
translation from, the original French. 




section of the program. Make sure you 
examine everything you can because even 
the smallest object may reveal something 
interesting. 

When you're finished, the second part 
of the program has to be loaded, This takes 
you to your office, where you can com- 
municate with all the other police and 
judicial services through the Diamond 
Computer Network. 

You have six main options while using 
me computer: send a message* print out a 
screen (if you've got a printer), see a 
statement from a witness, compare 
evidence, make an examination, and arrest 
[he guilty party. 



SECOND OPINION 

I'm sure (here's a good game in here, 
but poor translations and general 
unfjicndlin ess mean it's just too 
difficult to get at. Even the most patient 
of detectives can only pat up with 
'Addressee inapplicable' so many 
times before he hands in his badge, 

AW 



The other options are much easier to 
use since they require less composition of 
messages. There are still hitches though: 
when performing an examination, for 
example, you are told you can make a 
'graphological' examination, but you're not 
told exactly haw to do that. 

If you can penetrate these problems 
there is a very good game underneath with 
plenty of nice touches- There are the facial 
pictures of suspects, the need lor deductive 
reasoning and of course the need for a 
policeman's perseverance. It's a shame that 
this is marred by the impenetrable replies 
of the computer to so many enquiries, 
"addressee not applicable' and 'without in- 
terest". A good game, but one that could do 
with being a lot more helpful and user- 
friendly. 

BW 





Messages can be sent to various bran- 
ches of the local and national police, 
piisons and judicial information centres, in 
an attempt to gain useful information. Or 
messages can be used to find out further 
details on an individual who may be known 
to one of the other services. Or police 
elsewhere on the network may know some- 
thing of a particular piece of evidence. 

The main problem with these commun- 
ications is that you have to get only one part 
of the message wrong and you always get 
the same message 'Addressee not applic- 
able'. This moans you don't know whether 
you made a typing mistake, used the wrong 
form of message or the service really had 
no information on the question. 

Consequently you can be fishing about 
in the dark not knowing what's going on, 
purely because you can't communicate with 
the computer properly. The instructions 



GREEN SCREEN VIE W 
Still ptey&bte, and still unpenetrable. 

AW 



GOOD W E W S 

► & difficult case that takes tome 
solving. 

*■ Niuo touches like the suspects' faces. 

► Needs a lot of thought. 



a 



ri 



£ 



w 



► Very unhelpful responses to 
unproductive questions. 

►■ Translation is unhelpful in places. 

► Takes a tot of getting into. 







mmssm 

mmm 
mmm 


GRAPHICS 


70% 
14% 

53% 
71% 

64% 


SONICS 


GRAB FACTOR 


STAYING, POWER 


A A RATING 



itotojitengi^ AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 59 



ACTION TEST 



CON-QUEST 

MasferlrQflit. 12 38 cess, joystick or keys 



At first sight you might be templed to write 
this off as just another game where you run 
round umpteen screens picking up some 
things and shooting monsters. However a 
closer look reveals more depth to the game 
(by Derek Brewster), with lots of different 
objects that can be examined and used in 
different ways. 

The action takes place in a castle which 
has bean occupied by the demon Grell and 
his monstrous minions. Your task as the 
cute character Oscar is to rid the castle of 
Grell, but you've got to do a Jot of explor- 
ing and use many objects to achieve that, 

The casllea rooms are shown in 3D 
from one side. Most of them have lurnilure, 
wall decorations and of course monsters. 
Meet of it is well drawn, but suffers from an 
unimaginative use of colour: each charac- 
ter, object and furniture item is just a single 
colour. There's a maximum of three mon- 
sters to a room and they whizz about 
randomly, sapping your energy when they 
touch you. 

You can combat the creatures with 
weapons that you find, including a boome- 
ranging axe and a magic wand, but you'll 



need some knowledge as well before you 
can use the wand Once you've picked up 
an object you can use three other options 
on an icon menu at the bottom of the screen: 
drop it again, examine or use it. Sometimes 
examining it will reveal some useful in- 



SKCOND OPINION 
This ones fairly good value and 
there s a lot fo see, but it's *fl pretty 
(treaty stuff. Th&r& is only so much 
you can do with this kind oi 
exploration/collection effort. Weil 
enough presented, but nothing at all 
original or exciting. 

AW 



formation; whan trying to use it you may be 
told you don't yet know how to. 

Usually you can carry up to five items 
and be able to examine and use any of 
them. There is a globe of invulnerability - 

yau can store Up 10 nine items in it and 
trundle it around the rooms, but you i-int 



The graphics are the most disappointing 
thing about the game. 

The gameplay. however, has a lot to 
offer in the way of exploring, shooting and 
the odd bit of puzzling. There's nothing 
very original here but this type of game 
hasn't appeared so much on the Amatrad as 
on other machines, so a lot ol you should 
enjoy it, 

BW 

FIRST-DAY TARGET SCORE 

40% 



GREEK SCREEN VIEW 
Visible en&ugh, though the odd bit of 
htti&-oto"bl6ck cause* ptoblems, 

AW 










K_9 Bil Eifl El 


E^^Q 



► Quite a large playing area* 

► Good use of Icons within the game, 

► Lots of objects to use. 

h- Good combination, of exploring, 
shooting and puzzling. 




to 



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use objects from inside it so you won't be 
able to kill oS creatures on your way. 

There are many of the standard 
arcade-adventure features to the game like 
keys that will unlock doors to reveal more 
of the playing area. There are also healing 
and poison potions, so be sure you know 
which is which. 

Theie isn t much sound in the game but 
what effects there are are nicely done. 
Some of them appear to pop up during play 
for no apparent reason, but the random 
twiddles and bloops are quite pleasing. 



► Unimpressive use of colour. 

► Not much variety In the gameplay . 



| SMPWCS 



SONICS 



GRAB FACTOR 

STAYIWG FQWta 

A A HATING 




60 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 mm^m. 



ACTION TEST 



GOLDEN PATH 

Amfiflft, £ 12.95 disk, key; 01 joy slick with keys 



There still aren't tog many disk-Only games 
around, despite the huge success of the 
6138, Tfcis effort from Amsoft (written by 
Magic Logic) is set in [ho Orient, where a 
monk has to achieve enlightenment by 
lighting mcense before the great Buddha in 
a golden temple. To achieve that you've got 
to solve a fait few arcade-adventure pro- 
blems ^nd explore ihe delightfully drawn 
scenery of the far east. 

The name of the game derives from the 
yellow line that tie monk: follows through 
the screens in the game as they wind up 
find down the hills and to various locations. 
You can't deviate off the line, but there are 
junctions where it forks or loads into build- 
ings. Your life as a monk start* as a young 
man and the quest has lo be completed 
before you age loo much and become an 
ex-monk that has ceased 10 be. 

As you wander along the path you'll 
encounter animals and people who may 
block it and have to be dealt with somehow- 
This could be by giving 
them an object or 



SECOND OPINION 

Well what do you know - it's a game 
that's unplayable in a whole now way. 
I'm just amazed at the nerve it must 
take to market this thing. There may 
be some interesting puzzles in here, 
but nobody 's going to have the 
patience to get anywhere with tflgftt, 
Dazztmgly stupid. 

AW 



by fighting them - the only way to find out 
is lo try it. There are also mechanisms that 
can be used, but again you may need Ihe 
fight Object Or person to activate it. 

Objects you find can be carried, stored 
in one of your four pockets, or even thrown 
at something. You've also got the ability lo 
jump, duck, block, punch and push you 
can also experiment on people and objects. 
Many of the animals and people will attack 
you: unless you're prepared with an 
adequate defence you'll lose a life. (Pre- 
sumably as a Buddhist you don't kill 
Others.) 

Making your way along the path isn't 
always easy. It disappears in places, and 





A monlt't l''r H net 

□ ho pp v urn? 



you have to search for possible rou tea- 
Far mora annoying is the way the disk- 
drive is continually accessed. Whenever 
you change screens, perform some actions 
or die. the disk always spends an eternity 
whirring around to load mare data. This 
quickly gets very wearing and tedious and 
is exacerbated by the need to flip the disk 
over when entering some parts of the 

game. 

There's actually a reasonable arcade- 
adventure game: the graphics look good 
and there are some pleasant puesJes. iut 
putting up with the wildly infuriating disk 
problems while trying to explore Will be a 
bit too much to ask even of the mast patient 
game splay ex. 

BW 



GREEN SCREEN VIEW 
T7i6 landscapes lose a lot of their 
scenic appeal, and that's ptetty 
serious. After all, you 're going to be 
staring at them for a long rime waiting 
for the dink to stop rwmmg, 

AW 



N 



W 



► Good graphics for character* and 

backgrounds. 

I* Some interesting puzzles to solve. 



B 



D 



W 



*• Tha disk-accessing would try the 

patience of a saint. 

*■ Not only continual accessing but you. 

have to flip the disk over as well, 

► Incredibly difficult to explore the 

tfimc and discover things while trying 

to put up with such problems. 



GRAPHICS 


74% 
37% 


Socc 

mm 


SONICS 






GRAB FACTOR 


15% 
42% 


STAVING POWER 






A A RATING 


31% 



AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 61 



PREVIEWS 



PRODIGY 

Electric Dreams 



S«i» th* M«cW«^ ^ fl» Mftchifte Sorcerer 
Wardlock, (hi*/ impending Electric Breams 
title is an ai cade adventure. There's no- 
thing new about the perspective you view 
the Ifitechlabs in rough - It** good old i*o- 
metric 3D jus! like B&tm&n - bat where 
ccKrveoaonal games switch «cieen* t Are* 
di'gy usb« & scrolling display, 

Yoa pftsy Solo the Syntieman, an ex- 
perimental synthetic feamw created by 
Waidlock, and your task is to ftscape from 
the Mechjibs. Thai's nol ail - you have to 
take yotiT friend Nejo with you. Nerjo is only 
a baby though, so you 'II hare to food him, 
protect him and change his nappy while 
collecting the items you need to escape. 

There are dangers along the way in the 
form of WardJock's earlier attempts at syn- 
thetic life, the Bloberites and the Globe* 
wels. There are also some tricky obstacles 
in the form of icy surfaces and invisible 
walla, and there's a tefepen network to 
learn your way round, tf you're an explor- 
ation freak with a taste for cote graphics, 
this i* one to watch out for. 





TRAIL BLAZER 



Thia fast arcade-action game previewed at 
the PCW show is another example of the 
latest games crane - abstract bounce-em- 
upst Gremlin is hardly jumping on (he 
bandwagon, mind your with AA Rave Thing 
on li Spiing And Mastergame Bounder, they 
practically invented bouncing. 

The game idea runs like this; you 
control a ball as it bounces down a long 
multi-coloured path. You have lo get to the 
other end within a given lime limit t using 
the different colour ad squares to help you. 
Some squares make you bounce, some 
speed you up and some slow you down 
Worit of all are blue squares which re- 
verse your controls if you land on them, 
and the numerous holes in the path which 
lose you considerable amounts of time. 

lake all the most addictive games, it 
just sounds too simple to work, It's not just 
addictive though - with your viewpoint 
directly behind the ball, (he path zooming 
by underneath yow, it's exhilarating and 
graphically appealing. Wacky extra fea- 
tures on the disk version should give you a 
few laughs as well. 

Watch out for the full review next 
month. 






62 AM5TRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 









fT'i... -- 3 


5 5 




■■■■■■i 




t ^ 

i 


■." 




:• 



!I: 







dungeons can be a righ 



m 



it down. 



Dandy is the massive arcade adventure that takes you 

through some of the most dotted dungeons you've ever 
seen , Either solo or with a (brave) friend you can (lack, 
thump and sap your way through spectres, necromancers 
and other dungeon-dwellers whose concern tor your health 
and well-being is zero. 



They have their reasons of course. They're guarding a 
massive treasure hoard which you. if you re quick, can stuff 
into your amazingly capacious swag bag. 

Dandy is the ultimate dungeon. Enter at your peril " 



FEATURED 

3 complete 5 level dungeons 

Treasure trove screens at itte end of each dungeon 

One or two ptayers 

5 different spell types 

A variety of nasties 

Frenzied, thumb-busting action 

—4 AVAILABLE ON: 1 _V 

"CO? iTtetT|tflYid Comnfc; 

'rnpuiar' 





PI 






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I 



S t 1 W A ft C 

ELECTRIC DREAMS SOFTWARE. 
CARLTON CRESCENT, SOUTHAMPTON 
SOt 2LW TEL: (0703) 22969-i 

Mail Order: Electric Of earns Software, 

23 Pond Street, Hampstead, 





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jeirf«»to(fciy«ifl l?ji*(*ia^rtrftii:«ijii j 
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m*J^1 Tr J*vj* tresvrt: 



m First Division 

ignis arid opted to 

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ilhis promising 

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* team manager D 1 

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C16 + 4 ttSX Spectrum 48 

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Had to Iftff, feftffcf F%/ 
Despite the Cowled Crusader** 
attempts to take a well-deserved holiday this month, 
Warlock Nicholson has summoned me from my retreat at 
Land's End to provide thee with these pages of dazzling 
entertainment. 

So put on thy sunglasses, and get thee stuck ittka tiw 
month' a offering from the man with the Amhre Sotom 
and the «py oftniermptor's After Shock? 




After Shock 

Interceptor, £9,95 eass, £24.95 disc 

Interceptor has been on the verge of producing its latest game 
Earthquake for some months now. The company finally re- 
leased it at the PC W show in September with a new name and - 
eek! - a fatal bug. Typing PRESS, or other ill-fated commands, 
would instantly produce a screenful of garbage and prevent 
further progress in the game. 

The Cowled Crusader is glad to report that this mishap 
(due to an over enthusaistic disk-protection program) has now 
been cleared up. So you can buy the game with confidence as 
far as bugs are concerned. 

But what about the adventure itself? Is it really worth £3.95? 
Seems a bit steep for a game these days unless it's really hot- 
Well, the first thing is that I wasn't able to make much 
progress in the game due to the aforementioned bug. but I have 
managed to gather enough info and gain some first impressions 
that should give you something to go on - I'll print a follow-up 
review next month. 

Interceptor's previous games have had a COuple of major 
disadvantages and one big asset; lack of text, too easy, and 
brilliant graphics respectively. After Shock, you'll be pleased to 
hear, has managed to a certain degree to correct the two 
failings and retain the pretty pics. 

First, the location descriptions. These are considerably 



■ "V ;■*■*■; $v*KllVi>sY 



longer than earlier Interceptor offerings and give a good 
atmosphere to a game in which you must traverse a ruined city 
after an earthquake and fix a nuclear reactor before it blasts off 
into space with most of the surrounding couniryside. 

The only thing 1 felt was that the longer descriptions tempt 
you to be more ambitious in your commands, but in fact the 
vocabulary, though larger than previous titles, still isn't quite as 
good as the descriptions might suggest. A long description of a 
lift, for instance, might tempt you to examine the various parts 
mentioned, only to get "Try something else' or an equivalent 
rejection. Alter Shock doesn't tell you which word it's having 
difficulty with, which can make certain pussies more difficult H^*' 
than they might otherwise need to be. ( 

Which leads onto the question of difficulty, A couple of 
earlier Interceptor lilies - Forest at the World's End in parti- 1 / 
cular - the Cowled Crusader found far too easy. Interceptor 
claim that After Shock is far more difficult but until I've had a 
chance to get further into an unbugged version of the game I 
can't comment. First impressions are that the game is a little 
more devious than Interceptor's earlier releases, which is of 
course good news. 

After Shock was written by the same author as Jewels of 
Babylon and Heroes ofKam The storyline looks good, and the 
pictures {some of which boast animated bils, which are quite 
striking) are every bit as good as we've come to expect from 
this company. Unfortunately there are only 16 of them t iiut I 
suppose you can't have everything. 

My feeling is mat with only around 120 locations and a 
rather antiquated parser this game is very slightly overpriced 
at £9,9S. But stay tuned for next month's follow -up review for the 
final verdiet- 



Ppppiciopapuqrm! AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 67 




SPECTRUM 

COMMODORE 

& AMSTRAD 

HOME COMP U TERS 



*$ 



S f T w A a I 

Electric Dreams Software. 

31 Carlton descent, 

Southampton. Hampshire SOI 2EW. 

Tel: (G703i 229694 



Rebel Planet 

Adventure Soft or U.S. Gold, £9.35 cass, £14.95 disk, keys 
only 

Adventure Soft is very lively concern near Birmingham master- 
minded by Mike Woodroffe of the old Adventure International 
software house. Mike is. however, anxious to dispel any 
associations with previous releases bat even so t feel it's worth 
mcntoning the connection because AI was nothing if not prolific 
in its output (in its day) and I have high hopes of this new 
company. 

Adventure Soft has the game rights to Isaac Asimov's range 
of books, and the company also puts out games based on the 
Fighting Fantasy series as devised by Steve Jackson and Tan 
Lsvmgston. Tift from this latter siable that Re&el Planet 
emerges. 

The game was written by Stefan Ufnowaki and Roger Taylor 
of Adventure Soft and features some very attractive graphics. 
The screen layout is in some ways similar to earlier Adventure 
International titles: a horizontal 3plit display with a neat graphics 
window and a scrolling text area below. There the comparisons 
end, however, since the vocabulary is quite a bit larger than 
earlier AI releases - about 400 words and the parser handles 
some more complex inputs - GO WEST AND EAST THEN OPEN 
THE DOOR for example. 

The graphics are very attractive and include some ani- 
mated sequences As you begin the game on board the 
merchant ship Caydia you will see the stars shooting pasi the 
command module window, while at other points of the game 
various monsters or objects will flicker into life while you 
wonder what to type in next, The animation isn't exactly 
stunning, but it undoubtedly adds something to the overall feel 
of the game. 

The plot in Rebel Planet involves your finding your way to a 
'queen computer" which is controlling the Arcadian EmpiTe 
troops who are invading the galaxy and threatening civilisation 
as we imagine il. The biggest problem involves liaising with 
your ship's pre-progr;wir-fid flight path: just occasionally you'll 
find yourself stranded on a planet as the Caydia happily jets off 
to another destination. You can. however, delay lake-off in a 
dire emergency, but this feature can be used only once in a 
game. 

I enjoyed playing Rebel Planet. It's not the most astonish- 
ingly innovative game around, but the puzzles are logical and 
there's enough here to keep you going for a few days. I liked 
the idea of having to contact other spies for information, and the 
spaceship schedules caused additional challenging problems. 
However Adventure Soft's policy is to stick to sure-fire commer- 
cial successes, and to some extent I believe thai the company's 
adventure system (which saves time and therefore money) is 
slightly lacking in inspiration: 400 words isn't a very large 
vocabulary by today's standards and there are no RAMS AVE or 
OOPS options, for example, though J hear that these are to be 
introduced m later tides. 

Wsich out for reviews of Adventure Soft's latest titles in the 
next issue. In the meantime you could do worse than crash the 
'queen computer' in Rebel Planet. 





Adventure contact 

Pat Winstanley of Adventure 
Probe magazine - which I ment- 
ioned a while back - has now 
written to ask me if I would 
mention Adventure Contact: 

'Adventure Contact ts tn- 
to.nded to help novice writers to 
understand the intricacies of 
utilities such as OAC and The 
Quill and at the same time pro- 
vide a source of play-testers 
and so on for more experienced 
writers who have completed 
gair.es The magazine also aims 
to provide information and help 
for those writers who wish to 
market their own games, by act' 
ing as a source cf information on 
suppliers and markets far 
instance ' 

Sounds like a good idea to 
me. Pat's address, if you're in- 
terested, ts 13 Holltncjcon Way. 
Wigan. WN3 6LS. 

Such rudeness 

'Congratulations with your Ad- 
venture Corner m Amslrad Ac- 
tion,' writes Jaehee Lee of the 
Netherlands. Then he spoils it 
all by saying, 7 still think tttttt 
the adventure column in Com- 
puter and Video Games ts the 
beat, but you are a very good 
number two!' 

This is too much for the Pilg 
to bear. The Cowled Crusader 
simply will not accept second 
place. As it happens, I am 
pleased to announce that from 
year's end the PUg's pages will 
present 3 major reorganisation 
and facelift, including maps, 
more tips, more games re- 
viewed, and more of the inimit- 
able, unbeatable me. 

And as for you, Jaehee 
•» The fialrog is on its way - 
please speak nicely to it, offer it 
a knife and fork, and then sit on 
a large plate - 

Attaining impossible 

"Can you advise me about the 
best way to market a game with- 
out getting ripped off and how 
to copyright it?' aaks David Barr 
of Antrim. 

Hrnmmm,..This question is 
often asked. David - and parti- 
cularly now we have adventure- 
writing utilities such as GAC 
and The Quill. There are two 
points to be made. Fast, the law 
surrounding copyrigtu of com- 
puter programs is still in a cer- 
tain amount of disarray. You 
can, however, protect yourself 
to a certain degree by: 

ensuring thai your name, the 
data, and a copyright message 
is encoded into the program in 




ASCII at a fixed address and is 
also prominent or all packaging 
t> lodging a copy of the 
program {with labelling as 
above) with your bank or a 
similar inaniuiion so that in the 
event of a claim you can prove 
your prior possession of the 
game 

As for marketing' the game, 
] trunk it :s fair to sij that there 
are virtually no successful soft- 
ware houses in the UK who Will 
deliberately rip off a program- 
mer who sends in a game for 
evaluation. There are also virtu- 
ally no successful programmers 
who do not feel thai they have 
been cither underpaid or other- 
wise abused by one software 
house or another. 

It id unwise to Attempt to 
market a game yourself unless 
you feel that you have no 
alternative. 

Level 9 lash-out 

And now a rather odd letter 
from no less a gen I than Pete 
Austin of Level 9 fame. It run- 
neth as follows: 

"The Graphic Adventure 
Creator from Incentive Software 
seems quite a good product and 
has been getting seme clever 
marketing of late. Indeed, some 
people may ever; have gained 
the impression that it is equiva- 
lent to Level 9's adventure sy- 
stem ..." 

Hmmrrirn... Have they re- 
ally? t honestly find this difficult 
lo believe Level 9's system is 
not available for public use so 
the only real comparison thai 
could be made would be be- 
tween games produced by the 
two different systems, rather 
than the systems themselves 
However, let us continue,,. 

'We compared Level 9's sy- 
stem with the newest version of 
Incentive's GAC, on the Gom^ 
modore $4: 

&> Adventure Facilities. 
The GAC scams to omit many 
features which we take for 



granted 

nowadays: eg. RAM 

SAVE, OOPS, multi-tasking and 

arrays. 

Memory left for adven- 
ture. Level $ has spent months 
carefully optimising the 
machine-code kernel of our ad- 
vnture system so it wastes the 
minimum of space. Where the 
GAC reports only 23K free for 
the adventure. Level 9's system 
provides 39K. Thai's 70% more. 

> Graphics. The GAC's 
pictures look very pretty, until 
you realist ■ thai the six pictures 
in its demo game use over 1 IK. 
That's more than all 200 pictures 
in a typical Level S game put 
together. Or to put it another 
way, just six pictures use half 
the total memory available lor 
the entire GAC adventure! 

Program compression. 
Level 9 has spent years optimis- 
ing compression techniques 
and, taking Price of Magik as an 
example, 160K if adventure 
logic source compiles down to 
just 1SK. ' 

Well, the letter continues, 
but I don't think we need say 
any more. Pete has made his 
point, but for the life of me 1 
can't see why he bothered! It 
would be different if his system 
were up on the shop shelf 
beside GAC. bur it isn't. And in 
the meantime I still reckon thai 
GAC tops the league of adven- 
ture generators and I still re- 
ckon that many of the readers' 
games sent to me written using 
the utility are of excellent qu- 
ality. Perhaps, dare I suggest. 
its the quality of the competition 
rather than the utilities used to 
produce it that's got Level 9 
won led? 

One interesting point to 
emerge from Pete's letter, how- 
ever, is a brief sample of some 
Level & A-Code - the stuff they 
use to write their games. In this 
short section, we encounter a 
goblin who won't let you pass 
unless paid with a bar of gold: 



fcV--: 



.tfOVEPASTGOPLlH HffvtNfXT 

MESSAGE 0YPAYPWS1 

fttnififc 

itSSftOE DOHTWAHTTMA g 

FETURN i 

5S55witai!-TrTW I; 

1 GIVENEXT ^ _^_ ^V^ 



This month's charts were really interesting for two reasons. 
First, there were many more voles than ever before, and 
readers nominated a wider range of games. Global "s Old 
Scores gol several mentions, as did Bored of tfte Rings and 
although neither actually made it into the Top Ten it was good to 
seem them being put forward along with games like Robui of 
Sherlock. Subsunk. and a host cf other titles. All this goes to 
show that adventurers are broadening their tastes and adding 
to their collections as the Amstrad adventuring market comes of 
age. 

Here goes then with this month's Top Ten h and this month's 
Lucky Klg whose entry was picked out of the Cowled 
Crusader's folded cape; John Clark of Tyne; and Wear, who 
receives a free copy of The Hobbi thorn Melbourne House, 

Don't forget to vote early for next issue. Help make this 
chart an important aid to all other adventurers who may be 
wondering what to spend their hard-earr.ed pennies on. Tour 
opinions count, and you could walk away with some free 
software into the bargain! 

Adventure Top Ten... 

1 Red Moon (Levels) 

2 Never Ending Story (Ocean) 

3 The Hobbit (Melbourne House) 

4 Lord Of the Rings (Melbourne House) 

5 Heroes of Kara (interceptor) 

6 Warlord (Interceptor) 

7 Hitch titers Guide (tifocom) 

8 Worm in Paradise (Levels) 

9 Heavy on the Magick (Gargoyle) 

10 Emerald Isle (Level 9) 








To The Pilgrim 

Amstrad Action 
The Old Bars 
Somerlon, Somerset 
TA1I SAH 

My favourite three adventures are: 

Game Company 

1 

2 

3 

The reasons for my first choice above are: 

The free game I would like if I'm a lucky Pilg is: 

My name: 

My address (BLOCK CAPITALS ONLY PLEASE): 



ADVENTURE 



=*^ 



Thi* moikih his wen i bumper crop of applicants for immortality in the Lords ud 

Ladies column. UnforturuilcSy wo lunm'I room lo fil you all in dus time, but tijth™ of 

the Chosen Ones who can't be included here wiE be earned forward to n*xc 



is issue. 

Tn» Pitg gets many laquewx for n*:p. bttt as 1 often point oat I'm a±r*id I limply 

haven't ox* the tima ro mivfi tharo aL - or wen ui ir.any case? to acknowledge 

th*m. So please twice good u*e ol dw Lord* and Ladies, who have put in mmy 

hours of keyboard- tapping and ftalrog-bashing so dial they can give you the benefit 

of their experience 

If you should ha»a any cause for complaint about anyone in the Lords and 

Ladjvi column, Let me know, Thar* hive been terrible isles of Lord) vrho have 

boasted, of their accomplishments but have not actually finished the games! This 

terrible crime will not go unpuxubad if discovered! 

And make sure you don't give thr Lards and Ladles therr.selves any cause for 
rorr.plmnt Always enclose s self-addressed siamped anYclcpc fitvc: phone them 
liter 1 ic r.ighl . Think youl 

Mindshadow, Hevar-Ending Story. E*piona?e Island. The babbit. Price of Magik, 
Mordom Que/t, Rtturrt to Eden, Bond of the Ring* 

Rod Pvnlop, 43 SutborUnd lianui, Poll ak ihlelcLs, Clisgaw, C41 4ET 

/brow at Sam, Wailocd, Jfevei Ending Story. Sub-Sunk. $*a-Ba*a Pen*. Fentttt* 

Diamond 

Jul** GrimJey. 5 Folly Lint, Armagh, N Inland, BT60 LAI 

GeJgml Adventure. Forr.it at the World's End, Mcm*gv tioni AmJfvmwJ*. Had 

Moon 

JUex JUxd, 13B ftrornford Hold, Hedge Hill, Birmknglurrv BiE 9HJt 

Stibjujilt Heroes cfk'*rt> 

Rlctuurd Shield, 126 Carlingtaow Lane, Bfcllcy, Wcit York*, WTI7 8DW (Tel; 

|0M4) 41 4139) 

Keiiiin Jo JEtfeA. Loray yfMidfj-g'hf. TheHohbit, M&ispoit. Spellbound. Sub-Sunk 
P*ul Sugg, ?,S9 B arrow by Ro4d. Grantham, Lines, NG31 nNTft 

Colossal Adventure. Adventure Quest. Dunrraort Adventure, Lords of Time, 
Emarnld !skf, Upturn m Eden. Snowball. Worm m Paradite. Red Maori. Price of 
Magik, Sored oftha Pings, Seas of Blood, Souls of Darken, Maidens Quest, Rohm of 
Sherwood, N#v4t~kndittg Story, Lords of Midnight, Bunestcne, Espionage island. 

ir.es Curse, Ship of Doom. Planar of J^cnih, Message from Andromeda, Je vela q! 
Babylon, rferoeaofEam, Forest at World'* End, Warlord.. The Hatha 
Petw Brown, SI Ropers. XTtnvt, CklngioTd. Lnndcn. £4 8EG 

Forest at the World'* End. Message from Altdxomttda, Hobbit 
Thorn.** McMwroW*. J McDonald Street, Dundee, Dl>3 TBI* 

Spellbound, jaival* of Babylon. Substiltlc, Sottbaso Dalit, Heavy on- the Magik. 
Swords and SorcerySedA Jones, SZ Riveridalc, Llandaf North, Car dill, & Wall* 

Gremlins, Hobbit, ft ever-Ending Story 

hin Coalhuri, SnelLoA CotLagt, ItaAeley, KftJU-*i.h*wmgli, N Tork i 

Forettat th* World'* End, Jewala ot Babylon, afoaaaga front Andromeda, Heroes ol 

Kant. Sored of the Ring*, Snowball. Gam* of$ir*du* 

l*iti Fxitdl*. 9 Clss-tford Road, Stnlnaven, Lanark shLre, Scotland, ML 10 6LL 

Haroea of Sam, Empire of Sam, Crystal* of Cam*. Jawti* of Babuhn. Sabttmk, 
Saabata Delta, Worm in Paradi** t Voodoo Cattle, Tatrormolwo*. Mardons Quest, 
NwvarmKting StQIf, Mmdshadow. Urban Upstart. Robin of SJtanrood, Hamprttiad, 
Wilifd of JUcyrx. Hehbit, Time IXachif.m. Circus Arrow of Heath Part S, Emerald 
fsl* Lord* of Tintf. Gremlin*, Sarceror afClaymorgue Cdsllc. Red Moon. Ten Little 
tnditft*. P&rteu* and Andromeda.. Zzax, Feasibility Experiment, Valkyrie 17, Bored 
of the Ring*. ft'r»W Adventure, Very Big Cave Adventure, Valhalla. Goldtn Baton. 
Sing of Piiv/ai, Advtmtut»ttnd, Colossal Adventure. Quest for the Holy Gritil, The 
Inaudible Hulk, Puce Of Magic. Return W Ed«n. Snowball, Tfw Pilgrim, The Snow 
Queen. Espionage island, bic* Curse, Fenfilla, The Helm, Lard of tiut Rings. Ship of 
Doom, Zorkl, Spidenr.tn. Wutlonf, Forest at thv World * End, Planet of Death 
fchn R Bamsley, AdrcnroToicTi*, 32 Merrlrale Road, Riling Bie«k, Stafford, 
Staffs, iTl I &EB 

All Interceptor gami» 

Peler Lnglis, Ar Dachaidh, Archive, Kyle, Rotl-tAtrt, I¥40 BEB 

Warlord 1 , Red MoOn, Hero** of Sam. Lotda ■of Time, Mataage from Andromeda 

W*yitaamdSW, Forert at World'* End. Suhfitn*: 

Simon Miribill. 23 Springfield Wit. Stockton Lui, T«k, TO30HN 

Seshame Delia, Teiwrmoiino* 

The bfaiue Utd L«no SelpUn*, 6 Penrhyn ATenaa, Lftheiland, LlTrrpooi, LZ1 

OTD 

htotdota QtieJt, Jewels of Babylon. Herat-* OfXajfn. Souls OfDarkOJi, M**t*g* from 

Andromeda., Forest at World's End, Smugglers Cove, Red Moon, Warlord, Emerald 

Ma 

Mia Shirley Wall. 38 Glabdands. Westfield Radatock, Bath. Avon, BA3 MTJ 

Forest at World's End, Jewels of Babylon. Lordoftho RmgxPart f 

Jarr.i-o McMitqn, J ?. Sid^n-rad flgldltiga, Sl«nehon.Bej LuLarkshUr, ML9 jkG 



70 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 



Fallowing my request for some lips an some lesa-pubiiciasd 
games, 1 received a tidy little batch of clues front Pat Winstanley 
ol Adventure Coniaci. So here goes with another selection of 
head -spiriting tips for those in sticky situations. 



Stick lo pushing hy ihe window 

Ciimb out at the deep freeze 

Check the Amstrad manual for colour coding 

Redhawk 

Lesley wants soinettung pretty ... 

Don't drop the vase - take it to a museum 

Castle at Skull Lord 

Chop tree for something nautical 

Wake the bear, but be ready to feed it 

Dig snow to find another way through 

Clobber the dog with a bone 

The mar. needs some first-aid - a bandage 




Island of Riddles 

Vault nvei lo gel across 



use a branch 
riit the stone to light the lamp 



Al^trad 

Examine the tree, open the safe 

The river u alcoholic ... and so is fuel! 






SPECTRUM 

COMMODORE 

&AMSTRAD 

HOME COMPUTERS 



s e f t w 



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Electric Dreams Software. 

31 Carlton Crescent, 

Southampton Hampshire S01 2EW. 

Tel: (0703) 229694 






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14 NOVEMBER 1986 



wW tMD«jna H "-" i — 




ya.oniiizi.iteiwgiaK. &MSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 75 



Bob Wade checks out your tips, pokes and game- 
busting ploys, The best ones covld win a entire issue's 
AA Raves! So why not send YOUR latest gem to: Cheat 
Mode, Amstrad Action, Somerton, Somerset, TA11 
5AH. 



AIIaji TrotRLks from Chisel- 
den feu everything you want 
to know about tilt bewitching 
game- With his tip* and our 
map from iiine 12 you «ht>nJ d 
b* able to cradt toe gun*. 

The beet place to start is in 
the throne room. This is 
because it is in the middle of the 
caatle and gives easy access to 
three of the collectable item*, 
which you should get in rhi* 
order: 

Shield - Go into the roof above 
the shield and drop through the 
hole onto h, bouncing straight 
back into the room so that the 
gargoyle doesn't, tip you off inic 
thin am. Be careful not to land on 
the gargoyle's head when you 
come through or you're in big 
trouble. 

Crown - Bounce onto Che sec- 
ond step then bounce again and 
you will get the crown. Go left 
two sateens and bounce at fun 
onto the gargoyle and back 
again. Then bounce back onto 
the gargoyle and hold the joy- 



N^9? 



i*** 



i.*- 








:"¥.■ - ■:•-■ 


can get the gobleL Bounce back 
immediately and retrace back- 
wards off the ledge to the left. 
Axe i Keep going left and pick 
up the axe. Keep going left una) 
you drop and then jump out of 
the window onto the roof. 
Scdssoro - Bounce left and out of 
the fat ieft roof hole (avoiding 
gargoyles head), collecting (he 
magic and tailing to pick up the 
scissors. 

Now the hard bit. Go 
through the castle to the roof 
above where the shield was and 
go right. Go up the platforms to 
the top of the roof. Go right to 
where the spider is and with 
one big jump gel onto the plat- 


CAULDRON 

1 '■. Ik 


5 '••'ffi-swSak 


form above him, and out of (he 
suck left ami] (he bounce has top right Up the next screen to 
calmed dowm, then bounce onier the witch's bedroom. 
nghr. The witch's magic won't 
Goblet - Bounce into the roof move, allowing you to gel a lock 
and go down and down again, of her hair, but it still lolls if 
Bounce left, dropping from a touched. Now just gel to the top 
window and then bounce tight, of the building to get the spe- 
Go through the skeleton and llbook and then down to the 
bounce high and right until yon cauldron 



A great tip for all owners of the 

Firebird game on disk- It comes 

from J McGuiness of StocksJield 

and does some very weiTd 

things Here's what you do; 

), Start game and go to the 

load/save game screen. 

i. Select the option 'load new 

command er'. 

3. Input commander's name as 

"Elite" and pi ess Enter 

4 The message 'disk loading 



error' will appear. 

5. Press '4' to exit the screen. 

6. Press Space lo begin game 
and you are in for a big 
surprise. 

Apart from giving you all sorts 
ol things you don't normally 
have, this also seems to intro- 
duce some interesting bugs into 
the game, So play around with it 
and see what happens. 




Rhys Jones from Peter- 
borough ha* some thorough 
tips to hs-tp yon gel through 
the PSS game, including a 
poke foi creating a super- 
character. There's also a map 
from Tobias Mills of Acemb 
showing all four of the game 
zones. 



chest 



door 

gateway to 
another zone 

Mapped by 
Tobias Mills 



I . Before trying to name your 
character press Capslock, as 
only capital letters are allowed. 
3, The masters possess the fol- 
lowing skills and results when 
you study with them. 




Turbo Esprit 

Some quickie tips from Wayne 
Harrigan of Bexleyheath on 
drug- ring busting 

1. Avoid chasing the red cars 
(armoured cars} near the end of 
the game, because they lead 
you on a little mystery tour 
duo ugh ail the back streets and 
barge you imo signs, people 
and lampposts. 

2. Never shoot anything. You 
get many moie points for ramm- 
ing into the back of a car up to 
2.O0G sometimes. 

3. Never choose different towns 
when you start playing. After 
using the same town a few times 
you become used to it and 
eventually know it by heart. 

4. Always go fast, only stowing 
for tumoffs, 



Poke n 



This is the section where w 
explain how to input the ma jo 
iry of Ckett! Mode pokes, Thej 
are two different methods - tr 
instructions for each poke tc 
you which one to use. If ye 
have a 664 or 6138, you'U hav 
to type I tape before usui 
either. 

Method 1: Make sure th 
you've rewound the game tap 
to the beginning. Now type : 
the poke lusting Then type Rtf! 
and press the 'Enter' key. (Dor 
use the key marked 'CTRL' c 
CONTROL', that will stop th 
poke from working.) Press tf 
PLAY key on the cassette dec 
and hit any key on the ma: 
keyboard - the space bar w. 
do nicely. The tape should no 
start to play through in tfc 
norma] way, 

Method Zx Pox this metho; 
you have to skip the first bit t 
ihe game program, To do th* 
start by rewinding the garr 



76 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 aii ih C p^», 



CHEAT MODE 






Yama 
Bog 
Scrag 
Oral 

JvaVestori 

Villa 

Jack 

Grieves 

lscarth 

Verna 

Merlock 

Hiibris 



Seciet of death 
Way of the Sword 
Way of the spear 
Way of the staff 
Secret of strength 
Way of the thief 
Agility 

Secret o( etiquette 
Way of the fist 
Secret of taking blows 
Way of ihe magician 
Improve instincts 



Use once on] y 

1 to ptktU with weapon 

lie skill with weapon 

1 to dull with weapon 

2 to strength 

1 to thieving skills 

3 to ugility 
Use once only 

l to skill without weapon 
t to ability to take blows 
V to magic skills 
1 to thieving ak^lie 
zone 3 



3- Ut ih* armoury always buy 
the cheapest things brat. You 
can buy anything aa long a* you 
have at least one dragon * tooth. 
In other Words even a you only 
have one tooth left you can still 
buy the armour* 



Staff 
Shield 

Armour 
Sword 

Spear 



if. 
IS 
40 
SO 
9 



Hftlrnel ■ 
Gold 
Wine 
Pie 



7 

20 

S 

e 




p 1 




1 §1 




— ZC*Jtj 






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torus 4 



S-'JUW lOX' *N£ 




thods 

:* to the beginning. Now type 
the listing. Then type CAT, 
A press the Enter 1 key. Start 
I tape by pressing PLAY and 
;mq a key, and then watch the 
oon. 

After a little while you'll get 

message "Found 

.'rTHiNG block i". it thwart 

mar what the SOMETHING ac- 
illy is this will vary from one 
me to another . If the instrue- 
■ns with the poke just tell you 
skip the first block you should 
jp the tape here. If Ihe instruc- 
:.ns tell you to skip several 
.ngs, stop the tape when the 
ound' message comes up for 
c last thing you're trying to 
ap. 

Once you've stopped the 
pe press the ESC key. type 
"N, and press the 'Enter' key. 
:.w press PLAY on the tape 
ck, and hit a key on the key- 
-ud to start the tape running. 



[«* 



mm m sorcery 

Ifl H03E 2 

21 H£H9RY BIltEfl-lJ 

30 FOR tsHlFIEMM TD HlflErM? 

40 READ i 

51 POKE i f i 

6i NEXT 

79 PRINT 'insert tape to lea 

d saved eate then press any 

key.' 

3* WHILE INKE¥*=":N£NB 

91 CALL HlltEIHI 

1H PRINTrPRUT "Current imi 

c i& "i 

lid FOR t =39321 TO 39835 

171 PRINT CHIWFEftft) AM * 

ffjj 

130 IF PEEK(t)}lH THE* t=39 

835 

141 NEIT 



151 PAINT 

143 PRINT 

171 INPUT 'Input the Ml MR 

e *;a* 

IBB IF LENdtMU Eft LEN(if) 

1 1 THEN 281 

190 a<=ifPPER*tai:- 

20* at=LEFTt(a1,LeHUt)-U+C 

Hftf(&8f4A5C<R;fMf<at.m> 

210 FOR IM ID LEH(al) 

221 POKE 3*&lfn,ftSCfntW(il 

|t,l»» 

230 NEXT 

211 PRINT 

250 POKE 39735,210 
260 POKE 3*784,210 - 
270 POKE 39797,210 
280 POKE 35303,2(0 
291 POKE 39784,201 



4, To we if an item is magical, 
hold it and then use the crown of 
magic detection. 

5, There are lota at different 
potions but H you $vcr get 
poisoned use thft peppermint 
potion as b cure. 

6, There ar* two ways to deal 
with pits: you can go around 
them or jump them. A* agihty 
goes up you can jump further. 
When in the 3Wte you can. leap 
whole corridors. 

I. As thievwg skill goes- up you 
can dioarm and pick locks more 
easily- Smashing chests de- 
crewes your thieving skills fctjt 
increases your strength. 
9. The magic numbers have the 
following meanings, reading 
top to bottom, the left f column 
first: don't know, fighting skill 
with weapon, thieving skill, 
magic skill, unarmed- combat 
skilly strength, don't know, don't 
know, ability to take blows, 
agility. 

To oae the poke you first 
need to save your character 
from the game then type in the 
poke and run it This will 
prompt you to toad the saved 
character , You can then change 
his name if required fl«*t hit 
Enter if you don't warn to 
change), You'll then be 
prompted to save the character 
• back: <!!ttib tape. This new char- 
acter can man be used as .any 
other saved game to4oad back 
iaso Sword* and Starauy, 



310 POKE 39791,208 

311 POKE 39798,2ft 
320 POKE 39347,200 
331 POKE 39814,200 

340 POKE 39796,208 

35* PRINT "New value* have be 
en poked.' 

341 PRINT 

57? PUKE HTHEftMfl,lSB 

381 PRINT Insert tape to sav 

e net* character on, then pre 

ss any key." 

391 WILE IHKEYM'MOIJ 

48B CALL HJlCK+1 

418 END 

421 DATA 33,171,133,17,103,1 

fl, 62,22,215,16!, 188,201 



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^ Ia « fi ti 6p ^i AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 21 




Based on Judo, UCHI-MATA, is probably 
the most advanced and challenging 
martial arts simulation to date- 

AM the skiffs n' spiffs - without the bruises! H 7 



ComrrwoVxe 64-1 33 C^swrtc f-9 95 

DKctlQ vb 

Spectrum 48 1W Cassette £8*5 



AmiUdd 4A4 664 A ISA 
Cassette £9 .95 P v: £1 395 
MSx Cassette £9.95 




'echr.t ai tonyjK^'t, Euan Jacks, 
comptetng o successful UCH- 
MAD\ one of Eh* many excftiriq 

ttwtivifii riLUF|Xjrd ( .Cd ifi tne game 



Bran Ja<l« received tin black belt, 
1st Dan, ¥¥tntn only 15, He is now 
e 7th Oan, an elite woHd group. 
Havwig won the 6riti , sh 

Chdrnpion*,hip eleven UMii-y. the 
Open Ctvimpinircshp five times, the 
European Championship four 
time; and an Olympic Meoal, he is 
one of the most knowledgeable 

and tere moit exponents of Judo 

in the world. 



Ma/lech H the fegffitered ddde mark of Sattwar* ComrmirsfHticim limited, 

Martech Hotisc, fey "feprgrf?, PicwenKcy D^V, £*>t Sussex BNii* 6EE 

TRAfli tHQUIRIES WELCOME. PHOHE: (0323 i 76H45A TELEX; S7S373 Martec G 



£ix^rju 



There was a good response to 
the challenge to produce joy- 
stick control on the Master- 
tronic dual-play ei game. The 
best ot the bunch were by Phil 
Howard of Mapperley and 
Timothy Lunws of Sander- 
stt-dd. Phil's allows you direc- 
tional joystick control la a 
one-player game and acti- 
vates the armour thai didn't 
work in the original game. 
Timothy's allow* single- or 
dual-joystick control, 

although the second joystick 
may not work exactly as 
planned with all dual-Joystick 
connectors. If the second 
player would prefer the 
original keys or you don't 
have a second Joystick then 
just delete lines 1 10-140 before 
using the poke-- Both pokes 
are entered using Method 1. 
Phil's is printed drat. 



ST5f?ff ONE 



CHEAT MODE 



,ftf v «f f 32 f $l 

li 3ATA 0A T ; 3 , ie, Cd , e5 , >6 , c9 

,cMc,H,?J 

SB mti 3o,3i,cd,24 1 bb,F5 < cU 

,i7,t4,e6,Bfi 

SB &ArA f l f 47, 2 

,l8,cb,5?,2K 

ofl 5-TA Bb,ca,4VMMfci 5e 

P 2B f ll 1 eT 1 3c 

U 1AM %,&,. 

,3e,32,5B,B3 

?hTA c?,io,l 
,77,be,2i,7e 
93 DATA Sl,cd,S 
,21,51,88,22 
1«S DATA dt,er,2l ( be,aa,;i' r * 

110 BATA cd ! «« } 2},cd 1 «5 f 22,c 

lit] v=3:R£fiD.R? i30BB 



1 3 &ATA B8,3a,j5,57,?3 T *5,28 1 3* FOR 1*131 TO K7:ft£M a* 



1 34,Ct!,v3 l & 



M0 a-t'AH*fc»H*JsrliK *,a 



a DhT* rf,3*,5B,lB,b7.c*,5a I5B y^Titfattl 



141 If yOHCSI THEN PRINT 
Data error "SHU 

m LOAJ-oes'.K^a 
136 LAW* J'^yjM sL0« 

i« CALL i*E 

|Tfl8B THG 

18 BflTrt 2K8cr,bS,:i,48,e8,3( 

28 DATA ctf r 3t f t>r,2a,6f,aa,fr(f 

,5b 

38 DATA 9F,b3 l 3e,Ii 1 c{t,al,bc 

,?* 

46 mt& oF t aa 1 ei t ea,0o,« i f,:: 

58 DATA a* t 3a t ?M3,feiH,21 
i IB 

* v w 

t M 

79 DATA 0B,e?,3e,4e,77,BI,P* 

.Bo- 
ss DATA B? i ;.p 1 48 t 77,ai ( 04,flB 



,3? 

9! DATA Si,**, 77,11 i*MMf 
ill 

169 DATA 4b, 
e, 15,77 
II MM 21,57, il,3t,$MM 

28 DATA iMB.M.Se.MJT.iJ 
U 

se &ArAa« T B? l 3f l 32 T 77 t ei ) B 

4,1 

4* MTA W ( 3*,33,77 
58 DATA e3,7D s il,end 
ofl flENORV JrHFF 
7fl FOP aWAAs* TO MA6E:ffE 
AD b*:IF bS- H end* THEM ]9B 
38 PutE iX,VfiLri'+b*]:NEIT 
W POKE tft46f,&7flfm SflA7 

a,i 

2J8 LOAD *' tie*% &35C! 
21B LOftS •!* f «|7l 
220 LOAD "'".fcSSBB 
» CALL MAM 



Craig* has responded t. 
challenge with a comprehens- 
ive playing guide to the CRlt 
space game. The guide will 
be of most use to somebody 
Jnat starting oat with th*.- 
game bat even experienced 
player* may pick up a hint or 
two. 

Starting up The first thing 
to do is define Lhe key* you 
want, Hememjoer that the con- 
trols are not saved when ywu 
save a game, so every lime you 
load up you must redefine (he 
keys. It's a good idea to . fly 
around for a bit getting used to 
the controls and to familiarize 
yourself with the display panel. 
The one thing to ignore here is 
height, which is of no 
importance. 

The first thing to do at 
Reema, your starting point, is to 
find the library and reactor sub- 
station, You slart near the town 
but the automatic direction fin- 
der will guide yon back to the 
cenlre if you stray. The subst- 
ation will contain one or more 
control rods and the library a 
nmevault. 

Docking: This is very 
simple and nowhere near as 
hard as in Ore. There are six 
kinds of building you can dock 
with: two types of reactor, two 
types of supply station , libraries 
and the Under. Head towards 
lhe building, gradually slowing. 
A blue rectangle should appear 
and start to fill the viewscreen. 



---apeed and you'll 
soon dock. Irs important to re- 
member that if fJMp hit a build- 
ing with lasers or Vmissiic you 
won't be allowed tdngck with it 
unless you reload a 
or Start again. 

Supply centres: 
two types, military t 
All (Owns have one of _ 
once docked with you can ac- 
cess the Equip function to use 
them. A menu with six options 
will appear. The refuel, repair 
and install-uares options can be 
used at either centre, while the 
missiles and anti-missile mis- 
siles can be installed only at the 
military centre. The repair sy- 
stem will recharge the shields 
and repair any systems 
damaged in combat. 

Libraries: You'll fund one of 
these in every town, usually 
near both the centre and a reac- 
tor substation They look like a 
civilian supply centre with a 
diamond on top. Once docked 
the command 'LI.' will take you 
lo a menu screen. The data 
banks allow you access to in- 
formation under many headings 
(experiment to sec which ones), 
but much of it isn't very 
relevant. 

The city map allows you to 
examine detailed maps ot the 
city you are in. its outpost and 
the neighbouring cities. These 
:;how the positions of buildings 
<ind enemies but is nol updated 
when they are destroyed. The 



i map gives information 
about the defence levels of dif- 
ferent towns and their jump 
pads to other towns., The identif- 
ication chart shows what the 
buildings and ships look tike on 
screen and gives information on 
their defences and weapons. 

Timsvanlts: These are 
found in Libraries and provide 
useful equipment. You're told 
on docking whether there is one 
present and can access it by 
typing rirnevauJt'. Eight rectan- 
gles in a circle will appear with 
another rectangle in the middle 
Put the cursor over the centre 
one and press fire, A pattern 
will form in Lhe outer rectan- 
gles. Put the cursor over one 
rectangle, remembering where 
it is, and press fire. If you've 
chosen correctly a rectangle al 
the top of the screen will light 
up; if not the pattern will disap- 
pear and you'll have to*atari all 
over again. If you get the right 
rectangle the pattern will reap- 
pear and you must hit the same 
one as before in relation to the 
others * 

There are six objects to be 
found in the vaults, each one 
serving a purpose. A radiation 
suit slows the rale at which the 
the radiation, affects you in the 
main reactor- Reserve shields 
come into operation when 
normal shield strength reaches 
zero. Experimental missiles de- 
stroy everything in a city except 
jump pads and buildings you 
can dock with. A single jump 



unit allows you to jump to s 
city's outpost. AH of these have 
substations but not supply cen- 
tres, and they're often heavily 
guarded. The energy recharge 
unit speeds up the recharging 
of the shield. Durium crystals 
can explode when launching, 
destroying or damaging the 
ship, 

Reactors: You must dock 
with all. of these to see if they 
contain control rods. These 
come in t*o halves which have 
to be fitted together on a screen 
accessed by using the 'rod' 
command- This section lb very 
similar to the puzzlb-solving in 
Impossible Mission and you 
should have no problem with 
the controls. 

In the mam reactor you 
have To take the whole rod* you 
have formed and drop them into 
the circles in the reactor core, 
which will light up. This has to 
be done quickly because of the 
dangerous radiation and heat 
levels. 

Combat This is faMy 
straightforward but there are 
some general rips. Use missiles 
"when possible since your lasers 
otp>rheat easily. Change view* 
rather than turning lhe ship to 
get at enemies who attack you 
when not in sight. Destroy radar 
towers lo slop them sending 
more ships after you. When 
fighting at night don't use in- 
frared while shooting a moving 
object but put up a flare so you 
can target on it more easily. 



t^iyamcyw™*.. AMSTR AD ACTION NOVEMBER 1886 79 



CHEAT MODE 



Tips for the helicopter simul- 
ation tome from Clifford Jot- 
lifle of Northfleet. 

The secret code for the 
helicopter section is WREN, Al 
the start of the game you are 
flying forwards at 45 degrees. 
Pull down on (he joystick so you 
fly backwards at 45 degrees. 
Move the stick to the right till it 
gets to bearing 000 degrees. Fly 
lo the map numbered 11. Look 
along the white line on the de- 
tailed map and you should see a 
red square. Land here and get 
iht? machinegun, 

Take ou and go to any other 
red squares on the map, getting 
all the equipment. There are 
two people on this map; get 
Berne Fly at bearing 190 until 
you gel lo map 10. Collect 
equipment from red squares. 
Fly at bearing 270 to the allied 
camp on map 10. Land on the 
ied rectangle and you'll be told 
the location of the convent. 

Pick up Mary and fly to any 
red squares on this sector, stoc- 
king up on fuel found around 



the camp. Now fly to the? conv- 
ent. You'll probably be attacked 
by two planes. Shoot one down 
and you'll probably be left with 
one on your tail. Slow down and 
fly backwards and you should 
fitid it m your sights. On the 
same map as the conveni is 
Smithy; pick him up and drop 
Mary, Once at the convent you'll 
be (old (he location of the sound 
weapon. 

Fuel - is shown as red dots 
and when picked up will go 
either straight into the fuel tank 
or into the equipment list. You 
need to land to top up the tank 
with fuel you're carrying. 

Maehinegun to use the 
gun you need ammo and Bertie. 

Repairs - you need Smithy 
aboard to repair damage, He 
can do this only on the ground 
At the main locations. 



Attention, cheats! 

These pages are all about cheat- 
ing at games, but some of you 
are taking things; a little far and 
copying pokes out of other 
magazines. We get enough 
high-quality pokes without hav- 
ing to resort to such tactics. So 
please don't send them in 

The pokes printed are 



copyright and can'i be used 
without the permission of the 
magazine that first printed them. 
The same goes for anything that 
appears here in Cheat Mode, so 
don't bother sending our pokes 
to anyone else because lliey will 
be bound by the same 
constraints 





-OS***** 6 



Tips for the mechanical 

dinosaurs come from Owen Hib- 

bert of Gosport. 

1. Every red Zoid you destroy 

has spare power cells if you 

scan where it was before you 

destroyed it - not just 

Slitherzoids. 

Z. City domes, mines and 

beacons ail leave power cells 

when destroyed. 

3, If having difficulty destroying 

domes, move your sights to the 

very edge of a dome and the 

mountains will be less difficult to 



get past- 

4. Nearly all parts of Zoidzilla 
are found in domes near or nan 
to the power station. 

5. U a oty network has only a 
couple of Zosds in it then the 
chances are there is no piece of 
Zoidzilla. All pieces are heavily 
guarded. generally with. 
Spinebacks. 

6. In one network there are two 
Hell runners going around tog- 
ether. Try to avoid these 
because if you destroy one the 
other will become a Spineback 



Level 3: At the end of level 
three, use up your remaining 
missiles as you approach the 
bridge, because when the gy- 
rocopters start lo appear a com- 
mandant will also appear and 
can be relieved of four missiles. 
Four copters will appear, plus a 
few troops which make life 
more hazardous. 

To clear the copters you 
need to do a lot of jumping over 
the grenades they throw. When 
you are at one end of the screen 
and a copter is descending at 
the other, let fly a missile. Try 
not to use up the missiles when 
with the copiers as only two or 
three commandants come on 
screen- 
Level 4: This las! stage is 
definitely the hardest of the lot- 
Lots of karate troops appear 
and also quite a few cannon. 
Climb the first ladder you come 
to at the hangars. If your timing 
is just right, jump, and you will 
land on the next platform. Cont- 



80 NOVEMBER 1986 AMSTRAD ACTION t™*g«™. 



The** tip* from Mark Pin- 
beiro of Tooting Bee take Up 
where the qbcb In i»oe 12 left 
off, tackling the end of level 3. 
They're followed by two 
pokes entered using Method 
1. The first is from Richard 
Bodges of Burnet, giving com- 
plete invulnerability; the sec- 
ond it from Phil Howard of 
Mapperiav, giving infinite 
lives and flamethrower*. 



e 



Note: tape users on the 664 and 
6128 will need to change 02,b8 
in line 40 to lf.bl; in line 60 
ea^bl to eS,b7. and also in line 
SOdSJsltodfl.bJ. 



inue doing this until you reach 
the end of the hangars; it is 
impossible lor the troops to con- 
tinue following you, 

When you stab a command- 
ant you get grenades. Fling one 
of these and everyone but you 
on the screen will die. When the 
screen stops scrolling at the end 
of the level and the siren goer 
four times, run to the left side of 

9REE-N BERET OWE 

IB DATA 3t,*T,32 f tf,24,cS,37 
l W,2l f 3i,42 

26 GAT A 36,59,23, Ji,r7i Hi « 

,4B,iMB,I0 

36 SftTA ft ^cBi^.tS, 21,48 

t M.e5 t 2l,M 

4« DATA t»tt, r5, 21 , f c, 01 , e5, 21 

,{7,b8,f5,2i 

SB DATA bb, 12, e5 f f],2i ,«,!>: 

p ll,^,frl,f3 

hi DATA c9 

it LOW"* - 
» CfliL 43A6A 

Hi m r-mu TO 48E37 

126 REM al 

130 ME ^VALCi'taN 

J 40 NOT 

150 CALL Um 



igol 
left. I 



the screen as tar as you can 
and and lie down facing 
Stab continuously and you win 
kill the man with (he flamethr- 
ower before; he even enters the 
screen. Don't stand up and you 
will see his Game pass over 
your head after you've killed 
him That should be the only 
person you have to kill, 

A very bloodthirsty game. 

IB MTA 3e,b7,32,c9, 11,32,17 

,25,c3,8B.4B 

28 DATA 21,17,22 1 S6,»7,21,«* 

,28,11,41,11 

38 DATA iI j fc,fl,#d,b£,2r,4B 

t 88,e5,2l,88 

40 PA FA bb,«5,2i.fc,ai,e5,21 

,87,tt8 t eS,2i 

58 DATA bb,*2 t rt,fl,2l,ea 1 M 

,ii ( dVl,fS 
68 DATA rt 

7B hflBMfT %im 

38 FOR n-ltm m tBE57 

ft PEAS a! 

IBB POKE ^MLt'l'+att 

118 NET 

928 im** 

131 CALL t3A»A 

m L0A»V,«»4B 
158 CALL Bltl 



I 
I 



hi 




— IB- 


f It % 


,y 


. A 


£r 


LiiW.^^ 


?/ 


w m ^^ 


1> *v 


3s* ^ 



X 



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for the de 



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<n 



C0OWE5 VIDEOS? 



1 






•71 



< r 




i 






* 



I 




/ 




From the* 

RICHARD DONNER 
Production 



Based on the Story 

by 
STEVEN SPEILBERG 







Exciting Multiscreen Action and Adventure! 

us. Gold Limited, Unit 10, The Parkwav Industrial Centre, Heneage Street, 
Birmingham B7 4LY. Telephone 021-559 5020. Telex: 357268 




tiae»otT>istr*gLi.-:(<re;jsn]Mrnanei reason nc 

The CC-S^i (* is a [.-MSTOf n d ' Viarn** 1 6'cl. Int 

: rM5 Wj'Fidr irojtSnc. ftlfnodt5 rEurwo/. 

. Wamer-Tam'-iare PuEWsnir-a Cdyj am Reilfa M J!K Ccru 

AU'loMsresie^'EtS LH«I By p*f nwssfn -^iDiT.wafflric 







CHEAT MODE 





We were flooded with pokes 
for the Elite game. Unfortu- 
nately many of you didn't 
work them out yourselves but 
merely copied them from 
another source. Needless to 
say such scurrilous entries 
wfte immediately binned, 
leaving the real class to show 
through. The poke we're 
printing is a compilation of 
ploys received from Robert 
Brooks of Yeovil, Tim Coup? 
of Derby and Tony Hoyle of St 
Annas, 

The poke is entered using 
Method 1, and lines 30-80 con- 
tain many different pokes, If you 
don't want a particular one then 
just delete that line. Line 20 
gives infinite lives, 30 Takes you 
to the next level if you die, 40 
slows the whole game down, SO 
gives invulnerability to every- 
thing but water. 60 changes 
level when you press Escape, 
70 makes zombies appear more 
quickly, SO apparendy affects 
the music (hard to tell if that one 
works). 

if you don't want to use the 
pokes then try out the following 
tips from Mamood Sultan of 



Wamdon. 

Level 1: Keep moving right 
and jumping over the grave- 
atones, making sure you fire at 
the zombies which appear. 
Jump up and shoot the killer 
bird and climb the first ladder 
without scrolling the screen, 
shooting the plant as soon as 
you get to the top. Kill the next 
bird and plant and jump off the 
end of the hill firing so aa to hit 
the oncoming bird. 

Having crossed the water 
on the raft dodge the flying 
knights by running under them, 
Shoot the flying demon as 
quickly as possible; four hits 
will kill him. The ghosts are 
fairly easy but watch out for 
their spear* and the killer plant 
that appears. The ogre at the 
end of the level has to be hit 
seven times, so stand well back 
and keep firing as he leaps up 
and down. 

level Z- Jump as high as 
possible straightaway and fire; 
this will destroy the plant. But 
watch out for the rock it will 
have thrown. Get to where the 
plant was, dodging gremlins all 
the while, and jump across and 



up where you can gel the next 
plant. Keep moving right and 
shoot the last plant, than jump 
off the furthest platform to enter 
the town. 

Gremlins and crows are 
everywhere so you need to be 
extra careful. When you get to 
the big house with five floors, 
shoot the goblins on the !:rs: 
four levels (each one eight 
times, watching for the flying 
hammers when they die). Move 
to the right of the founh Door 
and go down. Once out of the 
house, prepare for flocks of 
birds. 

On the lifts jump Off One 
only when the next one is below 
you. When you reach land 
again, keep your distance from 
the two ogres and fire as rapid- 
ly as possible to kill them both. 

Level 3: This level involves 
speed and a fast trigger finger. 
First you must shoot the bats 
and then climb the hill, shooting 
the rook monsters eight times to 
destroy them, avoiding the 
rocks they spit. Once you reach 
the stone part of the cave the 
monsters go wild: four demons, 
rock monsters, bats and flying 
ghosts. Keep going. Climb the 
first ladders you come to and 
shoot everything you can. 

Eventually you come to the 
edge of the top platform and 



must jump off, falling several 
screens. Move right to the guar- 
dian - a flying serpent. He has to 
be shot IS times in the scgrr.onls 
of his body and four times in the 
head to kill him. After that it's 
back to where you started. 



How to win an 
ENTIRE ISSUE'S Rave 
software! 



If you WAnt to win an fniire 
issue's rave software, including 
the Mastergame, then all you 
have to do is product an rxcell- 
em map, poke or playing tips. 
We've set you a number of chal- 
lenges but if you can produce 
something ovon better then feci 
free you'll have just as much 
chance of winning a prize 

The bosi solution will win « 
ropy [>f rvn'iy Reive and the 
Ma si organic from 'he issue in 
which the solution is pi in tod. 
The number of games wiSl vary 
of course, bui in pasi issues 
there have been six Raves or 
more that's over £50 of soil 
ware and some months it may 
top £100 The prises will usually 
be oji <assr!!a, unless you re 
quosT disk software ol tti*> 
equivalent ValiiO. We disc give 
out live i unnets up prizes every 
month of one of rhe 
Raves/Mastetgame in (hat w-sue 




eery. Hope you enjoy the ftoft- 
waie. Rhys, 

The runners-up are: David 
Gfrman for his comprehensive 
Speed Kmg hack, AlisUir 
Graham for his Taa Ceti rips, 
Phil Howard for his Green 
Beret and Storm pokes, Tim- 
othy Lomas. for his Storm poke 
and Allan Trotman for his 
Cauldron //playing lips. 

If you aspire to The heights 
of these worthy winners then 
get cracking on this month's 
challenges'. 

1. A map of N*xor. 

2. A poke to make character* 
more friendly in Doomdnk's 
Revenge. 

3. A bomb-disposal poke for 
Spit f F crsffjiaiitirs. 

A. A playing guide or tip* for 
Fourth Protocol* 
5. A poke to make objects 
visible in Qabbalah- 



Deciding the puze winners was 
very tough this month. But jusl 
sneaking ahead of the pack was 
Rhys Jones for his playing tips 
and poke (or Swords and Sor- 



WSSSSSm . 



Peter Williams from Cambridge 
writes with help for frustrated 
owners of the disk version of the 
game. He's altered the poke for 
the tape game to work with the 
disk version h and here it is. Just 
type in die listing, save it onto 
the game disk and run it to load 
the game with 255 lives. 



151 UHHILAI) 



. L 

5CH 



iflffiV &5BFF:LuArceil ! 



,21 FOR a=tfHe TO HU2?fiEflil 

a: POKE a,fe:NEZT 

3S POKE &5C33,*CSsPffl££ i5C34 

,H:FCKE ttC3$,W 

;t CALL S5Ci» 
|58 MTA 205|l22,lv8,]7S.33,l 

52,19^54.92 



Richard Hodge* from Barnei has 
a poke for the ageing US Cold 
game that gives infinite ships on 
&• air and sea stage* of the 
game. It means that as long as 
you don't take the secret pet- 
sag* you'Q always have a full 
complement of tank*. It's en- 
tered using Method 1 . Note: B84 
and 6133 tape users should 
change MJ** in line 40 to lt>l; 
in line SO, aa,bl to e£»b?, and in 
line SO dB f bI to d<Ms7 



\i im 5e, [9,32^2,79,03,31 
,62,21,31,22 

20 DATA 3&, 19,23, 3M7,21,« 

,21,11,41,11 

39 DATA »l,44,B2,ed,b B ,2:.tt 



.flfl t eS,21,W 

40 DATA W,e5 t 2l,*M2,e5 

.87^*5,21 

,Ji,Ji^ol,f3 

■r mm mm 

it LOW 

M CALL 13A6A 

100 LOAF 1 *,* 28 * 9 

til FOR «=&KM TO BE37 

128 READ at 

13€ mt KjVJtLi'l'+.rt) 

148 KEJT 

m *m e 
ibi call ibm 



,21 



82 NOVEMBER 1986 AMSTRAD ACTION radabRHbaaww 







AVAILABLE NOW FROM VIRGIN GAMES ON SPECTRUM 48/128, 

COMMODORE 64/128 AND AMSTRAD CPC RANGE OF COMPUTERS 

£9.95 ON CASSETTE AND £14.95 AMSTRAD DISC 



PLEASE SEND ME DAN DARE - PILOT OF THE FUTURE IMMEDIATELY! 
SPECTRUM 48/12B CASSETTE £9.95 □ COMMODORE 64/128 CASSETTE £9.95 D 
AM STRAD CPC CASSETTE £9.95 U AMSTRAD CPC DISC £14,95 D 

Name .,,,,.,.. 

Address 



i n m i ♦ i --- _._.. 



Please make cheques or postal orders to Virgin Games Ltd. Please do not post cash. 
VIRGIN GAMES LTD, 2/4 VERNON YARD. PORTOBELLO ROAD, LONDON W11 2DX 



A Right Royal Joystick 




MICROSWITCH JOYSTICK 



^METAL SHAFT 
0AUTO FIRE 

^12 MONTH WARRANTY 

• Deluxe, robust construction. •Comfortable rugged 
hand-grip, Bdirectionat control with automatic centering, 

• Heavy duty base with strong stabilizing suction cups. 

• Highly sensitive light touch MICRO SWITCH fire buttons. 

• Economically designed control handle with indestructable 

METAL SHAFT • Built in AUTO FIRE function. 

Maeh I Joystick compatible with:* Sinclair 7X Spectrum ibk ahk.vshk 

• Amstrad computers • Commodore 64 & VIC 20 Computers 

• Commodore CI 6 & Plus 4 Computers (adaptor sold separately) 

• MSX Computers • Atari 2600 & Alari 5200 Video Game Systems 

• Atari Home Computers 

Pfrittf mcludt VAT, Damage A o»(krf>4 OtUtn'f unimaiiy i*a«t* E l P*" f P'«*r ■ *t no am f* co n - 0»inr enquiries w*lcam« 

Cni*tihpfoauieiSiM<li6l» (rem ftrjn C lie*»f tHxfMl» WH5MITH ■> Hi-gn S1 . S-tOf*[ 

JH^ und III quo d c m puU r ihou i 





^5f 



Mar/cef/ng Jfg^ 





CHEETAH MARKETING LTD 

I WlLLOWBROOK SCIENCE PARK 

CRICKHOWELL POaD.ST ME LIONS. CARDIFF 

TEL CARDIFF :02221 777337 T6LE3C 497J55 

fAX 0322 77940 J 



ourAMDRUM! 




SOIG'i TALLY RECORDED HEAL DRUM SOUNDS 
SIMPLE TO USE -UP AND RUNNING IN ONLY MINUTES 
A TRUE DIGITAL DRUM MACHINE 
REALTIME OP. ON SCREEN PROGRAMMING 
COMPLETE WITH SOFTWARE 
EXTRA SOUNDS CAN BE LOADED FROM TAPE 
COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL 

THE MOST EXCITING PERIPHERAL EVER DEVELOPED 
DYNAMIC FILING SYSTEM — STORE OVER 1000 
PROGRAMMED 
RHYTHMS 

TAPE SVNC 
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POLYPHONIC 

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* JUST PLUGS 
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.><:..rt>*lLL l&A v^y.C^^i.tt"' 

II s -**o*«:MinT?njT nkCi *ws 

FAX Q?n rrUlt 




This i& the main 

listing. If you typfl it in 
and run it by itself it will 
amply print out a giant 
poster of the program — - 

'isiTg. since that is 
what's onscreen 



Adding this line 
creates one very 
simple screen dtsplay 
(or turning into a 
poster. You could 
replace It with an/ 
other graph ics routine, 
for example one which 
loads in a screen 
display from a 
graphics package or (it 
you're dever) the tide 
screen of a game. 



{ 



10 MODE 0IFOR i=2 TO 13: 
RAD ACTION": PR I NT"": NEXT 



„ T °«IK 



here's 




POSTER MAKER 

Ingenious program, this, from PETER DOEL. It produces a giant 
printout of whatever you've got on the screen, using eight 
she els of norma] continuous stationery. The printer uses the 
computer's normal character set, so that when you look at the 
printout close up you can barely make out what it is. But slick 
the pages together, walk away 20 feet, then turn round and look 
and... WOW! 

You can change the 'contrast' in your giant picture by 
altering the character s separated by commas in line 240 - each 
of these characters corresponds to one of the 16 possible screen 
colours. 

The program starts at line 100, and ii you just run it as it is, it 
will simply produce a magnified printout of the text that's on the 
screen. A better idea is to add some more program lines below 
line 100 to crests something interesting on screen, even if it's 
just loading in a loading screen from a game. 

100 UIDTH 255 

115 PRINT «8,CHR*f27M "A'iCHR*'7> i 

120 DIM s*U5> 

130 FDR q~0 TO ISSREAU **<q>:NEXT 

140 FOR 1=0 TO 480 STEP 160 

150 FOR y-390 TO STEP -2 

f-^0 FOR k-0 TO 15S STEP 2 

180 a*=a* + s* (TESTU + 

190 ME*T m 

200 PRINT #Sji* 

210 NEXT y 

220 PRINT l»B f CHR*fl2M 

230 ne:t I 

240 PATA 0," ■ r *,0,M > +,%, 










i|************ 
?*** 






wi 



********** ******* IIIi** n 

irtufciiilfllli *********** 



]\ W tl It 



\\ II II 11 u 




3 




** 

A* 

k** 

*** 

*** 

*** 
. * * * * 
***** 
***** 
***** 
***** 
***** 
****** 
****** 

******* 

******* 
******* 

;******' 
(t******' 

******£' 
*******' 

*******' 

.*******' 

******** 

******** 

******* 

******* 

****** 
. * * * * 
s* 




SIMON 

You probably remember the game in which you have to 
remember a sequence of coloured lights and sends and repeat 
it. This is that game. Simple, but challenging and surprisingly 
addictive. 

This program mimics the game very nicely indeed, giving 
you. a choice of two playing speeds. 

So. with your Amstrad you can copy a game that took the 
Christmas market by storm ten years ago at a cost of £20! 

Our thanks to T MAGEE of Marlow, Bucks. 



10 MODE 0*GO5UB 2&&Z LOCATE *0, 1 , 1 : PRINT ** SIMON SAYS #" 

20 CLEAR INPUTILOCATE 1*0, \ , 25: INPUT "FAST -'SLOW (F,'S) • J S* 

30 IF S*='F- THEN S*250 ELSE IF S*-"^" THEN S=500 ELSE 20 

40 &L-3 

50 CLEAR INPUT: DIM ml^h 

60 ' game 

70 GOSUB 260 

SB LOCATE #0,7 9 6:FRINT "L»v*l " j GL-2 

90 LOCATE #0, 2, 24 ; PRINT "< Space > to start.": IF INKEY*^" THEN 90 

100 GOSUB 310:' record ddvk 

110 GOSUB 120: GOTO 170 

120 'display mo/#5 

130 FOR g=l TO gJ 

149 INK ib tg) * 1.0: SOUND l,*fg>*i00 

1 50 GOSUB 430IGQSUB 200 
160 NEKT g: RETURN 
1 70 ' p 1 py#f input 
1S0 FOR g=i TO gl 
190 a=VAL<INKEY*i 
200 TF »<1 OR a >4 THEN 190 
210 IF aOm<gi THEN 350 
220 INK jatgl 1 1,0; SOUND l,m<g)#100 
230 GOSUB 430:GOSUB 280 

340 NEXT gi LOCATE W0, 7 % Si PRINT "CORRECT" : GOSUB 430: GOSUE 230 

230 ERASE m:gJ=gI+l:GOTO 50 

260 'draw screen 

270 MODE 0:GOSUB 2G0iLOCATE #0, 1 ( 1 : PRINT "* SIMON SATS # B :GOTO 290 

280 BORDER 0: INK 0,01 INK 1,26: INK 2,6iINK 3,24: INK 4 t l8:lNK 5, 2: MOVE 0,0,l:RETUR 

N 

290 FOR d = l TO 4: MOVE d*100,250! DHAWR ?5,0.'iRAWR 0, -75;DRAUR -75,0JDRAWR 0,73: MO 

VER 10, -10:FILL d + 1 

300 MOVE d* 100-20, 170! TAG: PRINT d ; ! TAGOFFJ NEX . d 

310 ' record ihdwe 

320 FOR r=l TO gl 

330 m(r)-lNT(RND#4JM 

340 ME'^T r: RETURN 

350 'oopi 

160 LOCATE *0 t 7, S: PRINT 'Oops! *: SOUND 1,1000 

370 FOR N-l TO 1500;NEXT NiLOCATE *0. 6, 8: PRINT "It hs'. ,■ 

380 GOSUB 120 

39B LOCATE #0, 2 , &: PRlNT'Anot h&r gofY/Nl?' 

400 IF INKEYC4310-1 THEN ERASE M : GOTO 10 

410 IF INKEY<4£><>~1 THEN END 

420 OO TO 39 O 

430 'patuse 

440 FOR t=l TO S;NEXT t 

450 RETURN 




o 






•&■*?«* 



►W 




Releasee on November Sth tor the BBC Micro, 
Acom Eiecion. CofTiFnodore W/128 and 
Amstrac 4W 664 4428 compute* 

P3ep»Ofi 3 includes - 

• A Screen Designer - devise your own puzzles for Repton 

TO SOlvft 

■ A Character Designer — alter any or ail of the gome 

• Many New Features - poisonous fungi, time bombs, time 
capsules, golden ercwfl* 

e 14 Fascinating Screen* - a pr m compefHion a being riefd 

lor plovers who complete an of the screens. 
Avoid tne rusti - advance orders being taken now! 




SOffUlftftf 



imneo 



ACORN SftFT 



5*9eTtH«u*4 S*ii>nefiori«, Lspcslctiax reiepriDr»e.05324WASi 




HiAIItM Of f Hi OAWl 



GET It i rt* 
WWDUIY _ 



._j.fli 
j.h 



*aH8JAtK^ - _ — . 



i US 

?.** 

_ J.ii 

795 

., J.»* 

T.U 

.7.94 
_™.7,l4 

W1HTEA GAME4 7*J 

WlKWtt CMCOWrTER 7.11 

Oflf S Jt MfltT J.I* 

TufuoiiFflrr 



WH0»«.tC*WN*f1 
CIMUHSO 

Vie *r«iJw1FU,.„ 
WiCStl 

HOtMCUP 
F *y 3 : 



AMSTRAD 

ROOM Id ~JJ* 

NICK CALDffSOJ>LN _>JB 

KVhG FU HASTE ft 7,H 

CM COMBAT _J,U 

CC*t T,1 1 

««K K WSiFtU T.tS 



W>TCFTHSHOL«L 



_7B! 



V.YISITHBW _.. 

CAULSftOM 11 

BttOL(t.„„. 

CJU'lFlC- - 



AJ£S MQHWAr. 

fWftLIQKT. . 



-7.14 



-7« 



.J.I* 
,.7. IS 

„Z*# 
-.J.lS 

GftAHAM Q.OQCH CFICKiT., 7.M 
ipTTEflHATICWA K*RATE..„*-S» 

MELTDOWN, _____7.t* 

1UX HEAQAOOM 7.0* 

HEAVY OH THE UAQKK .7.*! 

J1 AHOU AKfc™^ — —A I * 
ihOGL'N J.tl 



SABOTEUR. » 7.1 S 

GHSVS'k GQ&U'iS ... nl 

MONOPOLY 7BS 

I0lO» ___ — Ml 

4i*t PMt POKHt r.ii 

MOVIE , f.ll 

■ LADE flUNNCn , J,f( 

■ L&tKSUSTtltS— —. 7.1 1 

qolo run — t.b* 

IMPOSSIBLE Ml CSpH„ ._7.Bi 

NEXUS 7.IJ 

» ITAfitTBf K£ n J -fl* 

tt!JK*i ELEVATOR T.BS 

SQCSSR W 7J9 



S£JV£? FOR LISTS OF NEW RELEASES AND DISK PRICES 




/rinn soft 



m^m 



/GLASGOW G5 8BR / 





WHAT! 



SURELY YOU'RE NOT STILL WAITING 
FOR THAT GAME TO LOAD ? 



ISN'T IT ABOUT TIME YOU BOUGHT YOUR 

SOFTWARE FROM AMBYTE, THE ONLY COMPANY 

WHICH CAN SELL YOU GAMES SOFTWARE ON DISC 

AT CASSETTE PRICES 



3 HERE'S HOW IT WORKst 



From Ihe lisl below you pick the games you wanl, and we put them on disc - easy isn't il? We call them custom 

compilations. The advantages are clear; you benefTl from the loading speed disc games offer, so you gel more out of 

your software, but you don't pay any more than if you were buying In* gam as on tap*. Not only that, many of Ihe games 

wa offer wouldn't be available on disc - where else could you buy a Maslerlronic game lor £1 .99, on disc, if it isn't from 

AMBYTE, 



ACTlVlSiON 



ACOOT 
AC002 
AC003 
AC004 
AC04S 
AC0O6 



Qbostbuslars 
Mind shadow 
Master of Ihe Lamps 
Rescue on Ftadaius 
Hacker 



9.99* 
9.99* 
999* 

9.99* 
999* 



Barry McGuioars Boning 9.9S* 



GFKW1 Thing on A Spring 


8.95 


GR0O2 


Way Of The Ttgw 


9.95 


GR003 


Super Skriilh 


8.95- 


GR004 


Sounder 


8.95 


BfUpG 


Monty on Ihe Run 


8.95* 









ALLH3ATA 



AL001 Who Dares Wms2 8,95 



MASTERTRONIC 



waooi Finder Keepers 1,99 

MA002 Chiller 199 

MA093 NofHeiraquous 1.99 

MACQ4 Locor-clion 1.99 

MA0D5 Soul of a Rstot 1.99 

MAOOS Formula One SmJaior 1.99 

MAO 37 One Man and H is D rod 1.99 

MAOOS Caves ol Doom 1,99 

MA009 IntoOblvfMi ' 99 

MAO 10 Spell Bound 2 39 

MAD 11 the Last V8 2.99 

MA0 12 Kane 1 99 

MA0 13 Ftadzone l <J9 

MAQ14 Five a Side Foolbal 2 99 



KU001 Siar Avenger 

KU002 Gamma 

KUOOJ Rock Raid 

KUG04 Fruily Frank 

KUCOS Caverns of Mars 

KUGDJ ArgcNavis 

K : JC03 Renegade 

K'JCOS Buster Block 

ELMZ Commando 

E1003 Somo Jack 

EL0O«t Ghosts and Goblins 



PALACE 



PA001 
PA002 



Cauldron 
CatiMron II 



1 MIKROGEN 


MKC01 Battle of the P 'an els 


995 


MKC32 Three Weeks in Paradise 


9.95 


MKC33 Heroerte's Dummy Run 


9.95 


MKC34 Equinox 


995 


frp9jzr,mmmi^^^^mm 



US001 Beachhead 2 9 95* 

US502 Irrp-tssbiG Miasioc 9.915* 

US003 Wrrrier Games 9,95 

USOM Return lo Oi 9,95' 

USK5 Bruce Lee 9.95 

USO06 Goonics 9.95" 

USM7 Zonro 9.95" 

JS0C8 Sunlight 95' 

US009 Damouslers 9.95 

USOlO KunoFu 9 95 

U5011 Bounl^ Bob 9.95 

US012 Desert Fax 3.95 




FIRESIRO 



FlMi Rasputin 

FIQ02 Rjnestona 

FI004 Costa Capers 

FcQQS Chiire-a 

FI006 Thundertj rds 

FI007 Wfow Pattern 

FIQ08 Donl Pane 

FI0O9 Subsunff 

FfOlC Shorts Fuse 

FKM1 The Comal Gawe, 

FI012 NTia Master 

FI013 Col'apss 

FI014 Helichopper 

FIO 15 Thrust 

FTQ1G Seabase Delta 

FI0*:7 The W.ld BLnch 

F(0T9 Siar Firebirds 

FI0I9 Ma^ey Headbanger 

FIC20 Spikey Harote 

P5001 Theatre Europe 

PS002 Same for Midway 

PS0C3 Bailie oi Bnfam 

PS004 Swords and Sorcery 



6.95 
5 95 
60S 
695 

€.95 
6.9& 
6.95 
6.95 

8.95 
8.95 

8 95 

8.99 
8.99 

7.95 
7.95 
7.95 
7.95 
3.95 
3.95 
3.95 
1.99 
1.93 
7.9S 
1.99 
1.99 
1,99 
1.99 
-.99 
T 99 
199 
1 99 
1.99 

9.95 

9 95 
9.95 
995 



RTANT 



YOU MAY ORDER AS MAN V GAMES AS YOU UKE SO LONG AS THE 

COMBINED VALUE OF TWO OF THEM EXCEEDS £15. YOU CANNOT. 

FOR EXAMPLE, ORDER SEVEN MASTERTRONIC TITLES UNLESS YOU 

ALSO ORDER TYrO NORMAL PRICED GAMES 



CROC 1 ) Endurance 


795 


CROC? Jugpenau* 


7» 


CROC 3- Formula 1 


795 


CRQ04 Blade Runner 


B95 


1 MAFTECH 



SHiTANNIA SOFTWARE 



---■■. ■ 

COM2 
CC&03 



Play Vour Cards High! 
Am hen 



ELECTRIC DREAMS 



L .f I : :■ 1 

MT0D2 

MTooa 

MT0Q4 
MT005 



Zoids The Battle Beo^s 9.95 E&MI 

Brian Jatts Superstar 9,95 ED002 
GeoJi Capes Strong Man 6 95 

•Jam Hm Sinp Pe**r a.95 MS001 



Winter Sports 
Spindizzy 



MIRRORSOFT 



WAR 



S 95* WS002 



Dynarnile Den 

Bouldii-rdJiri 



795 

995 
995 

':'*."■ 

999" 

ass 

9 95 



ORDERING {CPC 612&654 & 4$4 machines onfy) 

DON'T FORGET YOU MUST SPEND ATLEAST£?50NTWOGAMES- 

Pleasecton'lorderany games ma*ed*ithastar(")unle3Syouhave 

lelephc*»ad us (on the number below) lo make sure they are available 

The se ga me s we re not a^a ilable ai th e i ime cf ou r go: ng io press but 

s^uW fi^ when you read ih s - but don't lake a chance- phone us, 

ol 'ne'wise yc u r order rnig ht get delayed 

You cai order as many games as you i.ke, wse a separate piece ol paper if 

you prefer, but dent forgot any of the dejtaftt ashsrl lor by 1 he lorm 

Phone 0277 229664 



Code Number 



Title 




Total Order Value 



Price 



Name, 



Customer Coda {if you have 
one please use it, il saves time) 




















Address, 



Postcode. 



Cheques ar>d postal ordors shoukf be m^dc payable lo AMBYTE, A I 
orders should be posted to AMBYTE, 200 North Service Rd, 
Brentwood, Essex CM 14 4SG 



88 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 




COMPETITION 



BLASTER 

GHettoblasters, Walkmans, 
watches and t-shirts are all up for 
grabs in our massive Mastertvonic 
competition 

Still wearing flared trousers? Don't know what colour shoelaces 
ase 'in' this year? Does breakdancing simply mean six months 
in a plaster cast? Have your ears never suffered from a rap 
attack? 

Then this competition is specially for you - win one 
of the fabulous prizes on offer and you'll have more 
street cred than a Radio One DJ in a Ferrari. 

Master! ronic is the king of budget software 
Not content with practically giving away their 
games, the nice people there also want to give 
you a whole host of super prizes that will put the 
sparkle back into your image. 

All you have to do is loosen up your fingers and 
brain and produce a worthy work of art. The competition 
is split into two sections, under- 16s and over- 16s, but the 
prizes are the same for both. 

The two winners will get an ear-blasting Sa:3ho Cheltoblda- 
ler complete with radio, cassette deck and detachable twin 
speakers your ears and the neighbourhood won't be the same 
again. 

Two second prises of a Sony Walkman will also bring music 
into your life, while the two third prises of a digital watch will 
mean you're always on time for that speaaj rendezvous. Five 
runners- up in each age group will also get a Mastertromc t-shirt 
and be the coolest-dressed player in the street. 

WHAT YOU HAVE TO DO 

Txie under- 16s can let their imagination run riot because we 
want you to draw the weirdest creature, monster, alien or beast 
that you can think of. You can do it in pen, paint, or anything you 
like even Art Studio. What we'll be looking for won't just be 
artistic skill, but plenty of imagination and humour as well. 

The over-16s can exercise their razor-sharp wits by pro- 
ducing a cartoon about Mastertronic. You can make it about the 
company, a particular game, the new joystick, or anything else 
1o do with budget games - and again we'll be looking for 
humour and imagination as well as good drawing. 

The winners will get an additional bonus: Mastertronic will 
frame the winners' entries and present them with a scroll to 
mark their achievement. With generosity like that what are you 
waiting fort Get diawuig! 

CLOSING DATE 

Entries should be here by Monday 17th November. Use A4-size 
paper or smaller. Post to: Master Blaster competition, 
Am* trad Action, The Old Bain. Somtrlon, Somerset, TA11 
HE 



Everyone! a winner 



AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 



@ 






0/V6 WAY LIFTS. 



TGOO WAY U^TS, 



ll 

1 m 

! M 


^1 — 


j] 


T. 



T G 



l G I T l Gp 



fa o/veu>Av D0O£, 



LGCK6D DOORS. 



DROP 



T*ee/v 



ec/v. 




G T 






mmm 


T gI^G^^T G| 
^ ♦ 1 


m 

G 


£jpfi! 









II 








buy your 

SOFTWARE 

FROM YOUR 



ARMCHAIR! 



— — f ^ i miiiii it ii i hi n 







By the time you've reached this part of the magazine, 
chances are you'd love to get yovr hands on Some of 
the software we've reviewed. And that's just what you 
can da. Our mail order service allows you to order 
virtually ANY piece of software for the Amstrad 
micros reviewed in the magazine* Whet's more you 
can gave yourself a good sum of money on shop 
prices AND qualify for great free gifts. 

Hey, it's a wonderful way to buy yovr software! 



SUPER FREE GIFTS! 

Here's the great range of Software that you can get FREE with your 
order - most of them normally costing over EB, wifeh some worth 
nearly £50? If your tote! order is over £1 & you will receive one free 
title, but if it's over £30 you will receive TWO. Use the order form to 
mark your preferences and to delete any titles you already have, but 
we cannot guarantee which you will receive, &o be prepared for a 
MYSTERY GIFT! 



KUNG FU/HUMSU 1 

Two gjMt Octifi 34mes on one tape, 
as given away with &\<t Ctai&w "S5 
ehhk of AA. U you miuivd il lhc«, you 

irauid gOI it now 

IHEGOVENANr ■ OEMOS 
A full version at ifm AA-Raved PSE 
game on lap*, together *iih dewofl 
of four other PSS mles, and instruc- 
tions for trarsffcrruig 17m? Ccurerianr 
10 disc. As featured on the potet of 
out Mny jsuufr 

CASSETTX ONLY 

Herbert '$ Dua\ my ffl/fl 
fVerya/ie'jfl WsJJjf 

AmejiftMi Football 
Elactta Freddy 
Hunter Kilter 

Laser warp 



SplAl 

Classic Advf-mtite 

Wriggler 

PyjAitiAidJiij 

Spatwerman 

Hunchback 

Master Chess 

Roland goes Digging 

Message from Andromeda 

Space! Hawk 

Winter Games 

Dooir.sd.sy Blo«S 

Get Dexter 

Big League Soceet 

Alex Higgins World Pool 

Marsport 

Aii&n Highway 

Swecvo 's World 

Ttd, 

Highway EncounUn 
Batman 




i VOUCHER 

t»r inrTimsuJirl IromfS B- 
I m*i vm rwtlttl OH »r d»r ! 




VOUCHER 



Fur uh m|»i oriin 1rum El I.M 
F1I.H 





HOW ORDERS ARE DEALT 
WITH 

Amstrad Action Mail Order It run 
h*r« hi Sorftetton bf the snper. 
aiHEient SUE TAYLOR, the woman 
who 50I* more mail In > day than 
moot people 5*t each yeaif 

Utiles* YD"' order includes 
prHfcutii which our suppliers 
cannot <j*t hold of for gemc re- 
ason, Stlt despatches All packages 
by fUwt etnas, mail within two Or 
th»e working days of receiving- 
the orders. Therefore, you can 
jinrmilly expect 19 reeelv* yaur 
partial about a week 10 10 day* 
aft** ordering, 

If it's delayed bay end that 
chuxeta M* yon*v^ ordered * bun 
which hasn't yet been relcafred o* 
in temporarily unavailable. In 
which case a phone call fxem yon 
WONT speed Ihinav up. (la fact 
III* revere* - phone coils are vary 
lime-cons uming.) It a long delay 
were HkeJy w*'d let y on know. 



PLEASE BEAR ihi MIND 

1. The laet that * prOQTara 1* rt- 
newod in the raafuib* dt-*s not 

futulH it* availability tinea 
kottib software it reviewed 
BEFORE it has actually be*n 
released. 

2. We are happy to refund your 
order at any time op to. the de- 
spatch of the good*. Bat be causer of 
the possibility of copying aofl- 
wh»p no refhnd or exchange to in 
alternative piece of Software can 
hw glif 11 after Ihey have b*»D de- 
•patched. Software which doe* not 

lead may he re I timed for a Te- 
placement cassette or disx con- 
taining the um i> software either to 
fU or directly K» the loftware 

hottae concerned 

3. We Dry to be as securjie as we 
can with detail » of put*. nmpiB- 
bllity and die* availability, bat 
cannot accept liability for any 

mm thai creep in. 



Reedert in the Republic of 
IRELAND can order any of these 
good* at the same rates as British 
leader* provided thai payment is 
made in pounds Sterling. If you 
wish to pay in Irian pounds you 
most add a IR3.30 suTchjnj'; IN 
ADDITION to allowing for the 
entrant exchange rale - that's 
what It coals at lo pay in yonr 
cheqnes or postal orders 

Readers eliewheie in 

EUROPE must add £1 per software 
item to She coal of their order. 
Payment must he in pound* 
Sterling, 

Sending torn dTus D3tymer.t 10: A A Malt Order h i a Plnewood Drive, Sejimwlon, Somerset;! All &JP 



MAIL ORDER FORM 






Name..................... Telaphoneno-[if poss). 

Address,....,- ... ............ 



Machine owned: "1 C PC 464 LI C PC 664 L CPC61 26 



.Post cede. 



Erd *r the pragnsms you *tah 



toardtf rt tto igm bafew. t.'n^rfftlCE' you rmJtt *';!*■ lh» Mlntl!! p'«* If yew want mans dufl. fw* hams, 
you s hgvM Sallham en a. secern* pi«* a' paper. 





SOFTWARE TITLE 


SOFTWARE HOUSE DISC/CAS5 


PRICE 


1 








2 








3_ 


- 








4 














PRE-DISCO 


J m TOTAL 





Tk* wi» ol tit* f eaowrq accord*?) to yet* PftEfJKCOU NT TOTAL 

O Undfl'ES 1 £5 3.90. 1 endose a50a discount mucher. [ ] CiO-14 r S9, lendlosea£ J KE&D&untVOiyCfwf. 

O £15-19.39. 1 enclose a C1 v*ouchef3ncclama free gift. r^E2(>20,MJ enclose a Ovctjchef ar-de'aima ffeeg'1. 

] £30-40.99', lenctose a t2 voucher sneciaim twofjifts L JOrtr£S0, I er,close a C5 voucher and claim two gifts 

TOTAL PAYABLE FOR MAILORDER i-PRE-DtSCOUMTTOTALminuSdisoou^ |C 
Aeo Am lau! ia th« uihuii p< T »ol# «n «<y spaut «4f«f i n«sr*4 on reverse side. 



!*"*•*» **« *i» In! tha gvn«* y«j elrsedy hsv*. and are** mt <n«s youKouHpuijaibrly la* si your tr*« Qph(s-). 

Cuneta'Cov*-*-*- D«jv!f» Omni ■ M«f, s . rtsrtyijTJ , Curing Hjl ' t mjrytxw's s WsJf - ATei^^ F« tnd • Rrttfy - H J»4f KJ ^ * L«+>>i-«(» • Sti* 
CfM**f tag ■ CJwk «o»«iUr» ■ Wr.pQ* ■ <\|hwjtiS - Sp»>WnW - WLncrilaad.- Htsw Of»6I ■ fUxn't 3o«! Hg9r 9 .Sndr«nMit, S^sea Ka*k 
WirK»- Oa-rin ■ Dwrrwry AM* ■ Ciai QeHK • suent > Alti rHofl 18* Marsper ■ *J*n Higrwriy ■ SiMtn'i Warlcl > Tt_L ■ H gmray EwSunW ■ Bsfrrtfn 



You've read the reviews - now get your Arnold singing! 

Save £7! 

ADVANCED MUSIC SYSTEM 

This disk could Ik 7011x3 for just £22.95 

Or If you haven't got a disk drive... » 

Save £3.50! ^ 

MUSIC SYSTEM 

On cassette at just £12.45 

Our seven-page special feature shows you what your 
CPC can da in the line of music: now you can put if 
into Action and save yourself pounds with this 
Amstrad Action offer. 

The original Music System caused quite a stir 
when Pete Connor reviewed it in our March issue, 
describing it as 'a superbly executed package ... with a 
thorough and very clear manual'. Since then it has 
become the standard against which all music pack- 
ages have been fudged, and largely found wanting. 
The Advanced Music System extends the facilites still 
further, and 'the main section ... looks every bit as 
good now as it did six months ago 1 . 

The package is very easy to use, with pop-down 
menus and windows. You can create three separate 
voice* at a time- As you play, the tone appears in full 
musical notation on the screen. The Advanced version 
includes a printout module for printing six voices of 
music on proper staves on paper, and a linker module 
that allows larger pieces to be played. 
% We are offering you The Advanced Music System 
on disk far £7 less than you will find it in the shops, 
and if you haven't got a disk drive then wo ore 
knocking £3.50 off the cheaper Music System on 
cassette. If you are planning to buy a disk drive soon, 
then you can still benefit as Rainbird will upgrade you 
to Advanced for El 4. 

Whatever you've got, this is the best way to get 
into music and save money at the same time! 



Save chaos! 

MAGAZINE 

O nly £3.95 

You asked Tor liicm and now you ve ■ 
them No more piles of Amsdad Act* 
cluttering up your living room carpet a 
getting, sob, battered io pieces in the p: 
cew, Instead a superb, custom-built bine 
specially designed to take 12 copies of - 
And preserve ihem in pristine condition 
prosperity (and easy future reference) 



( Save £3! 

] 3D STARSTRIKE II 

Yours for just £6.95 on cassette 

Just a glance at this month's front comer 
shows you how much we rate this game. ft 
offers stunning 3D space combat in a style 
reminiscent of Elite, but dioae vector 
graphics are filled w with glorious colour! 
The aim of the game m to break through the 
enemy's defences, destroy the central re- 
actor, and escape fast But there are a 
variety of planets, each with ever more 
powerful and varied defences, each of 
which have to be destroyed. 

The defence of the galaxy is in your 
hands, At £9-95 this gome merited Master- 
game - at £6,9S it could be yours. 



SPECIAL OFFER FORM 



Fill in your name, address and machine type on Ihe reverse of Ibis form. Then place a tick next to those Jlems 

you wish to order. 



1. NEXUS 128 

□ Just £12.95 on Disc 

2.ADVANCED 
MUSIC SYSTEM 
_ £22.95 on Disc 
3. MUSIC SYSTEM 

□ £12.45 On Cassette 

4.3DStarstrikell 

□ Cass £6.95 

Disc £10,95 



5. Trio 

J £7.95 on Cassette 

□ £12.95 on disk 

6. Powerplay 

D Just £6.95 on Cassette 

7. Magazine binders 

□ £3,95 

8. Subscription 

□ 12 months £16,50 

(UK rates only - write ter quotation 
for overseas rales) 



TOTAL NUMBER OF ITEMS TICKED 



TOTAL AMOUNT PAYABLE ON SPECIAL OFFERS 



9. Back issues 
Numbers £1,35 

□ Number4£1,85 

□ Numbers £1-35 

□ Number 8 £1.85 
Number 9 £1.35 

□ Number 10 £1.35 
D Number 11 £1.35 

□ Number 12 £1.35 

(Those at£1 .85 incije'e a cover 
mounted cassette cor la rung superb 
gama software) 

Yes - 1 would tike Issue 
Fou r for only 75p 

(only with other orders from 
these pages) 



PLEASE NOTE 

Those offers ate separate from tba 
tact or ww mail-order -scheme. Yau 
crawl use sfce voue'fiers on ike mail- 
order page 10 obtain further dis- 
count* and free gifts - we've aJreedy 
knocked oft the mo«! vre cari! Ka» 
ever. iT yo/s preSet. you may ordw 
any of ihfl item* on tfcij page si fl*stt 
KOEfcUU. FULL F8JCE ilnoush Ae 
eT&rurr rtiaii-ordei scheme on th* 
pi*tnous page. Yon. can then WW %ha 
*atav«nl vosuciier and. il the prSSBt It 
.e*oi £13, ciaim a fie* gift, fTte* Mrflkl 
.mai& sense if yew. are eftterffiq | 
Other tfoodf »t the aair.e iiaia. 



I enclose a cheque or postal order for this amoul. plus the total payabls for mail order on the reverse of this 

form. The payment is made out to FUTURE PUBLISHING LTD. 



These binders look every bit as good 
as the magazine, and include the name 
'Amstrad Action' embossed In blocked 
Newvap Gold 011 the spine. Individual 
magazines are held in place by being 
slotted behind one of 12 wires 

Loyal readers, don't delay. Request 
your binder right away! 



Save £3! 

POWERPLAY 

Tours On cassette for just £6.95 

AA-Raved in this issue with a rating of 88% , 
Powexplay is a game with a difference. And 
if you've ever played Trivial Pursuit - this 
is Trivial Pursuit with a difference tool 

Like the board game, Powsiplay re- 
quires you to answer awkward questions in 
order to progress. The game comes with 
over 2,000 questions built in, and new 
questions can be added with its question 
compiler. However, unlike the board 
game, there is a whole new level oi 
strategy involved. 

Play is set on Mount Olympus, and each 
of the four players plays a Greek deity. 
Each player has four warriors moving 
around a grid ot colour squares; the colour 
of the square determines the category of 
the question. Players can challenge other 
players in their bid to destroy the other 
teams. 

It is a great game al £3.95- At £6.95 it 
should be in your collection! 



NEXUS 1 28 

EXPANDED VERSION FOR YOUR CPC61 28 

Only £12.95 on disk! 



We are offering you the chance to buy this 
September AA Rave, especially expanded 
for the S128 machine, at a special low price. 
You won't find this version in the shops, or 
in any other magazine - it is available only 
through Amstr&d Action. 

Nexus, from a new software company 
of thfi same name, is set in the headquarters 
of a powerful drugs baron based in' 
Colombia. He has captured a friend of 
yours, and your mission is to rescue him 
and break the drugs ring. You are helped 
by members of N.E.X.US-. an undercover 
operation working to bust it from inside. To 
break the ring you have to find the answer 
to a number of questions posed at the start 
of the game. 

The Ordinary version Of the game, as 



EXCLUSIVE! 

Available only 
through AM 



available in the shops, has eight levels - 
this version has a full ten. The original 
version poses you 3S questions - this ver- 
sion asks you to solve 421 It is bigger, better 
a:id cheaper from us! 



Half Price! 

Special offer for readers faking advantage of these pages: 

ISSUE 4 - with OCEAN 
cassette 

Only 75p If you order any other item from these two pages! 



The 1 16-page Christmas issue of 
Amstmd Action, with Kung Fu and 
Number One from Ocean on a cover 
cassette, retailed for £1 .50 and as 
a back issue normally costs £1 .85. 
You can have a copy and halve the 
original price if you take up any of 
this month's Special Offers. 

The cassette is arguabfy the 
best gift ever stuck to a magazine 
cover and up to the standard you 



would pay pounds for over Ihe 
counter. Kung Fu has superb 
animation and a two- pi ay or option; 
/VumberOrteis an addictive rollerball 
game with super-fast 3D graphics. 

And the issue itself isn't bad 
either, with our usual reviews and 
news, a look inside fine doors of 
Ocean, and plenty of maps and 
game-pokes. Superb value at £1 .50, 
and it could be yours for 75pM 



SUBSCRIBE! 

Ensure that you get the nexl 12 
copies of Amsirad Action with 
the minimum of fuss. £16-30 will 
make sure that every issue 
materialises on your doormat 
without you having 10 bl\ a fin- 
ger. 



Save E2! 

TRIO: 

Sam Goes Shopping 
Table Test 
Computer Snap! 

Yours for fust £7.95 on cassette, or E12.95 on disk 



If youVe been looking for software 
to get Arnold educating your tots, 
try Trio, three programs aimed at 
making learning fun for kids. When 
we first saw this software we were 
so impressed that we helped the 
authors find a suitable publisher, 
and now we can bring it to you at 
this special price. 

Trio is the first foray No 
educational seas by Piranha, a 



'small but lethal' software team 
wilhin Macmillan, which is one of 
Britain's most respected names in 
the world of books. 

The three programs in the set 
are Sam Goes Shopping (a challenge 
1o even adult memories). Tables 
Tesfand Computer Snap! (with no 
cards for parents to have to clear 
up afterwards). It is great fun for 
kids of ail ages! 



THE ALL-IN-ONE ACTION FORM 

This form has been created by the Save-Your-AA-From-Being-Overhacked-Department 
You can use it to register your votes for Games and Serious Software, or to send in your 

Type-ins, without losing any news or reviews. 



i 



GAME CHART VOTING FORM 

I would like to vote for the following games: 



PLEASE NOTE 

¥ou have a TOTAL o( tO votes tor each chart to attecale 

b»tw«n u p lo five prog rams - *g ( yau can give all 1 1 

one program or spl It them say 4*2+2+1 +1. 



GAME 



1. 



SOFTWARE HOUSE 



VOTE ALLOCATION 



3. 

4. 



5. 



SERIOUS SOFTWARE V 

/ would like to vote for the following pat 
PROGRAM 

1. 


OTING FORM 

:kages: 

SOFTWARE HOUSE 


VOTE ALLOCATION 


2. 






3. 






4. 






5. 









wp&m 




You can help us cut at AA, and give your type-ins a far better chance of being published, by filling 
out this form and wrapping it around your cassette with a rubber band. It would also be an idea if 
you send it in a jiffy bag as an awful lot of cassettes arrive here damaged. 

Name .„„,.....,.„,.....,„.., „„,... ,.„„„.... 

Address 



Postcode. 



TITLE. 

DESCRIPTION: 



! hereby declare that the program on the attached tape i$ ail my own work, and that it has not been 
sent to any other publication, nor been published in any form, or submitted to a software house 
for consideration as part of a commercial package. 

Signed - Date, 




# 



TM 




* (*.) 



Manhattan: I986>.fn a vast underground garzgeb&rit? 
Th& huge cavern echoes with th&sound of t i.-m-hinn steel. 



en, two tn^n are looted In mortal combat. 
Thehuge cavern echoes wfth the sound nf i Lushing steel, for although tAt^'ls^W &Oth centurv t one 6omt>atant wi^Ms an ancient 
murai sword, the others i>rciad^woni/j'hQ duet r& deadly tamest, ending anly when the foseris dmcapit&UHt. For the victor, howfiwr. 

.4ti»(?"lyortfl rnoneeortquest/n J dram** heihss been Mi/frpg for 4£Qyc?&*5. 
A unique brt>t*</ofnwn fated to duet down t/ic <7£6s to a distant time called the Gathering willhutttt* For tne Prizo— 
powar Jjpyrtrtd ivno^inbtjon. The distant timci :im *. ThcpJaee, r5tew Vbrk. ^^ 



HlghSaridiSf Productions Limited MCflfli.KXXVI. All Rights Reserved. TM -Trademark uwnwi by THORN EMI Screen Entertainment Ltd. 
.mil usi'ii by Oman Software Ltd,, und^r authorisation. Movi^ and Media Marketing Ltd.. U censing Agents. 




COMMODORE 

£a95 

AMSTRAD 



OCEAN SOFTWARE 6 CENTRAL STREET MANCHESTER MZ5NSTEL;06l 332 6633 TELEX 669977 OCEA 



USG 














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PRINTERS 

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JUifACH incknlrVB.T, Cjrr EJrtr* 
Scrhtaie orders idd E I 90 Pi P 
HanJuiutiMBrnddEJ.OOpffitw*** 



EXPRESS REPAJRS! 



Fairir> Atmttad? .. , . Sendpst the keyboard. DO NOT send The monitor, uniess 
trie monitor js a!so DEAD' (To make &ure monitor i's ££4D, smrcri on monitor in 
darkened room, fwn up twjfflineM to mArimum and attar 5 mw?u?*5 siwfcrt off. 
ttyan get a: bight spot refxeding, then monitor is O.K. (not D€AQ)}. Pteasesend 
a* items, \*eli packed by 'Compensation Fee Paid' - Post, delate from your P.O. 



AMSrRMDftlP.tiRS 
BETWEEN £14 Mtd £55 



BBC REPAIRS 
BETWEEN £14arri£45 



SPECTRUM REPAIRS 

BETWEEh£!it<S£2J 



ESTIMATES &VEN OH 

WINffflSftW DRIVES 

FTC. 



CQUMOOO#£ 
REPAIRS BETWEEN 

£l4*t*t£34 



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«PMAIMC01VI} 



OtWT AMI PRINTWORKS LANE, LEVENSHULME, MANCHESTER WiBZJP 
Tel 06 1 -224 1888 or 061 -224 3888 



Supa Soft Discount Software 



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AMSTRAD PACK 
# A View to a ki I 



• Friday the 13lh 

• Coda Name Matt 

• Handicap Golf 

• QntheOthe 

• Test M atch Cri cKcf 



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ADVERTISERS' INDEX 


A.G.F „ 93 


Ocean „ „ _.„..12,81,97,OBC 


Arnbyte__._. 88 


Piranha. . ... . JS5 


Arcana mTTT1 ^ M , L M 


Pride UtiJilies .40 


Ariola*of1 — AfiT 


RflitvbW „,.„ ...-.-..10-11 




School Softwartx- „,^8 


Otjmaik.^ ,.„„„ J3 


Screens Micro.- JO 




ShekhansL..,...-^.ii..<«<t30 


Evesham Mk:ros,„ „A4 


Sirwi Softwar»...-..-„^8 


Firebird ,„ ..,«.«„.... JBC 


SottinsiqhL J8 


Gargoyle. ... ...„._.._ ._ ....23 


Superior Software...... ,S6 


Goldmark SyaLema 40 






US Gold ...»JFC t 30, E2 


Martech „„-... ....^0,78 


TlrQI FTibi-iii riiriikliliilMtlHIItlrVV 


M jmorsoft 17 





98 AMSTRAD ACTION NOVEMBER 1986 



HEARTLAND 




1£S 01-379 6755 
01 -240 9134 

NATIONAL 44-1-379 6755 
T^L W4HK COMjMODORE64/12&^AMSTRAD/SCHNriDrK 



© 



COMPUTER GRAPHICS LTD. 




/&• 



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' 




23 

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£7.9 


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fc 


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5 


,-■ "^ j>* " '*¥ 







. you haven't all 
jn you're in for a rea/ surprise S 
g Mag Max to load it into your micro. 
Max could be a mean machine if you've < 
htm together. Build hirp up and r 
you'll need it! -■ believe it! 



>t what it takes to put 

-power increases - 



Irruuin 



MLancheste